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Tier-ing up over RG3's slot among fantasy QBs

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Tier-ing up over RG3's slot among fantasy QBs

With NFL training camps opening for business, it's certainly time to start gearing up for the allimportant business of fantasy football. Or, to phrase it another way for all those in Redskins nation,determining where RG3 goes in fantasy drafts.I suspect in these parts Robert Griffin III's average draft position will be higher than the national average seeing as many locally have come down with a severe case of RGIII-itis (After a season dealing with Rex-Beck syndrome, it's a welcome problem). My take, excerpted below from an article I posted on FFToolbox.com and discussed on this podcast, looks at Griffin and all the fantasy quarterbacks from a tier (and non-burgundy and gold colored glasses) perspective. Essentially after the top 12 options, there is a very shallow pool ofpassers fantasyowners should target as starters in deep leagues or high-end backups with potential for stardom. The Redskins passer is one of them.For a single game, I can imagine selecting the likes of Joe Flacco or Josh Freeman or Ryan Fitzpatrick depending on the matchup for all involved. However, when you consider the potential for greatness - at least on a fantasy level - in 2012, I'll side with RG3's upside over the ordinary upside offered by the suspect bottom half of quarterbacks.The "Tier-ing up over fantasy quarterbacks" intro is below along with the section involving RG3 (plus Jay Cutler and Matt Schaub). Click here to find out which tiers the other 29 starting passers and intriguing backupslanded in...--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Based on the fantasy football calendar, it is now time to get in touch with my feelings, those that involve drafting one player over another, that is. Actually, I'm not much for rankings. As the title of this piece indicates, I'm more of a tier guy.

We can quibble about Tom Brady v. Drew Brees (Brady), Tony Romo v. Matt Ryan (Ryan), Griffin III v. Luck (RGIII) and so on, but in some of those cases we're talking eye of the beholder type differences. As Kramer once noted on Seinfeld, it's all about levels.

Just because, as the FFToolbox rankings currently indicate, Jay Cutler is one spot ahead of Andy Dalton does not mean the two are of comparable value. Brady vs. Brees, yes. An aggressive Cutler vs. a play it closer to the vest Dalton, no. Simply taking the next name on a list, especially when viewing the entire draft board, is not always smart business.

As Mike Tyson once famously said upon hearing before a fight that his opponent had a plan to beat him, Tyson brashly countered that, "everyone has a plan, until they get hit in the mouth." The fantasy football equivalent is stating, as many do, bumper sticker claims of "waiting on QB" or "drafting best available" yet not realizing when adaptability is called for. The best way to put all your strategic components together is tiers.

Unlike Kramer, I actually completed my quarterback levels, err, tiers with all six plus a bonus rainy day grouping listed below. The specific order of each player within said tier is indeed my personal and current preference, but that's certainly not the point of this exercise. Understanding when you can bob and weave and when you have to jab, jab, jab with a needed selection is
Tier 4 Jay Cutler, Robert Griffin III, Matt SchaubThe low-end QB1QB2 market dries up dramatically after these three. Cutler's jerky vibe can be tough to root for, but he played rather well last season and finally, finally has a legitimate WR in his former Broncos' buddy Brandon Marshall. Not ready to declare RGIII another Newton, but his legs make his fantasy floor higher than most and the Redskins receivers are better than projected. His presence speaks more to his dynamic potential than purely 2012 production. Schaub's proven, but is another Andre Johnson injury away from sliding.

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Need to Know: The Redskins week that was—All-Redskins mock, fast-fading interest in Dez

Need to Know: The Redskins week that was—All-Redskins mock, fast-fading interest in Dez

Here is what you need to know on this Saturday, April 21, five days before the 2018 NFL draft.  

The Redskins week that was

A look at some of the most popular posts and hottest topics of the week on Real Redskins and NBC Sports Washington

Should the Redskins pursue Dez Bryant? This topic was one like a meteor, very hot for a short period of time before it quickly faded out. It started to heat up as soon as the Cowboys cut Dez (about a month too late) and when it was reported that he wanted to play against Dallas twice a year it really picked up steam. But then people started to actually think and figured out that signing Bryant didn’t make much sense for the Redskins. Add to that the reports that the Redskins had no interest and would not look into signing Dez in the future and the Redskins fans quickly lost enthusiasm for the topic.

Seven-round Redskins mock draft—I think that most Redskins fans would be happy with this mock. Well, I’ll say some Redskins fans, most is a pretty strong word in this case. 

Is the draft pool deep enough for the Redskins to trade back? There is plenty of talk about the Redskins trading down in the first round to recoup the third-round pick they gave up in the Alex Smith trade. But they need to be careful. Many consider the draft to be top heavy and they may lose their chance to pick up an impact player if they trade back too far. The question then becomes one of quality vs. quantity. 

Three questions as offseason workouts get underway—There will be plenty more questions that we can ask about this team. But we don’t really know what to ask before the draft, particularly when it comes to the defensive line and running back. One the personnel settle into place we will know what we don’t know. 

Tweet of the week

On Chris Cooley’s thought that the Redskins might try to trade back and get Da’Ron Payne in the draft and the use the assets obtained to move up to get Derrius Guice. 

This is related to the questions about trading back. On paper it looks like a good idea, assuming the Redskins want Payne. We’re pretty sure they would like to have Guice but we haven’t heard as much about the Alabama defensive lineman. 

I had many reply that Guice won’t be there in the second round. It’s possible, perhaps even likely, but you just don’t know. There was zero chance that Jonathan Allen would be there at No. 17 last year, right? 

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCS and follow him on Twitter  @TandlerNBCS.

Timeline  

Days until:

—OTAs start (5/22) 31
—Training camp starts (7/26) 96
—2018 NFL season starts (9/9) 141

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Redskins' schedule "rest disparity" is very fair in 2018

Redskins' schedule "rest disparity" is very fair in 2018

The NFL started taking into account a new factor when putting together its schedule this year. The concept is called rest disparity. It stems from a complaint made by the Giants last year. And, of course, when the Giants have a cold, the NFL sneezes and immediately does whatever it takes to cure the cold. 

Here is how Peter King laid it out this morning on the MMQB:

Last year, I heard the Giants were not pleased with their schedule because they felt they were too often playing teams more rested than they were. In consecutive October weeks, they played teams coming off byes, for instance. The NFL calculated a figure for every team based on the number of combined days of rest for their foes or for the team, calculating, for instance, in those two weeks, the Giants were a minus-14 (minus-seven for each of the foes, Seattle and Denver, coming off byes). In all, by my math, the Giants were a league-worst minus-22 in “rest disparity.”

So the schedule makers worked to minimize the rest disparity this year. According to King, the worst rest disparity in the league this year is minus-11. The Giants are minus-eight. 

The question that Redskins fans will have immediately here is if the Giants’ rest disparity was reduced at the expense of the team in burgundy and gold. The answer that will surprise many is no. 

The Redskins rest disparity in 2018 will be either minus-one or zero. The variance is due to the possibility that their Week 16 game in Tennessee will be flexed to a Saturday game (see details here). If the game stays on Sunday, they will be at minus-one in rest disparity. If it gets moved, they will have had exactly as much rest over the course of the season as did their opponents, in aggregate. 

If you're interested in the nitty-gritty, here is how it breaks down. In eight or nine of their games, they will have had the same amount of rest as their opponents. They play one game coming off of their bye, a Monday night game in New Orleans. The Saints play the previous Sunday, giving Washington a plus-seven in days of rest. That is canceled out when they play the Falcons in Week 9 after Atlanta’s bye. 

Due to their Thanksgiving game, they get three extra days off going into their Week 13 Monday night game in Philadelphia. Two weeks later the Jaguars will have those three extra days of rest when they host the Redskins, having played on Thursday in Week 14.

They lose a day relative to their opponents coming off of those Monday night games against the Saints and Eagles. The Redskins get an extra day prior to visiting the Giants in Week 8 as New York has a Monday night game in Week 7. 

So far, that comes to minus-one in rest disparity. That will remain in place if they play the Titans on Sunday, December 23. If the game is flexed to Saturday, they will gain a day of rest on the Eagles in Week 17, zeroing out the rest disparity for the season. 

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Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page, Facebook.com/TandlerNBCS and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.