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Kelly Oubre, Jr. channels rapper Travis Scott in his style and performance on the court

Kelly Oubre, Jr. channels rapper Travis Scott in his style and performance on the court

Wizards forward Kelly Oubre, Jr. considers Houston his home, having lived there from 2005 when his family was displaced from New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina all the way until 2013 when he left for prep school in Nevada. For Oubre, the Houston connection runs deep.

It's a big reason why he admires rapper Travis Scott, a chart-topping artist who hails from Missouri City, Texas where Oubre once lived. They went to nearby schools in Ft. Bend; Oubre to George Bush High School and Scott to Elkins High School. Scott was known as Jacques Webster, Jr. at the time.

Oubre, who considers 'Butterfly Effect,' 'Uptown' and 'Yeah, Yeah' among his favorite songs, can name all the deep cuts from Scott's discography. 

"I go back all the way down to his first albums," Oubre said.

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But it's about more than the music for Oubre. He sees Scott as a style icon of sorts and someone he even emulates on the basketball court.

Just let him explain. Oubre listens to Scott's music before games including his new album with Quavo of Migos called 'Huncho Jack, Jack Huncho.'

Oubre has watched concerts of Scott on Instagram and YouTube. He loves the energy he brings to the stage.

"Go watch his performance online. He gets the crowd into it. He's screaming at the crowd. He's a real rock star with it. He's got a flavor, too," Oubre said.

Oubre has been known to scream to the crowd after a big dunk or after drawing an offensive foul. That, you could say, comes from Scott.

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Scott puts more emphasis on his live performances than most rappers. Many of his concerts feature mosh pits, which are unusal for the genre.

Scott described his concert style to MTV back in 2015. What he said was pretty out there, but very much a connection to Houston.

"It all extends from the rodeo based out of Houston. I kind of wanted make something similar to that in a way as far as the animals," he said. "I just kind of wanted to bring a lot of the kids and turn [them] into animals. Create the real-life circus for like the kids, a playground."

Okay, perhaps he lost you there. But Oubre feels he can channel that energy. As he told Chris Miller of NBC Sports Washington over the summer, Scott has influence on his fashion which also ties into his play on the court.

"I think I'm a rock star. That's how I kind of go about it," he said. "My game kind of represents my fashion, just going hard, raging and screaming to the crowd and all that stuff. I was a rapper, I would be Travis Scott. Just know that."

Yeah, man.

To hear more from Oubre on Travis Scott and other subjects like his dogs, burner Twitter accounts and taunts from fans, check out our interview with him on the Wizards Tipoff podcast:

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Bradley Beal on his struggles, getting an apology from Scott Brooks

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USA Today Sports Images

Bradley Beal on his struggles, getting an apology from Scott Brooks

Wizards head coach Scott Brooks remarked after Game 2 and following practice on Thursday that he was partly to blame for Bradley Beal's modest scoring output through two games in the team's playoff series against the Raptors. They weren't just throwaway lines, a coach trying to make his star player feel better for struggling in the playoffs.

No, Brooks truly meant what he said and followed up those comments with an apology face-to-face. Brooks met with Beal and John Wall in between Games 2 and 3 to see how they can get Beal going and reiterated that some of it all was on the coach.

"He apologized to me, which was weird because he's somebody who always holds me accountable for stuff," Beal said after Friday's shootaround. "I guess he figured I wasn't shooting the ball enough and he thought it was his fault. I don't know."

Beal, who is averaging 14.0 points in two games and scored only nine in Game 2, came away from the meeting with a good understanding of what he needs to do to get back on track. After apologizing, Brooks laid out a strategy in hopes that he, Wall and Beal can all be on the same page moving forward.

They need to get their All-Star shooting guard back to form on the offensive end.

"He just basically challenged me. He challenged me to be more aggressive on the offensive and defensive end," Beal said.

What has made Beal's scoring troubles through two games particularly surprising is how well he played against the Raptors during the regular season. He averaged 28.8 points in four games against Toronto and all were without Wall.

Beal shot 50 percent against the Raptors both from the field and from three. So far this series he's shooting just 39.3 percent from the field and 27.3 percent from long range.

Asked whether there is anything he can draw from the regular season to apply to the playoffs, Beal said it's not as easy as it may seem.

"Those games are different. The matchups are different to an extent. It's totally different in the playoffs because you have more time to prep and prepare and gameplan for us," he said. 

"I think the biggest thing is them being physical. They are real physical with me. Whenever I'm standing around on offense or moving around, they are grabbing me. I just need to be physical back with them. Keep moving off the ball and especially if Kyle [Lowry] is guarding me. Tire him out as much as possible. Continue to be aggressive."

Coaches use all sorts of leadership tactics to motivate players. Perhaps an apology will do the trick.

MORE ON THE WIZARDS-RAPTORS SERIES:

HISTORIC ODDS FOR TEAMS THAT GO DOWN 0-2

BROOKS MAY CHANGE STARTING LINEUP FOR GAME 3

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2018 NBA Playoffs Wizards-Raptors Game 3: TV, live stream and radio info, things to watch

2018 NBA Playoffs Wizards-Raptors Game 3: TV, live stream and radio info, things to watch

John Wall, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter and the Washington Wizards battle Kyle Lowry, DeMar DeRozan, Serge Ibaka and the Toronto Raptors on Friday night in Game 3 of the 2018 NBA Playoffs.

Here is all you need to know: TV, live stream and radio info, tip-off time, plus three things to watch:

GAME 3: TORONTO RAPTORS AT WASHINGTON WIZARDS

Series: Raptors lead 2-0
Where: Capital One Arena
Tip-off: 8 p.m.
TV: NBC Sports Washington (pregame coverage begins at 7 p.m.)
Live stream: NBCSportsWashington.com
Radio: 1500 AM

Do or die

If the Wizards lose on Friday night, the series will technically not be over. They will be down 0-3 with a home game up next and an opportunity to extend their season and send it all back to Toronto. That said, the odds would not be good. In fact, they would be pretty much as bad as they can be.

No team in NBA history has ever come back from down 0-3 in a series. So, unless the Wizards feel like they can make history, like UMBC over Virginia history, then they better win Game 3. 

Now, some teams have come close to making it happen. Three times before a team has gone down 0-3 and forced seven games. The last time was the 2003 Blazers, who fell in Game 7 to the Mavs. 

Recovering from an 0-3 deficit to win a seven-game series has happened in both baseball and hockey, most famously in 2004 when the Red Sox beat the Yankees to reach the World Series. At some point it will happen in basketball, but the chances are essentially next-to-none. The Wizards will be much better off by winning Game 3, just like they did last year when they went down 0-2 against the Celtics in the second round and forced a Game 7.

Beal and Otto

The Wizards are hoping to see more from both Bradley Beal and Otto Porter. It was a big topic of discussion at Thursday's practice how both guys need to be more aggressive in looking for their own shot. Beal was held to just nine points in Game 2 and Porter, the NBA's third-best three-point shooter, didn't even attempt one three.

Brooks held a meeting with Beal and John Wall to discuss how they can get Beal more opportunities, but ultimately it's up to him and Porter to force the issue for themselves. It would seem likely at least one of them breaks out in Game 3. They both were great against the Raptors during the regular season and both proved throughout the year that they can score against anybody.

Too many threes

The biggest reason the Wizards are down 0-2 in this series is the three-point shot. The Raptors have hit a ton of them and even though the Wizards have been intent on stopping them, they have had no such luck.

The Raptors hit 16 threes in the first game to set a playoff franchise record. They shot 51.7 percent from long range. In Game 2, they hit 13 and 11 were in the first half. They made seven of them in the first quarter alone to the tune of 44 points, the worst defensive quarter in the playoffs in Wizards franchise history since 1965.

This is how much the three-point shot matters: the Raptors' 11 first-half threes in Game 2 helped them outscore the Wizards by 18 points by halftime, but in the second half when they hit only two threes, the Wizards edged them by seven points. Washington has to stop the three-pointer, it's that simple.

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For more on the Wizards-Raptors series, check out or latest Wizards Tipoff podcast: