Giants

Brandon Crawford, Buster Posey come up short in 2018 Gold Glove voting

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AP

Brandon Crawford, Buster Posey come up short in 2018 Gold Glove voting

SAN FRANCISCO -- For the first time since 2014, the Giants do not have a Gold Glove Award winner. 

Brandon Crawford's three-year run as the NL's Gold Glove shortstop was snapped, with the Diamondbacks' Nick Ahmed taking home his first award. This did not come as a surprise to the Giants, who knew Ahmed had a big lead in some defensive metrics. He led the NL with 21 defensive runs saved, finishing well ahead of Crawford (six) and Freddy Galvis (seven), the other finalist. Ahmed also had a clear lead in the SABR index, which makes up 25 percent of the vote. 

Buster Posey was also nominated for a Gold Glove, but Cardinals backstop Yadier Molina won at catcher. Posey, the 2016 winner, started just 85 games because of a hip injury that required surgery. 

The Giants had won five Gold Gloves in the previous three seasons. Prior to Crawford winning his first in 2015, the Giants had not won a Gold Glove Award since 2006.

Sonny Gray traded to Reds in three-team deal after A's, Giants interest

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USATSI

Sonny Gray traded to Reds in three-team deal after A's, Giants interest

Both the Giants and the A's reportedly had interest in acquiring Yankees starting pitcher Sonny Gray this offseason, but he won't return to the Bay Area. He will be heading to the Cincinnati Reds as part of a three-way trade.

Gray signed a three-year. $32-million extension as part of the deal, plus a club option . The Yankees originally received second baseman Shed Long and a 2019 competitive balance pick from the Reds for Gray and left-handed pitcher Reiver Sanmartin. 

But Jerry Dipoto wanted to be a part of it. The Mariners also traded Josh Stowers to the Yankees for Long.

Everyone caught up? 

Gray would have made sense for both Bay Area teams, as the Giants and the A's could use an influx of quality starting pitching. Gray went 11-9 with a 4.90 ERA and 123 strikeouts in 130.1 innings for New York last season, but he was far better on the road than he was at home. 

Considering Oakland Coliseum and Oracle Park are far more pitcher-friendly than Yankee Stadium, a bounceback season in the Bay Area certainly could have been possible. Alas, it appears Gray could be making his home starts at Great American Ball Park, which just might be the most hitter-friendly park in the entire league.

Why Josh Harrison would fit Giants but isn't perfect platoon partner

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USATSI

Why Josh Harrison would fit Giants but isn't perfect platoon partner

With Farhan Zaidi now at the head of decision-making, the Giants want a more versatile roster. One player who fits the mold and has been linked to the Giants in recent months is Josh Harrison.

FanCred's Jon Heyman resurfaced the report Sunday, listing the Giants, Dodgers, Angels, Phillies and Rays as teams interested in the former Pirates second baseman. 

Giants manager Bruce Bochy has said he will embrace platooning players, and second baseman Joe Panik consistently has been talked about as a player the front office will look at as a left-handed hitter in need of a right-handed partner. 

So, could Harrison be the answer? Yes and no. 

Harrison, 31, certainly is the kind of multi-positional player Zaidi covets. While he spent 87 of the 89 games he saw in the field at second base, compared to just two at third base in 2018, he has played five positions -- second, third, right field, left field and shortstop -- over his eight-year career. 

The Giants could use Harrison all over the field, but is he the right platoon partner at the plate with Panik? Not exactly. 

Panik hit just .191 against left-handed pitching last season, compared to .282 facing right-handers. But Harrison, a right-handed hitter, also struggled mightily against left-handed pitching. He had reverse splits, hitting .262 against right-handers and just .219 against left-handers in 2018. 

Harrison's splits very well could be an outlier, though, making him more intriguing to the Giants. He hit .286 against left-handers in 2017, and is a .279 career hitter against southpaws. 

They'll have to hope his 2018 season isn't a sign for things to come, but Harrison makes plenty of sense for the Giants to at least entertain adding the utility man.