Athletics

Angels' Pujols joins 600-home run club in grand style

Angels' Pujols joins 600-home run club in grand style

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ANAHEIM — Albert Pujols hit his 600th career homer on Saturday night, delivering a grand slam to become the ninth player in major league history to reach the mark.

The Los Angeles Angels slugger connected in the fourth inning against Minnesota’s Ervin Santana, driving a high fly into the short left-field porch at Angel Stadium.

The milestone homer is the latest superlative in the 17-year career of Pujols, a 13th-round draft pick who became one of the greatest hitters of his generation.

The 37-year-old Dominican slugger is the fourth-youngest player to hit 600 homers behind Alex Rodriguez, Hank Aaron and Babe Ruth. Pujols joins home run kings Barry Bonds and Aaron as the only players to hit 600 homers and 600 doubles.

Pujols is the first player to hit his 600th homer since Jim Thome joined the club in August 2011. With his ninth homer this season, Pujols has joined the club with Bonds (762), Aaron (755), Ruth (714), Rodriguez (696), Willie Mays (660), Ken Griffey Jr. (630), Thome (612) and Sammy Sosa (609).

He also became the first to hit a grand slam for No. 600.

“I don’t play here for numbers,” Pujols said this week after hitting No. 599. “My goal since Day One when I got to the big leagues was to help the organization that I wear the uniform of. At the end of my career, numbers are numbers. I think I’m going to have plenty of time, but my main goal is to try to win a championship here.

“I’m aware of the history, don’t get me wrong. I respect it, but I think that’s kind of a distraction that I don’t want to bring into the game for me.”

Pujols hit his 599th homer on Tuesday and then went through three straight homerless games. The slugger rarely acknowledges the importance of individual accomplishments, but his fellow Angels thought he clearly wanted to reach the milestone at home before they hit the road Monday.

The Angels were excited, too: Mike Trout went to the ballpark right after having thumb surgery Wednesday because he wanted to see Pujols make history — and Trout has returned every night since.

“It’s pretty incredible,” Trout said. “Each night he gets a hit or gets an RBI, he’s passing somebody. (On Thursday) he passed Babe Ruth in hits. I think that’s pretty special. It’s remarkable, his career so far. He’s got a lot of baseball left, but I think the biggest thing is 600. That’s special.”

Pujols is in his sixth year with the Angels after beginning his career with 11 spectacular years in St. Louis. He became the youngest player to hit 250 homers and the first to hit 400 homers in his first 10 big-league seasons while with the Cardinals, and he is the only player ever to hit at least 30 homers in his first 12 big-league seasons.

The three-time NL MVP has slowed in numerous ways since joining the Angels, who haven’t won a playoff game since giving him a $240 million free-agent contract in December 2011. Pujols doesn’t round the bases or play the field with his youthful vigor, but he still delivers solid pop at the plate as one of the majors’ top RBI producers.

Pujols has homered in 37 different ballparks and against all 30 big-league teams, including the Cardinals. Santana is one of 386 pitchers to yield a homer to Pujols.

Pujols is the majors’ active leader in homers by a long shot, and the 600-homer club might not get its next member for several years. Detroit’s 34-year-old Miguel Cabrera has 451 career homers, and the next-closest player under 34 years old is Milwaukee’s 33-year-old Ryan Braun with 292.

“What Albert is about to do, it’s legendary,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said before Friday’s game. “To be able to witness it is something special. You look around baseball, and the guys that have reached that plateau are few and far between, to say the least. It’s such a special journey. It doesn’t happen very often.”

Pujols has hit 155 homers in nearly 5 1/2 seasons with the Angels, dropping well off the incredible pace established when he hit 445 homers in his 11 seasons with St. Louis. He hit at least 40 homers in six seasons with the Cardinals, but has done it only once for Los Angeles.

Although he has made just one All-Star team with the Angels, Pujols has been a consistent offensive threat in Orange County when healthy, racking up 119 RBIs last season and ranking third in the AL with 38 RBIs entering Friday’s games. Injuries and age have forced the Angels to use the formerly above-average fielder largely as a designated hitter: He played only 28 games at first base last season and just four this year.

“This guy is probably the toughest ballplayer I’ve ever seen,” Scioscia said. “To be able to go out there at maybe 50 percent and still be productive, what he means to the team in the dugout, in the clubhouse, you can see why he’s been a winner his whole career.”

A's award-winning run this offseason 'really special' to organization

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USATSI

A's award-winning run this offseason 'really special' to organization

The hardware just keeps rolling in for the Oakland A's.

Just look at the list of awards the A's have claimed over the past two weeks:
• AL Manager of the Year -- Bob Melvin
• Sporting News AL Manager of the Year -- Melvin
• MLB Executive of the Year -- Billy Beane
• Two Gold Gloves -- Matt Chapman and Matt Olson (plus two more finalists in Jed Lowrie and Marcus Semien)
• AL Platinum Glove -- Chapman
• Wilson Defensive Player of the Year -- Chapman

"It's really special," A's general manager David Forst said. "Seeing the individual awards has been great. It means a lot to everybody in the organization."

That list doesn't even include Edwin Jackson, who was named a finalist for the AL Comeback Player of the Year Award. The winner will be announced Monday.

The A's also were represented in the AL Cy Young Award and MVP voting -- Blake Treinen tied for sixth in the Cy Young race, and four A's finished in the top 20 of the MVP voting: Chapman (seventh), Khris Davis (eighth), Treinen (tied for 15th), and Jed Lowrie (tied for 20th).

"When it was announced on the network that Bob (Melvin) had won (AL Manager of the Year), you could hear the applause from all corners of our new office in Jack London Square," Forst said. "That was the case for both Gold Glove Awards, and really everything this offseason that has kind of energized the organization. It has been really special the last month."

Quite the momentum to take into an important offseason, as the A's search for starting pitching and other components that can help return them to the playoffs.

MLB rumors: A's, Yankees talked Sonny Gray deal, but no trade imminent

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AP

MLB rumors: A's, Yankees talked Sonny Gray deal, but no trade imminent

It could be Sonny again in Oakland, but there's reportedly still a long way to go. 

The A's reached out to the Yankees about acquiring right-handed pitcher Sonny Gray, "but there is no present momentum in talks," MLB Network's Jon Morosi reported Friday. 

Last week, Fancred's Jon Heyman reported the A's were interested in re-acquiring Gray, who pitched in Oakland from 2013 to 2017 before being traded to New York. As Morosi noted, they've had no problem bringing back former pitchers, and there's good reason that a return to Oakland could bring the best out of Gray.

For one thing, he was a much better pitcher away from Yankee Stadium since the Bronx Bombers acquired him at the trade deadline in 2017. Gray went 6-7 with a 6.55 ERA and 1.70 WHIP in 88.0 innings in the Bronx. By contrast, he was 9-9 with a 2.84 ERA and 1.18 WHIP on the road. In 386.0 innings at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum with the A's, Gray was 25-20 with a 3.50 ERA and 1.17 WHIP.

Injuries to promising young starters such as Sean Manaea and A.J. Puk forced the A's to use a patchwork starting rotation down the stretch last season, and the team relied on a bullpenning strategy en route to its first playoff appearance in four years. As a result, A's executive vice president of baseball operations Billy Beane identified starting pitching as the team's top priority this offseason.

[ROSS: How Patrick Corbin's contract could affect A's starting pitching market]

[MORE: Did Nathan Eovaldi's playoff heroics put him out of A's price range?]

Re-acquiring Gray would maintain the approach that kept the rotation afloat last season but offer the A's much more upside than bringing back Cahill and Anderson. With the Yankees actively looking to trade Gray, it makes a lot of sense for both teams.

Based on Morosi's report, it sounds like they'll have to start picking up the phone, though.