Giants

Giants acquire veteran catcher Erik Kratz in trade with Brewers

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Giants acquire veteran catcher Erik Kratz in trade with Brewers

SAN FRANCISCO -- A day after they made a seemingly endless series of transactions, the Giants got going with an early morning trade. 

Catcher Erik Kratz was acquired from the Milwaukee Brewers, with minor league infielder C.J. Hinojosa headed the other way. The deal was made a day after the Giants released Rene Rivera, a similar veteran who appeared in line for an Opening Day job. 

When Rivera was let go, Aramis Garcia looked to be in line for the backup job. But Kratz is a right-handed-hitting veteran who is out of options, so the Giants may keep him instead. Kratz, 38, will be playing for his eighth big league team. He hit .236 for the Brewers last year with six homers and six doubles in 203 at-bats. 

Kratz was a surprise contributor in the postseason, hitting .292 in 26 plate appearances. He is known for doing good work defensively and is a strong clubhouse presence. 

It's unclear why the Giants elected to go with Kratz over Rivera, who worked with their pitchers all camp. Or why they may be shying away from sticking with Garcia, who had a good spring and also knows the pitching staff well. Those questions will be answered in the next four days, and the Giants figure to make many more moves before the dust settles. 

[RELATED: Giants trade Matt Joyce after three days with team]

Hinojosa was once viewed as a future utility man at the big league level, but he was suspended 50 games last season for a positive test for a drug of abuse. When he returned, he posted a .689 OPS. 

To clear a 40-man spot for Kratz, the Giants DFA'd pitcher Jose Lopez, acquired at the start of the spring from the Reds. 

Rockies' Nolan Arenado continues to dominate Giants in odd MLB season

Rockies' Nolan Arenado continues to dominate Giants in odd MLB season

In a way, it's almost comforting. Not for Giants pitchers, but for the rest of us. 

In a year in which nearly everything about baseball and society has changed, one thing remains as normal as ever. When Nolan Arenado sees a Giants pitcher on the mound, he becomes a nightmare, no matter who that pitcher is or what his swing looked like before the series. 

Arenado came into Monday's game with a .226 average and no extra-base hits in his first eight games, but the Giants, as they always do, got him going. The third baseman hit a mammoth two-run shot off Johnny Cueto on Monday night and a low screamer that just cleared the fence off Kevin Gausman a day later.

"He hit it and I automatically thought it was a double," Gausman said. "It just kind of kept going and kept going and the next thing you know it went over the fence. Not the most fun thing. It was a bad pitch in a bad situation.

"Most guys would probably get out on it, the fact that it was so bad, but he does such a good job of keeping his barrel in the zone so long that he can hit those pitches that are out of the zone."

That homer was Arenado's 30th against the Giants, breaking Todd Helton's franchise record. It once again brought up a question we've been asking for eight years: What is it about Arenado and the Giants? 

"I don't know, I really don't know. I think whenever you face the Giants -- I've always said this -- coming up when I was a rookie it was the Giants who were the team. They would go to the World Series and win every other year it seemed like. They were just in a different category," Arenado told Rockies reporters Tuesday night. "They were so good, so elite, you knew that they were always going to be there. San Francisco, when I first came up, it was daunting going there. I don't know what it is. There's always motivation. It's like going to L.A. now. You always get excited because of the energy in San Fran, the energy in L.A. It's always super fun to play against them. 

"For some reason our games against the Giants here are always kind of crazy, but I really don't know. I really don't know. I'm just happy I'm doing it. Hopefully it continues but I really don't have the answers for that one."

[BALK TALK: Listen to the latest episode]

Arenado always has said he's not sure why the numbers are so skewed. If anything, he should like the Giants more than any other organization. They drafted his younger brother, Jonah, in 2013, and Nolan would light up over the years talking about following a career that ended in 2019 when Jonah was released from Double-A. 

But on the field, there's nothing, even a weird 60-game season, that can stop him from demolishing Giants pitching. Bruce Bochy is gone. Madison Bumgarner is gone. Buster Posey is sitting out. Same old, same old for Arenado. 

"Yeah, he's always going to be who he is," right fielder Alex Dickerson said. "By the end of the year he's going to be a fantastic hitter and sometimes you see a guy that good is that cold to start and you know something is going to happen."

Arenado said Monday that he hasn't "felt right at all this year." He spent time before the series opener working on hitting drills and testing new bats. But perhaps all he needed was to look into the opposing dugout. 

Arenado has played 128 games against the Giants and has a .296 average, .359 on-base percentage and .562 slugging percentage, with 103 RBI. Those 30 homers are his most against any opponent and came in 102 fewer games than Helton needed to get his 29. 

[RELATED: Kevin Gausman's homecoming doesn't go as planned]

This is nothing new to Giants fans, but it is to manager Gabe Kapler. Arenado was just 12-for-48 with no homers against the Philadelphia Phillies in Kapler's two years there, but Kapler said Arenado always was the guy he wanted to avoid when he would come into Denver.

"You don't want him up in a big spot," he said. "The tricky part is he's got some guys around him who you don't want up in a big spot, either. From Charlie Blackmon to (David) Dahl, to Trevor Story, who I think is one of the more dangerous right-handed hitters in baseball. It's not an easy middle of the lineup to get through, and this is something you'll hear me say about a lot of the lineups in baseball.

"They're just stacked in the middle, but in particular with Arenado, I know he's been a Giant-killer. We're always aware of his presence."

Duane Kuiper's hilarious home run call that was double in Giants' loss

Duane Kuiper's hilarious home run call that was double in Giants' loss

Giants broadcaster Duane Kuiper has one of the best home run calls in baseball. On Tuesday night, his famed call took a wild turn in San Francisco's 5-2 loss to the Colorado Rockies

With two runners on and one out in the top of the fifth inning, outfielder Steven Duggar stepped to the plate as the Giants trailed, 3-0. On a 3-1 count, Duggar hammered a fastball to left field. Kuiper started his home run call with his usual, "IT IS ..." This time, however, he couldn't finish it with "OUTTA HERE!" 

No, instead, Kuiper said to Giants fans, "IT IS ... we don't know." And truly, we didn't. 

The third-base umpire originally called it a home run, which tied the game. But upon further review, Duggar's blast hit the very top of the yellow line on the Coors Field wall. This made a big difference, too. 

While a three-run homer would have tied it up and given the Giants some big momentum on the road, a double just scored two, narrowing the Giants' deficit to one run. Mike Yastrzemski then struck out and Alex Dickerson flew out to end the inning. 

[RELATED: Gausman's long-awaited Coors Field homecoming was rocky]

The Giants didn't score again in the loss. 

Baseball truly is a game of inches ... and hilarious moments from Kruk and Kuip.

[BALK TALK: Listen to the latest episode]