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Rookie running back Jones is making some noise in Redskins camp


Rookie running back Jones is making some noise in Redskins camp

RICHMOND—Coaches don’t expect rookies to be perfect. But they do expect them to listen to what they say. It looks like Matt Jones is listening to his coaches.

During OTAs, when the players were not wearing any pads, Jones was being too physical, lowering his shoulder to finish off runs. Gruden said that they asked him to ease off, concerned that the 6-2, 231-lb. back would injure some defenders. Jones eased off and there were no injury issues during the offseason program.

When they arrived in Richmond for practice in pads, Gruden became concerned that Jones was maintaining his habits and being soft at the end of his runs.

“Randy [Jordan] and Scot [McCloughan] and myself, he's been challenged a little bit to finish some runs,” Gruden said on Friday. “A lot of the times in these practices you're not sure how to finish runs, but we want him to finish violently. That's what type of guy he is and he did that today, so I was excited to see Matt.”

What did Jones do that was so exciting on Friday? During the joint practice against the Texans, he rolled around the left end and headed up the sideline. Cornerback Kevin Johnson, Houston’s first-round draft pick, tried to stop him. Jones is three inches taller and about 45 pounds. The result was predictable and it was captured here:

Jones’ run drew hoots and hollers from the Redskins along the sideline, from both offensive and defensive players.

Mowing over Johnson wasn’t the only good play Jones made on Friday.

“He had a couple of really good cuts in the hole, unblocked,” said Gruden. “We had a poor assignment on a defensive end. We didn't block him and he made him miss in the hole. He made a great positive run in one of the run periods. He had a much better day today than he did yesterday.”

Jones’ style hasn’t drawn universal acclaim. Early in camp it seemed like the defenders were delivering some extra licks on Jones, perhaps in part to welcome the rookie to the NFL and in part to deliver some payback for the no-pads blows that Jones delivered in the spring. They run that de-cleated Johnson may have precipitated the brawl that took place at yesterday’s practice with the Texans.

If Jones keeps up the physical style during preseason games and when Week 1 comes around it will be difficult to keep him off of the field.

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Looking at the details of Zach Brown's contract with the Redskins

Looking at the details of Zach Brown's contract with the Redskins

The Redskins and linebacker Zach Brown agreed to a three-year contract that will require Brown to continue to play at a high level if he is going to collect all of the $21 million the deal contains.

Brown’s camp reportedly was shopping for a contract that had some $20 million in guaranteed money. The actual deal fell well short of that.

Brown, who was leading the league in tackles before an assortment of injuries forced him to sit out the last three games, got a total of $5.5 million in fully guaranteed money. He got a $4.5 million signing bonus and his $1 million salary for 2018 is fully guaranteed.


After that, the remaining two seasons essentially are team options. In 2019 he has a $6.75 million salary and $4.5 million of that is guaranteed for injury. His 2020 salary is $7.5 million with no guarantees of any kind.

The contract also has per-game roster bonuses available at a rate of $15,625 for each game he is on the 46-man game day roster in 2018 (total of $250,000 for the year) and $31,250 per game in 2019 and 2020 ($500,000 total).

The salary cap hits per year are as follows:

2018: $2.75 million
2019: $8.75 million
2020: $9.5 million

The average annual value of $7 million ranks ninth among inside linebackers.

Brown will need to continue to play well to collect on the contract. The team will be able to save $5.75 million on the 2019 cap if they terminate the deal after one season and $8 million if they do it in 2020.


Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.


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Need to Know: Redskins player quick hitters—Defensive starters

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Need to Know: Redskins player quick hitters—Defensive starters

Here is what you need to know on this Thursday, March 22, 35 days before the NFL draft.  

Redskins starters quick hitters—defense

The last couple of days here I looked at how the depth charts are shaping up with a little bit of commentary (offense, defense). Today and tomorrow I’ll take a closer look at the starters with some quick hitters about each one. Yesterday it was the offense, now the defense is up.  

DE Jonathan Allen—He was close to being ready to practice during the last couple of weeks of the season so his Lisfranc rehab is going well. Anticipation will be high when he takes the field in Week 1.

DE Stacy McGee—From looking at my social media timelines I can conclude that many Redskins fans hear “free agent D-lineman” and automatically say “bust”. That’s not the case with McGee. Last year he was the Redskins’ most consistent defensive lineman.

NT Ziggy Hood—I’ve said this before and it still holds true—Hood should not be a starting nose tackle. He would be very good as a rotational defensive lineman.

OLB Preston Smith—Sure, he’s inconsistent. But he’s on often enough to be a very valuable player. He lacks eye-popping sack totals but since he came into the league in 2015, only Smith has at least 20 sacks, 3 interceptions, and four forced fumbles.

OLB Ryan Kerrigan—He will turn 30 during training camp but he shows no signs of slowing down.

ILB Zach Brown—The Redskins needed to bring him back and they got it done. He does struggle in coverage at times, but the defense is much better with him than without him.

ILB Mason Foster—He and Allen saw their seasons end due to injuries at about the same time and the defense wasn’t the same after that. Foster brings experience and toughness to the defense that is hard to replace.

CB Quinton Dunbar—It’s possible that Fabian Moreau will beat him out for the starting job before the season starts. But Dunbar has come a long way since the former wide receiver volunteered to help out at cornerback when a rash of injuries hit during his rookie season. I wouldn’t bet against him.

CB Josh Norman—He certainly didn’t play poorly last year but the goose egg in the interceptions column is a black mark. The thing is, with quarterbacks like to test Dunbar and Moreau playing on the other side, he might not get many opportunities to pick off passes this year, either.

S D.J. Swearinger—After signing as a free agent, he put himself on the line, saying he was the leader of a defense before he had even played a snap with the group he wanted to lead. He walked the walk, filling both the leadership vacuum and the lack of quality safety play.

S Montae Nicholson—Jay Gruden said that Nicholson was the defensive version of Jordan Reed, a player who changes what the unit can do when he is on the field. High praise, but also a lot of pressure to stay on the field.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.

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Days until:

—Offseason workouts begin (4/16) 26
—Training camp starts (approx. 7/26) 128
—2018 NFL season starts (9/9) 172

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