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Need to Know: Ranking the Redskins' draft picks

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Need to Know: Ranking the Redskins' draft picks

Here is what you need to know on this Tuesday, May 5, 42 days before the Washington Redskins hold their mandatory minicamp.

Ranking the Redskins’ draft picks

Here is my ranking of the Redskins’ 10 draft picks as determined by factors such as needs, value, opportunity cost, how much the player will help the team in 2015 and beyond, and other such criteria. It is highly non-scientific, just my gut feeling before any of them puts on a Redskins helmet.

Also I like the group in general so a low ranking does not make me a hater; it’s all in relation to the rest of the players picked.

10. C Austin Reiter—Perhaps a better designation would have been N/A because I really know so little about him. I’m just not sure what a team that’s looking for big, power blockers and players from big-time conferences like the SEC is doing drafting a 296-lb. center from a non-power conference college.

9. G Arie Kouandjio—The knees, both of which have had surgery, are a concern. Perhaps they should have taken TE Blake Bell out of Oklahoma, who was still on the board. With Jordan Reed’s injury issues some insurance at the position is needed.

8. CB Tevin Mitchell—A few weeks into the 2014 season the Razorbacks were considering redshirting him because he had some troublesome hamstrings. And that was after he was benched in 2013. Had his best season as a sophomore and his career went downhill from there. Mitchel will need to reverse his career track if he is going to make it.

7. WR Evan Spencer—There’s a lot about Spencer to like but it might be hard to squeeze him on the 53-man roster. The four holdover wide receivers don’t appear to be going anywhere and fourth-round pick Jamison Crowder is sure to make it.

6. RB Matt Jones—I get the whole reach thing with him but that’s not a big deal. McCloughan said he was the best player on their board and I’m in no position to argue. He just doesn’t seem to be a potential every down back who could replace Alfred Morris should he get injured or leave as a free agent.

5. OL Brandon Scherff—I like the player a lot. But if you keep on taking low value positions with high draft picks you will continually have high draft picks. Perhaps on a side-by-side comparison edge rusher Vic Beasley doesn’t grade as high as Scherff but the value of a player who can get to the quarterback is much higher. Bottom line, Scherff had better be very, very good whether he plays tackle or guard, especially if Beasley and/or Leonard Williams become Pro Bowl regulars. We will see how it turns out.

4. ILB Martrell Spaight—He could be strong on special teams and he’s a sure tackler. But the Redskins have plenty of inside backers who struggle in coverage and that is not a strength of Spaight’s.

3. SS Kyshoen Jarrett—Anyone who watches Virginia Tech football knows that Beamerball, the tradition of the Hokies having great special teams, has not existed for a while. But the emphasis is still there and the decline of the Tech special teams isn’t Jarrett’s fault. He spoke very enthusiastically about playing teams for Washington during his conference call after he was drafted.

2. OLB Preston Smith—There are plenty of questions about new defensive coordinator Joe Barry but Smith could make him look like a genius in a hurry. I really like his versatility; McCloughan even talked about the possibility of him lining up at nose tackle in nickel situations. It will take him a year or two to learn all of the roles but when he does he could become a great weapon on defense. He was an under-the-radar pick that makes a ton of sense in retrospect.

1. WR Jamison Crowder—If he can do nothing besides break an occasional punt return for a long gain he will be worth the fourth-round pick. But he could do much more as a legitimate deep threat out of the slot. It might take him some time to learn the passing game but he could have impact as a returner right off the bat.

Timeline

—It’s been 128 days since the Redskins played a game. It will be 131 days until they play another one.

Days until: Redskins minicamp starts 42; Redskins training camp starts 86; Redskins @ Giants 142

If you have any questions about what's going on at Redskins Park, hit me up in the comments. And I'm always on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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Who is Nick Rose? Three things you should know about the new Redskins kicker

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Who is Nick Rose? Three things you should know about the new Redskins kicker

Here are three things you need to know about Nick Rose, who was signed on Tuesday to replace Dustin Hopkins.

1) His next NFL kick will be his first one

Rose has spent offseason time with the Falcons and 49ers since entering the league in 2016 after his collegiate career at Texas. However, he has never attempted a regular season field goal or PAT, so the first time he does so with the Redskins will be the first time ever for him as a pro.

The 23-year-old certainly has potential: He was one of the nation's top touchback producers in 2014 and 2015 for the Longhorns, so distance on kickoffs and field goals shouldn't be an issue (this video of him nailing one from 80, yes, 80, backs that up). What remains to be seen is whether he can split the uprights for Washington.

For what it's worth, Hopkins was totally inexperienced in the NFL when he first signed with the Burgundy and Gold, too.

MORE: UPDATED NFL POWER RANKINGS - 'SKINS IN TOP 10

2) He can make kicks in unconventional ways

While this doesn't come across as something Jay Gruden would ever want Rose to try in, say, this Monday's game in Philly, Rose can sink chip shots while simultaneously completing a backflip.

Ever seen Adam Vinatieri do that? Nope, didn't think so.

3) He beat out at least three other candidates for the job

With Hopkins likely done for the year with a hip issue, the Redskins worked out a handful of replacement options on Tuesday.

It was Rose, though, who emerged with a contract. He earned it over at least three other guys, including veterans Mike Nugent and Andrew Franks. Now he must bring that strong leg, as well as some accuracy, when called upon to ensure the 'Skins don't miss out on any points on a weekly basis.

Making kicks in the middle of backflips is fun, sure. But making them in front of national TV audiences instead of a YouTube audience is probably more fun. Let's see if Rose has what it takes to stick around.

RELATED: IN CROWDED NFC, WHY NOT THE REDSKINS?

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Redskins kicker Dustin Hopkins headed to injured reserve, per sources

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Redskins kicker Dustin Hopkins headed to injured reserve, per sources

Redskins kicker Dustin Hopkins will likely not play again this year, a source with knowledge of the situation tells our JP Finlay.

The team placed Hopkins on the injured reserve list, which means he's out at least eight weeks. To replace him, the Redskins signed Nick Rose, per NFL Network.

In his third season with Washington, Hopkins had made nearly 82 percent of his field goals this year. He made 12 of 13 extra points, but missed a very important extra point in Sunday's win over the 49ers.

Hopkins had a very strong leg, capable of touchbacks on kickoffs nearly every time the situation called for it. 

Rose is yet to play in the NFL but spent time with the 49ers. He kicked collegiately at the University of Texas.

As a senior in Austin last year, Rose made 13 of 17 field goals and 38 of 39 extra points.