Giants

Barry Bonds' 762nd home run ball reportedly could fetch $750K in auction

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AP

Barry Bonds' 762nd home run ball reportedly could fetch $750K in auction

Barry Bonds holds baseball’s all-time home run record, with 762 of those bad boys being hit over the fence. So when he hit that 762nd homer, one could assume that ball would be worth a lot.

And it turns out, it just might be.

And, in this case, it's all about timing. 

When the historic ball first went up for auction in 2008, it sold for $376,612. Not bad. But now it's possibly worth about double. (!!!)

TMZ was told the ball could "fetch three-quarters of a million dollars by the time bidding ends."

Goldin Auctions is in charge of the ball, and their photos show it's still in pretty great shape, minus some rubbed dirt marks and an abrasion on the "stamped sweet spot." It's also complete with an affidavit of ownership from James Sutton, who gave the details of the September 2007 night he went to Coors Field to watch the Rockies host the Giants. 

"Although I initially bobbled my attempt to catch the Barry Bonds #762 HR Baseball, I was sole person that was immediately and ultimately able to grab onto, hold and possess the Barry Bonds #762 HR Baseball (hereinafter referred to as 'Catch' or 'Catching')," Sutton stated in the affidavit. "I was the first person to touch the Barry Bonds #762 HR Baseball after it left the bat of Barry Bonds."

[RELATED: Check out these Bonds stats some fans might not know]

Sutton also stated in the affidavit that nobody besides himself has had possession of the ball.

Feeling lucky? Or have a ton of money? You have about 26 days left from the time this was written to place a bid on this piece of MLB history. The current minimum bid is $150,000.

Joe Panik's walk-off aided by slow Giants alertly stealing two bases

Joe Panik's walk-off aided by slow Giants alertly stealing two bases

SAN FRANCISCO — The Giants have the slowest roster in the big leagues, but they won a game Tuesday night with some speed. Or rather, by mixing some smarts with some speed. 

Braves closer Luke Jackson showed zero interest in checking on runners in the ninth and Kevin Pillar and Mac Williamson took advantage, twice stealing second before Joe Panik’s single brought them both home in a 4-3 win. The late rally came in drips, but it led to a thrilling win on a night when the Giants were absolutely flat for eight innings. 

Jackson seemed to be having issues with the signs, repeatedly asking catcher Brian McCann to run through them again. He was deliberate, and Pillar took advantage first, a few moments after his RBI single with two outs brought Brandon Crawford screaming home and cut the deficit to one. Jackson never checked on Pillar with Pablo Sandoval at the plate and he took off, sliding in just ahead of McCann's throw. 

Sandoval ended up with his 10th pinch-hit of the year, but with Pillar at first, Josh Donaldson's diving stop at third would have led to a game-ending force. Instead, Pillar eased into third as Sandoval raced to first with no throw, reaching on an infield single. Sandoval was replaced by Williamson, who also received no interest from Jackson. On an 0-2 pitch to Panik, he stole second without a throw. 

"That was huge," manager Bruce Bochy said. "Kevin, he's a basestealer and that was a huge base. Once Mac got it, now you realize it just takes a hit to win the game. That's a big base."

Panik's eyes got wide once Williamson touched second. 

"I don't have to hit a double to win the game," Panik said. "I can stay within myself, stay in the middle of the field, and you can win the game with a single."

Panik did, ending a great at-bat by pulling a curveball into right, a few feet past a diving Ozzie Albies. The only speed Panik needed was to get away from a rush of teammates waiting with kidney punches and turkey taps. But before that, he took advantage of tendencies, too. 

Panik has been as locked-in as an Giants hitter the last three weeks, and he fouled off three pitches while getting to 2-2. When Jackson threw a fastball that never threatened the plate, Panik thought back to the scouting report. 

"I thought it was a setup pitch for his breaking ball," he said.

[RELATED: Anderson feels support from rivals]

It was. Jackson went to his curve on 3-2 and the game was over a few seconds later. 

"That's a great comeback," Bochy said. "We looked pretty flat. We just couldn't get going offensively. Their guy (starter Julio Teheran) did a great job on us. That's a huge win.

Joe Panik gives Giants 4-3 win with two-run walk-off single vs. Braves

Joe Panik gives Giants 4-3 win with two-run walk-off single vs. Braves

The San Francisco Giants were on the verge of their 27th loss of the season.

But second baseman Joe Panik had other ideas Tuesday night.

With runners on second and third base and two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning, Panik roped a single to right field. Kevin Pillar scored from third, and pinch-runner Mac Williamson beat the throw from Braves right fielder Nick Markakis, giving the Giants a dramatic 4-3 win.

What little crowd remained at Oracle Park on a damp evening went crazy.

It was Panik's third career walk-off hit.

The Giants now are 21-26 on the season.