Giants

D'backs acquire former All-Star shortstop from Brewers

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D'backs acquire former All-Star shortstop from Brewers

The Arizona Diamondbacks continued their roster overhaul Saturday by making a five-player trade with the Milwaukee Brewers. 

Arizona sent second baseman Aaron Hill, pitcher Chase Anderson and minor league infielder Isan Diaz to Milwaukee for 2013 All-Star shortstop Jean Segura and pitcher Tyler Wagner. 

Segura, 25, is seen as the biggest prize of this swap. In his first full season in the bigs, Segura was named an All-Star and finished the year hitting .294/.329/.423 with 12 home runs. 

But, Segura's production has declined the last two seasons. 

Last season he hit only .257/.281/.336 while only knocking six over the fence. Segura's speed continued to be a threat though, swiping 25 bases. 

In Arizona, Segura could take over as the team's new shortstop or replace Hill at second base.

Hill, an 11-year veteran, hit .230/.295/.345 with six home runs in 2015. For his career, the 2009 All-Star has hit .268/.323/.423 with 151 home runs.

Anderson should slot right into the Brewers' starting rotation. The 28-year-old went 6-6 with a 4.30 ERA last season and is 15-13 with a 4.18 ERA in his two-year MLB career. 

The final piece headed to Milwaukee is a highly-touted middle infield prospect in Diaz. 

Diaz, 19, was a second-round high school draft pick selected by the D'backs in 2014. The native of Puerto Rico had a huge 2015 season, hitting .360/.436/.640 with 13 home runs in 68 games played. 

Along with Segura, the Brewers also sent over starting pitcher Tyler Wagner. 

Wagner, 25, made his MLB debut last season. In three games, the righty went 0-2 with a 7.24 ERA. 

Giants' Evan Longoria expresses displeasure with slow MLB free agency

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USATSI

Giants' Evan Longoria expresses displeasure with slow MLB free agency

Despite playing 11 years of Major League Baseball, Giants third baseman Evan Longoria has never gone through free agency. He signed a six-year contract with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and then a 10-year extension with the club in 2012.

But with what he's witnessing this offseason, it's safe to say he isn't looking forward to the day he has to partake in the process.

Longoria took to Instagram to share his displeasure, writing the following: 

We are less then a month from the start of spring and once again some of our games biggest starts remain unsigned. Such a shame. It’s seems every day now someone is making up a new analytical tool to devalue players, especially free agents. As fans, why should “value” for your team even be a consideration? It’s not your money, it’s money that players have worked their whole lives to get to that level and be deserving of. Bottom line, fans should want the best players and product on the field for their team. And as players we need to stand strong for what we believe we are worth and continue to fight for the rights we have fought for time and time again.

What Longoria is arguing is a lot of common sense that baseball fans need to understand.

Let's look at the following point: "As fans, why should “value” for your team even be a consideration? It’s not your money, it’s money that players have worked their whole lives to get to that level and be deserving of. Bottom line, fans should want the best players and product on the field for their team." 

He's not wrong. 

The money either goes to players, making them millionaires, or owners, making them billionaires. Who are we watching on the field? It's quite simple. 

Sure, it might be fun to play armchair GM, but fans should want the best and most entertaining product on the field. We can understand why teams rebuild, but that doesn't mean we have to get to this point as fans. Every team can afford a Bryce Harper or a Manny Machado.

The best game is the most competitive game, and that's what players want. Fans should be nodding their head in agreement. 

What's most interesting from Longoria is the fact that he's calling out the system and calling for players to fight back. The MLB collective bargaining agreement ends at the end of the 2021 season. If anger increases from players, negotiations could get quite awkward. 

Joey Bart named Giants' best defensive prospect by MLB Pipeline

Joey Bart named Giants' best defensive prospect by MLB Pipeline

Giants top prospect Joey Bart is known for his bat. The No. 2 pick in the 2018 MLB Draft hit 13 home runs in his first 51 minor league games, which is just three behind Evan Longoria's team lead on the big-league club. 

Don't forget about his defense, though.

Bart, the top catching prospect in baseball, also has been named the Giants' top defensive prospect by MLB Pipeline of MLB.com. He has markedly improved since high school, when scouts wondered if he could stay at catcher, enhancing his agility and receiving and improving the accuracy of his strong arm.

The fact that scouts once questioned Bart's future at the position and now his defense is being praised, as it pertains to the Giants' farm system, says a lot. On the 20/80 scouting scale, MLB Pipeline rates Bart's defense as a 55 and his arm as a 60. 

At Georgia Tech, Bart was named the ACC Defensive Player of the Year in 2018. He also called pitches, a task that manager Danny Hall didn't even let two-time Gold Glove winner Matt Wieters do when he was a Yellow Jacket. 

In his final college season, Bart had a .992 fielding percentage and threw out 12 of 21 stolen base attempts. After joining the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes (Short-Season Class A), Bart's fielding percentage dropped to .983 after he allowed six passed balls and five errors. He did, however, gun down 15 of the 21 runners trying to swipe a bag on him.

Bart's bat most likely always will be ahead of his glove. The fact that he's seen as such a well-rounded prospect, though, is an added bonus to the player the Giants hope can lead them back to the top in the near future.