49ers

Why the 49ers should follow Rams' lead with uniform makeover

Why the 49ers should follow Rams' lead with uniform makeover

While the rest of FootballWorld is locked into the detritus of the NFL Combine (Leonard Fournette is fat until he goes to the bathroom! Christian McCaffrey a very fast runner and a bad furniture mover! The Philadelphia Eagles won a coin flip!), the real news from this week came from Los Angeles, where the Rams have decided to turn back the clock on their own heads.

Well, on their helmets, anyway.

They are abandoning the gold horns on the helmet for solely cosmetic reasons and replacing them white horns, as their forbears did in the 1960s and early ‘70s. They say it’s a throwback to the glory days, but (a) the glory days lasted eight years and the team lost their only two playoff games in that time, and (b) they didn’t change the jerseys, which still have that dismal gold.

So why should you care?

Well, if you’re a Raider fan, you shouldn’t care at all, since your own team hasn’t had a uniform makeover since 1964, save the one season they tried silver numerals on the road uniforms.

But then there are the 49ers, whose original colors weren’t red and gold but red and white, and whose original logo was the Dancing Gun-Totin’ Prospector. Given that uniform makeovers always go best after a dreadful year or years, it is hard to see how the 49ers couldn’t have considered a similarly retrograde look.

Oh, you devotedly faithful will tell us that the 49ers’ makeover was in the front office with John Lynch and Kyle Shanahan, but that only flies so far. The Rams fired longtime head coach Jeff Fisher and replaced him with Sean McVay, who is seven years younger than Jed York, and they still felt compelled to tidy up in search of new sales.

And yes, you can make the point that the Rams were playing before almost nobody last year in the first season in Los Angeles. But you have also seen the vast expanses of empty seats in Santa Clara, haven’t you? What makes that different?

This seems like a small matter compared to the fact that the 49ers met with North Carolina quarterback Mitch Trubisky today to get the cut of his jib, draftwise. But given that this is the season where everyone lies to everyone at every opportunity for every conceivable reason, anything you hear about him, them, or the meeting itself will be a festival of false.

So why not a hastily considered makeover just to move some product until Shanalynch fixes everything you really care about?

There is still the red, which is the principal color except when the 49ers decided to go all black in an attempt to cash in on the ninja craze. The gold looks nice enough, but it looked a lot better on Montana, Rice and Lott than it did Kaepernick, Smith and Reid.

And best of all, it brings back the prospector so that we can then agitate for the end of Sourdough Sam for reasons of redundancy.

We grant you here that the guns in the logo could be problematic for reasons of public relations, but remember that this is a league that still doesn’t mind Washington’s nickname. Or maybe you are troubled by the prospector’s angry face, ignoring that the last smiling mascot in NFL history was the 1969 Denver Broncos, and in that one the football player is standing on the horse’s back while wearing cleats, which is animal cruelty by any measure.

But the opportunity is probably lost, because a change now would make it look like York is reacting to Stan Kroenke, and reactionary behavior is what got the 49ers into the mess they’re in now.

And that’s too bad because as we hurtle back to the 1950s in so many different ways, the 49ers are missing a bet. Basic colors, a hearkening back to good old days that really weren’t, an angry prospector firing away at no discernible target below his feet . . . how does this not make perfect sense in these perilous times?

But if it helps, the Trubisky talks went well. Reportedly.

Source: 49ers, Nick Bosa scheduled to meet at Ohio State's Pro Day

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USATSI

Source: 49ers, Nick Bosa scheduled to meet at Ohio State's Pro Day

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The 49ers’ traveling party that includes general manager John Lynch and vice president of player personnel Adam Peters has moved on to Ohio State.

Lynch and Peters attended Alabama’s pro day on Tuesday and met with potential No. 2 overall pick Quinnen Williams, a defensive tackle.

On Wednesday, the 49ers are scheduled to meet with another possibility for the second overall selection, former Ohio State defensive end Nick Bosa, according to a source.

The 49ers and Bosa are scheduled to have dinner, reports Albert Breer of the MMQB. But a source has told NBC Sports Bay that the 49ers hope to move the date up to a late lunch.

Bosa is not scheduled to work out on Wednesday. The plan all along was to test well enough at the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis that any re-dos were not necessary. Bosa's marks ranked favorably against his brother Joey, the No. 3 overall pick in three years ago.

Nick Bosa is completely healthy after his final season at Ohio State was cut short due to a core muscle injury.

[RELATED: 49ers hire Dustin Little as head athletic trainer]

Among the other top draft prospects at Ohio State are quarterback Dwayne Haskins, defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones, wide receivers Parris Campbell and Terry McLaurin, and offensive linemen Michael Jordan and Isaiah Prince.

49ers hire Dustin Little as head athletic trainer, staff revamp continues

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AP

49ers hire Dustin Little as head athletic trainer, staff revamp continues

The 49ers named Dustin Little head athletic trainer Tuesday, locking in one of the final pieces of their new strength and conditioning and athletic training structure. 

After 17 players spent time on injured reserve during the 2018 season and 24 players the season prior, the 49ers sought change. The team fired longtime head athletic trainer Jeff Ferguson and head of strength and conditioning Ray Wright. 

General manager John Lynch and coach Kyle Shanahan both identified streamlining the two programs as an offseason priority. 

“It’s about where we want to go, how we can make the overall process of it better,” Shanahan said after the season ended. “Injuries happen, and we’ve looked into that, and we’re going to do everything we can to improve that. We have to, because that has hurt us a lot in the last two years.”

“We consulted with some other teams,” Lynch said a few months ago. “Organizations in some other sports, looking for the right answers, and trying to put our own stamp on it. We’re not trying to re-invent the wheel. We’re just trying to get that deal right."

Hiring Ben Peterson as the head of player health and performance several weeks ago was the first step of that process. Peterson and Little will work together closely, as the 49ers model their structure after the NHL and NBA. 

[RELATED: Football kept Kwon Alexander going after adversity]

“We are excited to add Dustin to our health and performance team and believe he is a tremendous fit for our group,” Lynch said in a statement Tuesday. “A wide net was cast for this search, and we simply kept coming back to him. 

“Our due diligence and a great recommendation from the Broncos organization, which is highly regarded for the care of its players, made us extremely confident in bringing Dustin aboard.”

Little comes to Santa Clara after spending more than five years in Denver in a variety of roles, including as an assistant athletic trainer and director of rehabilitation.