Giants

Giants

There are plenty of reasons for baseball fans to be smiling right now. A new season is here as 30 teams have their sights set on October, already in April.
 
In the offseason, teams continued to lure in some of the most sought after arms in the game, with mountains of money. The Giants alone spent $220 million on two starting pitchers -- Johnny Cueto and Jeff Samardzija -- after they missed last season's playoffs with hope of more even-year magic. 
 
While some of these pitchers whose bank accounts now look like Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory performed exceptionally well this spring, others saw their numbers look far from what their dollar figures would suggest. 
 
[RELATED: By the numbers: Dissecting what spring training stats mean]
 
Here's how the top 10 highest paid free agent starting pitchers produced in spring training: 
 
David Price, Boston Red Sox (7 years, $217 million)
 
4 GS, 1-1, 2.81 ERA, 16.0 IP, 15 SO
 
Zack Greinke, Arizona Diamondbacks (6 years, $206.5 million)
 
4 GS, 1-0, 1.88 ERA, 14.1 IP, 11 SO
 
Johnny Cueto, San Francisco Giants (6 years, $130 million)
 
3 GS, 1-2, 9.58 ERA, 10.1 IP, 10 SO
 
Jordan Zimmermann, Detroit Tigers (5 years, $110 million)
 
3 GS, 1-0, 4.82 ERA, 9.1 IP, 8 SO
 
Kenta Maeda, Los Angeles Dodgers (8 years, $25 million *Up to $106.2 million in incentives)
 
6 GS, 1-2, 2.35 ERA, 23 IP, 20 SO
 
Jeff Samardzija, San Francisco Giants (5 years, $90 million)
 
7 GS, 2-3, 6.00 ERA, 30 IP, 21 SO
 
Wei-Yin Chen, Miami Marlins (5 years, $80 million)
 
2 GS, 0-1, 6.00 ERA, 6.0 IP, 1 SO
 
Mike Leake, St. Louis Cardinals (5 years, $80 million)
 
5 GS, 1-1, 2.25 ERA, 20 IP, 24 SO
 
Ian Kennedy, Kansas City Royals (5 years, $70 million)
 
6 GS, 0-3, 6.30 ERA, 20.0 IP, 22 SO
 
Scott Kazmir, Los Angeles Dodgers (3 years, $48 million)
 
5 GS, 0-1, 5.51 ERA, 16.1 IP, 16 SO
 
Pitching was in high demand in the offseason as offensive power numbers continued to look nothing but ordinary last season. On the other side, stats for pitchers resembled more and more a time of Bob Gibson's 1.12 ERA in 1968.
 
Who now has the best rotation in baseball? How much do spring stats even matter? All questions are unknowns with early answers soon to be concluded. 
 
Each of these arms will be watched closely by plenty of people with the regular season now upon us.