Giants

Giants' Buster Posey gets it right again in toughest career decision

Giants' Buster Posey gets it right again in toughest career decision

Buster Posey's off days are rarely days off. Posey and his wife, Kristen, spend much of their time raising funds for and visiting with infants and children who have cancer. They go to hospitals, host a gala and generally give as much time and energy as possible to a cause that will be Posey's legacy long after he hangs up his catcher's mask for the final time. 

The Giants catcher is a three-time World Champion, an MVP and possibly a Hall of Famer. But the biggest impact he is making on society comes in those hospital rooms, and it is a passion that will guide the rest of his life. 

Posey revealed that there is another cause near and dear to his heart Friday morning. Buster and Kristen have spent years trying to adopt, hopeful that they could add to a family that already included two vibrant 8-year-old twins. They have had a couple of adoptions fall through, including one in which they had a baby for a few days before the birth family changed its mind. 

As MLB became embroiled in ugly negotiations and the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the United States, the Poseys kept trying. They matched with a set of twins a couple of months ago, and last Friday, Ada and Livvi, twin girls, were born. As his teammates reported to Oracle Park for the first time, Posey stayed home and continued wrestling with a decision that seemed tough, but ultimately was not. 

Posey opted out of the 2020 MLB season Friday. He will stay home with his wife and a family that now has swelled to six with the addition of two babies who were born prematurely at just 32 weeks. 

"This ultimately wasn't that difficult a decision for me," Posey said. "From a baseball standpoint, it was a tough decision. From a family standpoint and feeling like I'm making a decision to protect children, our children, I think it was relatively easy."

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Posey now is a father of four, and much of his summer will be spent in a neonatal intensive care unit, not at the ballpark. He has spent months talking to doctors and getting his hands on any available data, and ultimately there was very little that needed to be decided. The twin girls will be in a fragile state for four months minimum, he said, which covers the entire baseball season. 

Posey first talked of potentially opting out on a video call with reporters last Saturday. He had already addressed the issue with team executives, manager Gabe Kapler and teammates. Posey has said repeatedly that his biggest fear was the unknown.

"Talking to different doctors, there are no solid answers on what it'll mean if the babies contract the virus," he said. "Unfortunately, there's just not any data right now. This is so new that we just don't have those answers."

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The final answer, then, became an easy one. Posey is 33, and he is foregoing what looked to be a potential bounceback season. He also is giving up about $8 million. Posey said that if the twins had not been born last week and had not been so premature, he "probably would be playing" this season.

The timing did not line up, but that doesn't matter. The Poseys long ago committed to a goal that is far more important than anything Posey would have accomplished on the field this season. He said he has wrestled with this decision, but on Friday morning he looked at peace. If he had any lingering doubts, they likely floated away Thursday night when his eight-year-olds, Lee and Addison, celebrated their new siblings by cutting up confetti and throwing it over their heads.

"My wife, myself, and our older children are just overwhelmed with joy to welcome them into our family, to love them unconditionally, and just share life with them," Posey said. 

Giants vs. Rockies live stream: How to watch MLB games online, on TV

Giants vs. Rockies live stream: How to watch MLB games online, on TV

The Giants are set to begin a daunting 10-game road trip Monday that could dramatically alter their 2020 season, as they will square off against the Colorado Rockies, Los Angeles Dodgers and Houston Astros away from home over the next week and a half.

The Giants (5-5) start their trip at Coors Field against the surprising Rockies (6-2). The Giants are coming off a series win against the Texas Rangers, while the Rockies most recently took two out of three from the San Diego Padres.

Here's how you can watch the Giants play the Rockies online (download the MyTeams app here!) and on TV:

Monday, Aug. 3

When: Giants Pregame Live at 5 p.m. PT -- First pitch at 5:40 p.m. PT
TV: NBC Sports Bay Area
Stream: MyTeams app

Tuesday, Aug. 4

When: Giants Pregame Live at 5 p.m. PT -- First pitch at 5:40 p.m. PT
TV: NBC Sports Bay Area
Stream: MyTeams app

Wednesday, Aug. 5

When: Giants Pregame Live at 5 p.m. PT -- First pitch at 5:40 p.m. PT
TV: NBC Sports Bay Area
Stream: MyTeams app

Thursday, Aug. 6

When: Giants Pregame Live at 11:30 a.m. PT -- First pitch at 12:10 p.m. PT
TV: NBC Sports Bay Area
Stream: MyTeams app

Why Gabe Kapler sees signs of life with Pablo Sandoval's latest swings

Why Gabe Kapler sees signs of life with Pablo Sandoval's latest swings

It was just a single, and Pablo Sandoval ended up standing on first and watching three straight teammates strike out. But his hit in the second inning Tuesday might have been one of the more well-timed ones of his second stint with the Giants. 

All MLB teams have to cut from 30 to 28 players on Thursday morning, and with that deadline looming, it was not hard to look at Sandoval's stat line and see a potentially tough decision coming for the front office. Sandoval still has just three hits in 26 at-bats, and he's not being used in a versatile role. Regardless, manager Gabe Kapler stuck him right back in the lineup, noting that there were signs of life in Tuesday's loss. 

"Last night was a really good signal with respect to his swing," Kapler said on a Zoom call Wednesday morning. "He really crushed some balls, crushed them on the ground, and ultimately in a perfect world you're able to elevate the balls that you hit hardest, and when he's at his best that's exactly what he's doing. What we've seen with Pablo has been a slow progression towards his good swing."

Sandoval is working with the new staff to get his legs more involved, and on Tuesday he certainly looked more like his old self. In that first at-bat he pulled a 95 mph pitch from German Marquez into right field at 109 mph. He flied out to deep left in the fourth, and then grounded out twice, including a double play. But those two grounders left the bat at 104.7 mph and 108.7. 

[BALK TALK: Listen to the latest episode]

It's hard to tell what the Giants will do with Thursday's moves, especially since their need for 15 pitchers is still there, but it can't be a comfortable time for players who are slumping or pigeonholed, as Sandoval has been. He has not played third base yet, with Donovan Solano a preferred option as Evan Longoria's backup. He also has just five plate appearances against left-handed pitchers. 

"We have a lot of options to hit lefties, from Solano to (Wilmer) Flores to Darin Ruf to (Austin) Slater to (Mauricio) Dubon," Kapler said. "We've got a lot of guys who are really equipped to take down at-bats against lefties. It's a little bit thinner when we're facing a right-handed pitcher."

[RELATED: Nolan Arenado continues to crush Giants]

Kapler still believes Sandoval is one of his best late-game options against tough righties, and on Wednesday he should get three or four more at-bats to prove if his swing is coming back. He is the DH against hard-throwing righty Jon Gray, and Kapler sounded confident in the choice. 

"We kind of evaluate Pablo very similarly to the way we evaluated him when we came out of our secondary camp," Kapler said.