Georgetown Hoyas

Why was a ref pulled from the Saints game?

837563.jpg

Why was a ref pulled from the Saints game?

From Comcast SportsNetCHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -- The NFL has removed a replacement official from the New Orleans-Carolina game because it discovered he's a Saints fan.Side judge Brian Stropolo has been replaced by an alternate, Tim Keese. The NFL made the decision Sunday morning just hours before kickoff."He was replaced because of the information that surfaced disclosing that he is a Saints fan," league spokesman Michael Signora said.The league will look further into the matter. It received several phone calls and emails about Stropolo, who is from New Orleans and posted several photos of himself in Saints gear tailgating at a preseason game on his Facebook page.Stropolo's Facebook page has since been taken down.Stropolo worked the Week 1 NFL opener, a nationally televised game between the Cowboys and the defending Super Bowl champion Giants.ESPN was first to report the news.Panthers general manager Marty Hurney declined comment on the situation, calling it "a league matter."The NFL locked out the regular officials in June after their contract expired. Negotiations with the NFL Referees Association broke down several times during the summer, including just before the season, and the league is using replacements for the first time since 2001.Back then, the lockout lasted for one week of the regular season before a settlement was reached. This is the second weekend the replacements are being used, and the NFL has drawn up a five-week schedule for using them if the labor dispute is not resolved.Last week, there was one major error by the replacement officials, when they awarded Seattle an extra timeout in the final minutes of a game at Arizona. The Cardinals held on to win and the crew's referee admitted the mistake after the game.

Hoyas, Patrick Ewing remain undefeated, beat Maryland-Eastern Shore

ewing_walker_usat.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

Hoyas, Patrick Ewing remain undefeated, beat Maryland-Eastern Shore

WASHINGTON -- Jessie Govan had his third straight double-double, Marcus Derrickson had the third of his career and Georgetown remained unbeaten under former star Patrick Ewing with an 83-57 win over Maryland-Eastern Shore on Saturday.

Kaleb Johnson scored a career-high 24 points for the Hoyas (3-0) on 9-of-13 shooting, including four 3-pointers. Govan had 23 points, making 10 of 15 shots, and grabbed 14 rebounds, and Derrickson had 14 points and 10 boards.

DMV POWER RANKINGS: SPIDERS FALL, MONARCHS RISE AFTER OPENING WEEKEND

With Johnson making his first three treys and going 7 of 9 from the field for 14 points, Georgetown raced to a 40-19 lead at the half. Derrickson and Govan had 3-point plays to help Georgetown open a 10-0 lead and the Hoyas had runs of nine and eight to lead 35-8 before the Hawks, who were 6 of 23 at that point, closed the half with an 11-5 run.

Miryne Thomas led the Hawks (1-2) with 16 points and Ahmad Frost had 14.

READ MORE: GOVAN IS ONE DMV STAR TO WATCH THIS SEASON

Quick Links

The NBA wants to end the one-and-done rule and the timing is right

adamsilver.png
USA Today Sports Images

The NBA wants to end the one-and-done rule and the timing is right

The NBA is building momentum towards a significant change in their draft entry rules. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has been outspoken about his preference to change the so-called one-and-done rule and on Thursday he met with the newly created Commission on College Basketball in Washington, D.C. to discuss the subject.

The meeting was first reported by ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski, who says the league could once again let high school players be drafted. The compromise could be a rule requiring those who go to college to stay for at least two years. That would be similar to Major League Baseball, which stipulates three years of college.

Would a similar rule be a good idea for the NBA? While the players' union would like the option to go straight from high school, there was a reason the one-and-done rule was implemented in the 2006 collective bargaining agreement. The perception back then was that players left for the NBA too early and many flamed out because of it. The thought was that some players would have had better careers if they were older and more experienced when they became professionals.

[RELATED: WILL JOHN WALL MISS GAMES WITH HIS KNEE INJURY?]

Darius Miles, Kwame Brown, Eddy Curry and Sebastian Telfair are notorious cases of draft busts who came out of high school. Many wondered if those guys would have been better off with a year in college to adjust to life on their own and with an intermediary step up in competition.

But there are important differences in the NBA's structure nowadays. Now there is a robust minor league system with G-League affiliates all over the country. There are also two-way contracts, allowing teams to pay more money to a prospect and have more flexibility in bringing them up to the NBA. Players don't have to adjust as quickly as they used to.

The G-League is going to continue to expand and the perception keeps changing. Now, it is more common to see players have a stint in the G-League either for development purposes or injury rehabilitation. Player development of baseball players is different, but the MLB's well-established minor league system is the reason why their rule allowing high school players to go pro really works.

The one year in college under the one-and-done rule, however, does have some positives. Most notably, it allows NBA teams to get a better read on draft prospects. Instead of evaluating guys exclusively in high school and AAU, they get to see them play in the ACC, SEC and other big college conferences.

NBA front offices may be hurt by it, but the time is right to go back to high school players entering the pros. Things are much different than they were in 2006 and the league can handle it. Ending the one-and-done rule would be better for the players and it should also make a lot of college basketball fans happy.

That is the good of what the NBA is considering, however, the rule requiring two years of college should not be part of the equation. If the NBA wants to grant some freedom, then actually do it. Some players may need just one year of college and nothing more. Don't punish them for it.

The two-year requirement seems like a very bad idea, but it could be part of the deal. Either way, it seems like the one-and-done rule could come to an end sooner than later and it's for the best.

[PODCAST: BRADLEY BEAL GOES 1-ON-1]