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Should the Redskins draft a receiver?

Should the Redskins draft a receiver?

As we noted yesterday, the Redskins have eight wide receivers on the roster. NFL teams generally carry a dozen receivers during minicamps and training camp so they will almost certainly add some wide receivers to the roster.

The question is, will they add camp fodder, bodies who will catch passes in practice, try go get a few good plays on film during preseason games, and then get cut when the games start to count? Might they add some marginal talent that might compete for a spot at the lower end of the depth chart? Or will the aim to bring in a player who will seriously compete for playing time?

The latter option likely means spending a high or mid-round draft pick at the position. In a draft that is deep in wide receivers it is very easy to envision scenario where the Redskins’ turn comes up in, say, round 3 and the best player on the board is a wide receiver. In fact, if teams wait on drafting receivers because there are so many the two or three best players on the board could be wide receivers.

What should the Redskins do? Your third-rounder isn’t expected to start right away but he should at some point in the next year or so. But on the Redskins the top three wide receivers, DeSean Jackson, Pierre Garçon, and Andre Roberts, are all still in their primes and under contract for three more years. Since rookies get four-year contracts a 2014 draft pick would be entering the final year of his deal before getting a shot at a starting job.

Still, despite needs in other areas, the Redskins should seriously consider taking the best player available even if that player happens to be a wide receiver.

For one thing, the receivers in line behind the three top are nothing to write home about. Santana Moss will be 35 soon, Leonard Hankerson is coming off of his second major injury in three years in the league and Aldrick Robinson has yet to show that he’s anything more than a fast guy. Should Jackson, Roberts, or Garçon miss any significant time there would be a considerable drop off in ability.

And, as we know, contracts in the NFL are far from ironclad. The Redskins could release Garçon and Roberts next year with minimal cap pain and Jackson could go in 2016. Although right now it’s difficult to imagine circumstances under which the Redskins would want to make any of those moves things can change in a hurry. And they can change very fast if there is a younger and cheaper backup pushing hard for some playing time.

Certainly if the Redskins end up getting a wide receiver at any point during the draft the critics will be out screaming about other needs. They will have a case, especially if a player at a position of need goes shortly after the Redskins’ pick. But injuries happen. Jackson and Garçon missed five and six games with injuries in 2012, respectively. If November rolls around and one or two of the top receivers are sidelined they won’t worry about what was said in early May.

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Need to Know: If Kirk Cousins leaves, with the Redskins rebuild or retool?

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Need to Know: If Kirk Cousins leaves, with the Redskins rebuild or retool?

Here is what you need to know on this Tuesday, January 16, 57 days before NFL free agency starts.

Timeline  

Days until:

—NFL franchise tag deadline (3/6) 49
—NFL Draft (4/26) 100
—2018 NFL season starts (9/9) 236

Nickel coverage—Five Redskins questions

Taking a look at some of the key questions surrounding the Redskins, sometimes coming up with more questions in the process. Yes, it's going to be that kind of offseason. 

What will the Redskins do at left guard? It would be better for the Redskins to find their left guard in the draft, but assuming that the successor is picked after the second round, they will want someone to start until the rookie is ready. That could be Arie Kouandjio or maybe a veteran free agent.

Can the Redskins make do with what they have at running back? The short answer is no. The running back situation needs attention. It’s hard to picture Samaje Perine and Rob Kelley forming a formidable tandem, or even a very good one. I’m wary of spending a high draft pick on an RB, but the success of the likes of Todd Gurley and Leonard Fournette have to be factored into the thinking.

Are the Redskins OK with Zach Brown and Mason Foster at inside linebacker? For the time being they are, assuming that they are able to sign both of the unrestricted free agents, however the Redskins need to continue to build that position. That means continuing to develop Josh Harvey-Clemons to use in nickel situations and spending draft resources there. Even if Brown and Foster are back, the Redskins might be smart to grab Roquan Smith out of Georgia if he’s there in the first round.

If they are without Kirk Cousins, will the Redskins rebuild or retool? This is a key question for the organization. If Cousins leaves, do they just try to plug in the best available/affordable quarterback they can find and roll on with the same basic personnel with which they have hovered around .500 the last three years? Or will the make other changes, perhaps moving on from Josh Norman and Jordan Reed to save cap money for future seasons and give their younger players a chance to establish themselves? The latter might be the better way to go but this organization rarely considers short-term pain for long-term gain.

If Junior Galette leaves, who replaces him? While Galette did not light it up in the sack department, he put plenty of pressure on opposing quarterbacks. He is likely to leave since he would remain behind Preston Smith and Ryan Kerrigan on the depth chart if he re-signed in Washington. Can they rely on 2017 second-round pick Ryan Anderson to take a giant leap in his sophomore season? Will they try to lock up free agent Trent Murphy and hope that he can bounce back from an ACL injury he suffered last August and regain his nine-sack form of 2016? I don’t see how they can rely on Anderson to suddenly provide pressure after recording zero sacks this past year. Whether it’s Murphy or another free agent, someone with a better track record has to be in the picture. If Anderson improves enough to move ahead of that player on the depth chart, so much the better.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerNBCS and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.

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Where does Stefon Diggs' remarkable catch rank among some of the best NFL playoff walk-offs?

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Where does Stefon Diggs' remarkable catch rank among some of the best NFL playoff walk-offs?

There is nothing quite like January playoff football and Sunday night's Vikings vs. Saints game further proved this point.

In case you have been off the grid the past 12 hours, the Minnesota Vikings literally got a last second win against the New Orleans Saints.

With 10 seconds left in the fourth and facing a 3rd and 10, quarterback Case Keenum heaved the football near the sideline to wide receiver Stefon Diggs, who dodged two defenders while managing to stay inbounds for a 61-yard touchdown as the clock expired. 

It was one of the most remarkable playoff walk-off wins, if not the most remarkable one, in football.

So, where does it stand among the others?

RELATED: FORMER TERP PLAYS HERO IN VIKINGS' MIRACLE PLAYOFF WIN

Broncos vs. Steelers 2011 AFC Wild Card game: Remember Tim Tebow's 80-yard overtime touchdown to Demaryius Thomas during the 2011 Broncos vs. Steelers AFC Wild Card game? It was the first and last snap of overtime and it was wild.

Mile High Miracle: On third and three with 43 seconds left in the game, Ravens' Joe Flacco launched one towards wide receiver Jacoby Jones, who got in front of the Broncos receiver and ran the ball in for a 70-yard game-tying touchdown. The Ravens would eventually go on to win the game in double overtime. Some could argue it was the defining moment in the Ravens' Super Bowl run. 

Cardinals vs. Steelers Super Bowl XLIII: Under the brightest lights of all, Ben Roethlisberger found Santonio Holmes with 43 seconds in the fourth in the back of the end zone for a toe-dragging, Super Bowl-winning catch. 

RELATED: WHAT REDSKINS CAN LEARN FROM THIS WEEKEND'S PLAYOFF GAMES

Saints vs. 49ers 2012 NFC Divisional game: Sunday's loss wasn't the first time the Saints have experienced a fourth quarter letdown. Back in 2012, Alex Smith threw one to the endzone on 3rd-and-three with 14 seconds left that sealed a win.

While these are only a few, we can't wait to add more to the list in years to come.