Athletics

Trump supporter recognizes Maxwell, denies him service in hometown restaurant

maxwell-knee-restaurant.jpg
AP

Trump supporter recognizes Maxwell, denies him service in hometown restaurant

Update (10/25/17): The manager of Keegan's Restaurant has responded to Maxwell and denied all his reports

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Backlash from Bruce Maxwell's protest late in the Major League Baseball regular season has followed him to his hometown. 

In a recent interview with TMZ Sports, the Oakland A's catcher said he was recognized by a Huntsville, AL waiter while grabbing lunch and was denied service. 

"He was like, 'you're the guy who took the knee? I voted for Trump and I stand for everything he stands for.'"

Maxwell said he responded with surprise and that his friend, a local councilman, shared some words with the restaurant's manager who assigned them a different server. 

"Unless you're subject to it, you won't understand it. You won't feel it. It's crazy to talk about it, but it's real. It really is," Maxwell said. 

In the same interview, Maxwell said he and former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick -- the athlete credited with beginning the current protest against social injustice and police brutality -- have become good friends. 

Jeurys Familia joins the A's at perfect time and picks up win in debut

Jeurys Familia joins the A's at perfect time and picks up win in debut

Jeurys Familia didn't have a whole lot of time for introductions. The newest Oakland A's reliever arrived at the Coliseum just over an hour before first pitch Sunday, less than 24 hours after being acquired from the New York Mets.

A few hours later, the 28-year-old reliever made his A's debut, with the game on the line, no less. Familia entered a 5-5 tie in the ninth inning and proceeded to pitch two scoreless frames, earning the win when Matt Chapman singled home Marcus Semien in the bottom of the 10th, giving the A's a 6-5 victory over the Giants. 

"When you have that kind of a trade and you come to a new team, first impressions are important," A's manager Bob Melvin admitted in his postgame press conference. "When you pitch the way he did, it makes you feel like part of the team very quickly. He was terrific."

"Unbelievable," Sean Manaea marveled from the A's locker room. "I remember watching him in the World Series a couple years ago, and just watching him today, his stuff is nasty. I'm super excited to have him."

Familia joined the A's at the perfect time, as closer Blake Treinen was unavailable to pitch Sunday after throwing 41 pitches the night before. A former All-Star closer, Familia will primarily be used in a setup role moving forward, but he has no problem with that.

"I'm not really concerned with it," he told reporters after the win, through an interpreter. "Whether I pitch the seventh, eighth, or ninth inning, i just want to help the team win."

Added Melvin: "To come into a tie game, you have to be perfect. To do it two innings in a row, for the first time in front of the fan base and in front of your team, there were probably some nerves involved. It certainly didn't show. It was big."

Prior to this weekend, Familia had spent his entire career in the Mets organization. He was understandably emotional when he found out about the trade.

"It was really difficult," he said. "I spent 11 years there, six years in the big leagues. It was really tough to say goodbye to some of those guys."

But Familia is excited to be on a contender and help form one of the best bullpens in all of baseball. The A's are the only team in MLB without a loss when leading after seven innings (39-0), and now they've added another All-Star closer to the mix. Good luck coming back against that.

A's walk off Giants to clinch 'The Bridge' in trophy's first year

A's walk off Giants to clinch 'The Bridge' in trophy's first year

The Oakland A's won on a walk-off against the San Francisco Giants for the second straight game on Sunday, and picked up a trophy in the process. Sunday's win clinched the Bay Bridge Series, and thus "The Bridge," the trophy designed to commemorate the rivalry. 

"The Bridge" was on the line on Sunday. While the Giants couldn't have won the season series, they still could have won the trophy. Although the Bay Bridge Series would have been tied 3-3, San Francisco would have won "The Bridge" by virtue of winning the series' last game. 

Andrew McCutchen gave the Giants a one-run lead with a solo home run in the eighth inning, but A's slugger Khris Davis erased it with a solo shot of his own (and his second homer of the day) in the next half-inning. 

Oakland first baseman Matt Olson appeared to all but clinch "The Bridge" with a sixth-inning solo homer, his second on Sunday, to give the A's a 4-1 lead. But Pablo Sandoval cut the lead to one with a pinch-hit RBI double in the seventh inning, then Alen Hanson flared a pinch-hit single to run two at-bats later to tie the game 4-4.

"The Bridge," a trophy made from steel of the original San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, commemorates the interleague rivalrly between the Bay Area's big-league baseball teams. It is awarded to the winner of each year's regular-season series.