Athletics

Khris Davis to go on 10-day IL after leaving A's 5-3 win over Indians

Khris Davis to go on 10-day IL after leaving A's 5-3 win over Indians

A's manager Bob Melvin confirmed that designated hitter Khris Davis will go on the 10-day injured list as he continues to recover from a left hip contusion.

"He's even resigned himself that he probably needs to take the full 10 days off," Melvin told reporters after Tuesday's 5-3 win in Cleveland. "His swings today in batting practice felt a little better, but once he got into the game, it was no better."

Davis suffered the injury more than two weeks ago in Pittsburgh when he collided with the left field side wall making a catch.

The 31-year-old has been in and out of the A's lineup since then, but clearly has been bothered at the plate. Davis exited Tuesday's game after just one at-bat, following a couple of tentative swings and a weak grounder to shortstop.

"He was finding a way to get some hits, but today, it just got to the point where it's not getting any better at all," Melvin said. "So we have to give him a little bit of a rest and get him back when he's 100 percent. He's a power hitter. He needs his lower half. he creates a lot of torque. That's where his power comes from."

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Davis told reporters that he felt like it might be more of an oblique issue than his hip. He will get an MRI on Wednesday in Cleveland.

Mark Canha and Chad Pinder figure to get more playing time in Davis' absence. Canha pinch-hit for Davis in the third inning on Tuesday and blasted a two-run home run off Trevor Bauer, his sixth of the year.

Pinder has hit two home runs in his last three games and has five for the season, along with a .270/.311/.459 slash line.

The A's have not announced a corresponding move to replace Davis on the active roster, but they will likely either activate outfielder Nick Martini from the IL or call up Skye Bolt or Jorge Mateo from Triple-A Las Vegas. Martini has missed the first 49 games of the season with a sprained knee, but is currently in Las Vegas on a rehab assignment.

[RELATED: Profar finally finding his stroke]

Bolt made his big league debut earlier this season, going 1-for-4 with a double in three games with the A's. He is slashing .319/.388/.586 in Triple-A.

Mateo is off to a hot start in Triple-A as well, slashing .321/.362/.567. The 23-year-old has notched six home runs, 37 RBI, and 11 stolen bases.
 

Why A's should either trade or non-tender All-Star Blake Treinen

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Why A's should either trade or non-tender All-Star Blake Treinen

Editor's note: Over the next two weeks, we will examine 10 A's players who may or may not return to Oakland next season. For each player, we will provide reasons why the A's should bring him back and reasons why they should not, followed by a final determination.

Blake Treinen, RHP

Contract: Final year of arbitration (projected to get $7.8 million after earning $6.4 million this season)

Reasons to bring him back

In 2018, Blake Treinen enjoyed one of the greatest seasons in MLB history. The right-hander went 9-2 with 38 saves and a 0.78 ERA, notching 100 strikeouts in 80 1/3 innings.

Unfortunately, Treinen followed that up with the worst season of his career, going 6-5 with a 4.91 ERA in 2019, ultimately losing the closer job to Liam Hendriks. Still, Treinen's stuff looked dominant at times and he could certainly bounce back in 2020.

Treinen is still just 31 years old and should have some productive years ahead of him. His fastball averaged 97 mph this season with explosive movement. If he can improve his command, Treinen could still be a productive reliever moving forward.

Reasons to let him go

Treinen is coming off an incredibly disappointing season. He entered the year as one of the top closers in baseball, but quickly lost his closer job due to injury and poor performance.

Treinen's 4.91 ERA, 1.62 WHIP, and 5.14 FIP were all career worsts, as were his 37 walks in just 58 2/3 innings. He saw his season come to a premature end when an MRI revealed a stress reaction in his back. And pitchers and back injuries don't mix well (see: Marco Estrada). Tendering Treinen a contract would be a major risk.

Final verdict

Treinen could very well return to being an effective relief pitcher, but the A's can't afford to take that chance for nearly $8 million. That money would be better spent on multiple relievers to help shore up the team's shaky bullpen.

[RELATED: A's stay or go candidate for 2020 season: Jake Diekman]

Between Treinen's on-field struggles and the injury concerns, Oakland would be better off seeking an offseason trade of its former All-Star closer. If the A's can't get a deal done, look for a non-tender.

Why Jake Diekman's command issues could mean A's move on in offseason

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Why Jake Diekman's command issues could mean A's move on in offseason

Editor's note: Over the next two weeks, we will examine 10 A's players who might or might not return to Oakland next season. For each player, we will provide reasons why the A's should bring him back and reasons why they should not, followed by a final determination.

Jake Diekman, LHP

Contract: $5.75 million mutual option for 2020 ($500,000 buyout)

Reasons to bring him back

Diekman's stuff is undeniable. The 32-year-old left-hander boasts a 96-mph fastball along with a wicked slider, making him a tricky at-bat for right-handed and left-handed hitters alike.

Despite a 1-7 record and 4.65 ERA this season, Diekman notched 84 strikeouts in just 62 innings. For his career, he has averaged 11.2 punchouts per nine innings.

Another reason to keep Diekman is Oakland's lack of left-handed relievers. Jesús Luzardo and A.J. Puk both figure to move to the starting rotation next year and Ryan Buchter's return is far from certain. As a result, Diekman could be the only southpaw in the A's bullpen.

Reasons to let him go

While Diekman's strikeout numbers were highly impressive, his lack of command became a major issue down the stretch. He walked 39 batters this season, including 16 in 20 1/3 innings with the A's.

That contributed significantly to Diekman's disappointing 1.42 WHIP and 4.65 ERA. For $5.75 million, you'd have to think the A's would want someone more consistent and reliable in the late innings.

[RELATED: A's 3B coach Williams will manage in Korea next season]

Final verdict

Oakland is unlikely to bring Diekman back next season for a couple of reasons. Far too often, he just doesn't know where his pitches are going. Throughout his career, Diekman has averaged five walks per nine innings. That's a serious problem for a setup man.

The other factor is Diekman's $5.75 million price tag. That is a high figure for any non-closer, but particularly worrisome for a setup man who has proven to be inconsistent.

The A's would probably be wise to spend that money elsewhere.