Giants

The Giants will retire Barry Bonds' number

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AP

The Giants will retire Barry Bonds' number

The San Francisco Giants announced that the team will retire uniform number 25 and celebrate the career of Giants great Barry Bonds on Saturday, August 11 when the club hosts the Pittsburgh Pirates at 6:05 p.m. at AT&T Park. In addition to a pre-game number retirement ceremony, the first 20,000 fans will receive a #25 cap.

Bonds will join an elite group of New York and San Francisco Giants players as the 12th player to receive this honor. Bonds wore number 25 in his 15 seasons with the Giants from 1993-2007. He will join Orlando Cepeda (30), Juan Marichal (27), Willie Mays (24), Willie McCovey (44) and Gaylord Perry (36) as the sixth member of the San Francisco Giants to have his uniform number retired.  New York Giants legends whose numbers have been retired include:  Bill Terry (3), Mell Ott (4), Carl Hubbell (11) and Monte Irvin (20).  Christy Mathewson and John McGraw – who both predated numbers on jerseys – have also received this honor. 

“No other Giants player has worn number 25 since Barry’s final season.  It’s time to officially retire his number in honor of his remarkable 22-year career as one of the greatest players of all time and for his countless achievements and contributions as a Giant,” said Giants president and CEO Laurence M. Baer.  “Barry grew up with the Giants and followed in the footsteps of his Godfather Willie Mays and another Giant legend who also wore number 25 -- his late father,  Bobby.  By officially retiring number 25, we will not only pay tribute to Barry as the greatest player of his generation, but also honor the legacy of two of the greatest players to ever wear a Giants uniform.”

“I’m both honored and humbled that the Giants are going to retire my number this season.  As I’ve always said, the Giants and Giants fans, are a part of my family. Growing up, Candlestick Park was my home away from home, and it is where my dad and godfather Willie played.  For me to have played on the same field as them, wear the same uniform and now have my number retired, joining Willie and the other Giants legends is extremely special.  Number 25 has meant a lot to me throughout my career and it is even more special that I got to share that with my dad,” said Bonds.

Bonds, who currently serves in the Giants front office as a Special Advisor, signed with the Giants in 1993.  He spent his final 15 Major League seasons in a San Francisco uniform, compiling a .312 batting average with 381 doubles, 41 triples, 586 home runs and 1,440 RBI in 1,976 games. He can be found throughout the SF-era record books, ranking in the top 10 for batting average (first), games (third), at-bats (third – 6,263), runs (first - 1,555), hits (third - 1,951), doubles (first), triples (fourth), home runs (first), RBI (first), stolen bases (first - 263) and walks (first - 1,947).

Bonds won seven NL MVP awards, eight Gold Glove awards and received 14 All-Star selections during his storied 22-year Major League career with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1986-92) and San Francisco Giants (1993-2007). He was a two-time winner of the National League batting title and the lone member of baseball’s 500 homer-500 steal club holds Major League Baseball’s all-time records for home runs (762) and walks (2,558).

San Francisco Giants media services

Jeff Samardzija placed back on the DL with shoulder injury

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USATSI

Jeff Samardzija placed back on the DL with shoulder injury

SAN FRANCISCO -- It was clear on Saturday night that Jeff Samardzija still isn't right. On Sunday morning, Samardzija was put back on the disabled list. 

The right-hander lasted just four innings against the A's with diminished velocity and poor command, and afterward admitted that he had trouble getting and staying loose during the start. That has been an issue for Samardzija going back to spring training, and he will spend the final day before the break getting examined by team doctors and undergoing another MRI. 

Manager Bruce Bochy said he did not know what's next for Samardzija. He likely will need another extended break, although surgery has not yet been discussed. Bochy said Samardzija will throw a bullpen session at some point after the break to see if his shoulder has improved. He will get treatment throughout the All-Star break. 

Samardzija missed 18 games at the start of the season and then 35 more after he tried to return. Bochy credited him with trying to stay on the field and pitching through pain. 

"He's such a competitor," Bochy said. "He wants to be out there. He willed his way through four innings yesterday, I think."

To take the roster spot, the Giants added Kelby Tomlinson to the roster. Derek Holland likely will take the rotation spot after the break, although the Giants do not need a fifth starter right away because they're off after three games in Oakland next weekend. 

Giants have decision to make after Samardzija's shoulder acts up again

Giants have decision to make after Samardzija's shoulder acts up again

SAN FRANCISCO — Before the start of this three-game series, manager Bruce Bochy was asked whether he was ready to announce his second half rotation. Bochy was not, noting that he wanted to get through these three games. After the second game against the A’s, a 4-3 loss, he admitted that there’s now a discussion that needs to be had before any decisions are made public. 

Jeff Samardzija’s second start back from the disabled list was a step backwards. The right-hander admitted that he had trouble keeping his pitching shoulder loose, an issue that recently put him on the disabled list for 35 games. After that long layoff, Samardzija insisted he felt great. Clearly he does not, and the Giants have to decide when he’ll make his next start, or if he even will. 

“We’ll talk about it. We’ll talk about what we think is best,” Bochy said. “I’ll talk to Jeff on how he felt and how he feels tomorrow. He wants to be out there, but you can tell he was a little off tonight.”

Samardzija backed that point, answering a question about his health by talking about how much fun he’s having with this team and how he wants to contribute. But the Giants do not have much margin for error, and the first six innings Saturday seemed to indicate an intriguing choice moving forward. 

Samardzija gave up two runs on three hits and two walks in four innings, and only an impressive Steven Duggar catch in the gap kept it from being worse. Derek Holland, the man waiting in the wings, struck out the first five hitters he faced while throwing two scoreless innings of relief. 

Samardzija threw just 29 of 55 pitches for strikes and got three swings-and-misses. Holland got eight in much more limited time, throwing 19 of 26 pitches for strikes. Samardzija is known as the flamethrower, but his fastball maxed out at just 92.5 mph and he averaged around 90 mph with the pitch, which is 94-95 when most effective. Holland threw his fastest pitch of the season, a 94.7 mph fastball to Matt Olson, and averaged 93.3 mph with his heater. 

The timing lines up well for the Giants if they're ready to make a change. They have four days off, then three in Oakland, where Samardzija certainly would not be asked to pitch. After that, there’s an off day. If the Giants want to get creative or give Samardzija an extended breather, now is the time. Given his diminished velocity and lack of command, it’s apparent something needs to be done. 

“It’s a process right now,” Samardzija said. “(The shoulder) didn’t warm up quite the way we wanted it to. You go out there and do what you can do with what you’ve got. I’m not making excuses.”

Samardzija did keep the Giants in the game, and they had a shot even in the ninth. Blake Treinen, whose sinker is as nasty as it gets, walked a pair with two outs, but Brandon Crawford struck out. The inning was missing one component. Brandon Belt would have been due up second, but he was ejected after the fourth for arguing a check-swing call. Belt had been rung up by third base umpire Greg Gibson in the bottom of the inning on a questionable call. He argued as he took his position in the top of the fifth. Bochy said he would talk to Belt. 

“At some point, you’ve got to let it go,” he said. “Once he went out there and started arguing again, you’re going to get thrown out. That can’t happen in a game like this.”