49ers

49ers CEO Jed York says he punched wall when Jimmy Garoppolo tore ACL

49ers CEO Jed York says he punched wall when Jimmy Garoppolo tore ACL

PHOENIX — The 49ers placed 24 players on injured reserve in 2017, and 17 members of the organization spent time on IR last season.

CEO Jed York said he was almost the 18th.

The past several seasons have been frustrating for both fans and York alike, especially when quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo tore his ACL against the Kansas City Chiefs in Week 3 last season.

“I’m glad I wasn’t on IR,” York said Sunday at the NFL owners meeting. “I was close in Kansas City. I thought I broke my wrist in Kansas City when I heard he tore his ACL.”

Now that some time has passed, York was able to explain the incident with a chuckle.

“It was a good punch,” York said. “Unfortunately, it was a stud. You’ve got to find the dry wall. That’s the key. It looks so much better to put a hole through the wall, as opposed to finding the stud.”

York said he has since moved past the frustration from that fateful day in Kansas City, which changed the trajectory of the 49ers' season. He put a positive spin on the injuries of Garoppolo and running back Jerick McKinnon, who tore his ACL a week before the start of the regular season. Garoppolo is ahead of schedule in his rehabilitation, York said, while McKinnon is right on pace. Both are expected to be cleared to participate fully in training camp.

“I think our guys have been very strong-willed and tough-minded,” York said. “They are able to fight through those things. It allows you to build character on your team, and I hope that will serve us well going forward.”

[RELATED: Jed York says 49ers 'were definitely in it' on Beckham trade]

York said he has been keeping an eye on his franchise quarterback, and is excited for the season to come. He's also been able to put the 49ers' spate of injuries, which prompted an overhaul of their training staff, in perspective. 

“It’s frustrating, but it’s football,” York said. 

Jimmie Ward has learned lessons, is showing why 49ers wanted him back

Jimmie Ward has learned lessons, is showing why 49ers wanted him back

SANTA CLARA – Jimmie Ward applied a lesson he learned from his second NFL game to help the 49ers preserve a 20-7 victory over the Los Angeles Rams on Sunday.

On the night Levi’s Stadium opened for its first regular-season game in 2014, Ward struggled as the 49ers’ nickel back against Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall in the 49ers’ 28-20 loss. Ward, the 49ers' first-round draft pick that year, yielded three touchdown passes to Marshall, who was six inches taller and 40 pounds heavier than Ward.

“He was a good wide receiver,” Ward recalled at his locker this week. “I didn’t know how to play a bigger wide receivers at the time. That was a good learning experience. I say that was a bad game, but when I watch film now, it was a learning game. I learned so much. Any time I get beat, I’m learning from it. Look at this year right now, getting beat in previous years in man coverage got me better for this opportunity this year.”

On Sunday, the 49ers’ offense left the door open for the Rams with a turnover in the fourth quarter. But Ward broke up back-to-back passes on third and fourth downs on short throws from Jared Goff intended for tight end Gerald Everett and wide receiver Cooper Kupp – two players significantly larger than Ward.

“The experiences of getting beat in years before, different body receivers compared to tight ends -- you got to play them guys different ways,” Ward said. “You got to know where your help’s at on the defense. What I struggled with over the years was just not using my help, too. I can’t play every guy the same. I can’t play a guy that’s twice my size aggressive. That’s suicide. He can out-body you, out-jump you. You got to play smart.”

Ward is back in the starting lineup at free safety after healing from a broken ring finger on his right hand, an injury he sustained before the season opener. Tarvarius Moore started the first three games.

In his two games back, Ward has shown exactly why the 49ers have continued to have a high opinion of his temperament, tenacity and skill despite his history of injuries.

Four of Ward’s five NFL seasons ended with him going to injured reserve with broken bones. Then after signing a one-year, prove-it contract to return to the 49ers, he fractured his collarbone, which kept him out of the first part of training camp. Then, the broken finger and subsequent surgery sidelined him at the start of the regular season.

Ward said he never took it for granted the 49ers would want to bring him back after the club won just 10 games combined over the past two seasons. But even after Ward sustained a second season-ending forearm fracture in two years, the club wanted him back. Coach Kyle Shanahan and the entire coaching staff did not want Ward to play anywhere else but with the 49ers.

“Especially during losing seasons, nobody’s safe,” Ward said. “Like, not even the people who are working around the building. They might replace them. I never thought I was safe. I always believed in working. So that’s what it is.

“That’s why I’m hurtin’ because I’m workin’. I wouldn’t get hurt if I wasn’t workin’. I wouldn’t get hurt if I wasn’t putting it all out there on the line. I’d be OK. I’d come out with no nicks and no bruises.”

[RELATED: Shanahan cracks jokes about Saleh, Washington]

While those who play with him, coach him and are around him every day universally have high opinions of Ward as an unselfish player and person, there is a segment of the fans who have taken to social media platforms to show a lack of empathy for all of his injuries.

Now, of course, Ward is receiving praise for the contributions he made in the victories over the Cleveland Browns and the Rams.

Ward has been through enough to know that things can change in a hurry.

“It’s cool, but it’s not going to get me a ring,” he said.

"Faithful, 49ers fans, I love them to death. Keep cheering. We need you at those games. Keep buying those tickets ... I’ve been playing hard, I’ve been breaking bones without people gassing me and when people tell me I’m a bust and I suck, so it’s cool. I appreciate it, but at the same time, it means nothing. It’s just like being 5-0 right now. We haven’t done anything, yet. We got to do something first.”

49ers players aren't surprised by Robert Saleh's wild sideline passion

49ers players aren't surprised by Robert Saleh's wild sideline passion

SANTA CLARA — It was impossible to turn on a sports television show or log onto social media without seeing defensive coordinator Robert Saleh fist pumping after the 49ers' 20-7 win Sunday over the Rams. 

It might be a new thing for fans to see, but players say he’s been this passionate as long as they’ve known him. 

“That’s probably the first time you guys have caught it, but he’s always losing his mind,” 49ers defensive back K’waun Williams told NBC Sports Bay Area. “It’s normal. We’re used to it by now. He’s always had that great energy.” 

After Sunday’s game in Los Angeles, Saleh admitted that he gets so excited during huge defensive plays that he momentarily loses all sense of time.  

“I’m not going to lie, I black out during those moments,” Saleh said. “I get excited for the guys and their success. When they make big plays, I feel like I’m right there with them. When we fail, I’m right there with them too. So, we’re always together.”

The 49ers defense has dominated through five games. Saleh is now being mentioned as a possible future head coach candidate, when just months ago, football pundits said his job could be in jeopardy.

Veteran cornerback Richard Sherman isn’t surprised in the quick change of public opinion, he’s seen it before. 

“It’s football,” Sherman said. “That’s how quickly things can change. He was a good coach before, even when they were scapegoating him. You can’t scheme for everything. You can’t scheme for injuries and mental mistakes and that’s what was happening out there.” 

In 2018, the 49ers defense had a record-low takeaway percentage and earned reputation of giving up huge chunk plays to opponents. Sherman said that wasn’t because of a change in Saleh, it was just mental mistakes by individuals trying to do too much, trying to save the day. 

“That’s what I appreciate about this year is that all we are doing is what he is telling us to do,”  Sherman said. “We’re just playing the scheme that he calls. If last year everyone would have just played the scheme that he called, we would have been a top-eight defense in terms of yardage gained, red zone percentage and third downs because it’s Saleh. 

“It’s a good scheme and he knows how to call a game." 

[RELATED: Shanahan busts out jokes leading into 49ers vs. Washington]

Maybe it’s a little more maturity from what was a young roster over the past two seasons. Maybe it’s trust that’s grown between the players knowing that everyone will simply take care of their responsibilities instead of trying to be a hero. 

Regardless of what has shifted to change the trajectory of the 49ers defense, the players expect to see that same enthusiastic Saleh losing his mind on the sidelines. 

“That just shows the passion and the love he has for our guys when we’re out there executing which is great," Williams said. “He’s been the same. The scheme is the same. It’s just that everybody is on their job and we’re just clicking on all cylinders. I guess we’re just seeing the dividends payoff now.”