49ers

Rookie LB Fred Warner is setting the tone for 49ers, but he might be a little too loud

fredwarner49erscampap.jpg
AP

Rookie LB Fred Warner is setting the tone for 49ers, but he might be a little too loud

When the 49ers selected inside linebacker Fred Warner of BYU in the third round of the draft, it was easy to see how he fit into the team's plan with the degree of uncertainty surrounding Reuben Foster.

While Foster remained away from the team’s offseason program for five weeks, Warner felt a need to get up to speed quickly if he was needed to be a starter for Week 1 of the regular season. Warner said he was determined to learn as quickly as possible at whatever position he lined up.

“They want consistency over a guy who can make a play here and there,” Warner said on The 49ers insider Podcast. “Because if you’re a liability and you’re out there missing assignments, stuff like that, that’s going to get you cut. You have to be able to retain this information very quickly and be able to produce on the field and put a good product out there. That’s the biggest thing.”

The 49ers consider the middle linebacker (mike) and weakside linebacker (will) positions as nearly interchangeable. The major difference is the mike position is the player who communicates in the huddle. Malcolm Smith is lining up with the first team at mike, while Foster is at will. Warner is leading the second team at mike.

Foster joined the 49ers’ offseason for the final four weeks after a judge dismissed two felony charges of domestic violence. Warner knew all about Foster, the player, before meeting him as a teammate.

“He’s a very physical player, and something I didn’t know about him that I know now, he’s probably the smartest guy in the room,” Warner said. “This dude has the memory of an elephant. He doesn’t have to write notes down. He just retains things very quickly. And I think that’s what allowed him to play at such a high level as a rookie last year, aside from his physical talent.”

Warner has also learned a lot from Smith, who played six NFL seasons before sitting out last year with a torn pectoral.

“We’ve worked after practice on man coverage on tight ends and running backs.,” Warner said. “Even though that might not be something we touch on in practice or a meeting, he just wants to touch on that with me because he said, ‘If you can do this, you can play on any team in the NFL.’ “

One of the few critiques of the rookie during the offseason program is that Warner, who said he was a quiet kid as a youngster, has been a little too loud.

“He’s very smart and he plays like it on the field,” 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan said during the first week of OTAs. “He doesn’t hesitate. He’s a rookie out there, but he’s calling the plays maybe even too loud because I can hear him from the offensive side. But, he doesn’t mind speaking up. He’s confident in what he’s doing.”

Warner said he wanted to win the confidence of his teammates, so that might have contributed to his increased decibel level.

“I want to make sure that when I get in that huddle and I’m talking to these guys, that they know that I know what I’m doing and I’m ready to go,” Warner said. “I’m the one who’s going to set the tone in the huddle before the play even happens.”

Marcus Allen calls T.O.'s decision to skip Hall of Fame ceremony 'mind-boggling'

Marcus Allen calls T.O.'s decision to skip Hall of Fame ceremony 'mind-boggling'

Former Raiders running back Marcus Allen knows a thing or two about the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

August marks 15 years since his induction, which came six years after his retirement from the NFL. He told NBC Sports Bay Area's Kelli Johnson and Monte Poole during The Happy Hour on Friday that the honor's meaning was "hard to put into words."

Consider Allen surprised, then, that soon-to-be-inducted Terrell Owens will skip the ceremony in Canton, OH on August 4. 

"It's mind-boggling to me because I think there is no greater platform in the football world than the Hall of Fame to really sort of say 'thank you' to all the people that have helped you get there," Allen said from the American Century Championship Celebrity Golf Tournament in Lake Tahoe. 

"No man's an island. We didn't get there by ourselves," Allen continued. "My father [introduced me] and I wanted the world to know who supported me [along the way]."

Allen added that he thinks Owens will regret the decision in the long run. 

The former 49ers wide receiver will commemorate his induction on August 4 with a speech at his alma mater, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga at 3:17 p.m. CT (1:17 p.m. PT), hours before the festivities in Canton. The Hall of Fame won't mention Owens at the ceremony, but will maill him his gold jacket that day.

Jerry Rice emphatically (and profanely) makes his case as the G.O.A.T

Jerry Rice emphatically (and profanely) makes his case as the G.O.A.T

Legendary wide receiver Jerry Rice has a case as good as anyone as the greatest football player of all time.

He is a three-time Super Bowl champion, a 13-time Pro Bowl pick and a 10-time first-team All-Pro. He's the NFL career leader in receptions (1,549), receiving yards (22,895), and total touchdowns (208). 

But you don't need us to tell you. The former 49ers and Raiders wideout made the case for himself with some colorful language to Charles Barkley at the American Century Celebrity Golf Championship in Lake Tahoe. 

We couldn't have put it better ourselves.