Giants

Report: Giants discussed Panik, top prospects in potential Stanton trade

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AP

Report: Giants discussed Panik, top prospects in potential Stanton trade

On Monday morning, some important details emerged.

The Giants discussed Joe Panik and top prospects Tyler Beede and Chris Shaw with the Marlins in a potential trade for Giancarlo Stanton, according to sports radio host Craig Mish.

Last week, San Francisco reportedly made an actual offer for Stanton.

The Giants selected Beede, 24, in the first round (14th overall) of the 2014 draft.

The right-handed pitcher went 6-7 with a 4.79 ERA over 19 starts in Triple-A last season.

[RELATED: Healthy Tyler Beede shows why he's Giants' top pitching prospect]

The Orange and Black took Shaw, 24, in the first round (31st overall) of the 2015 draft.

In 37 games for Double-A Richmond in 2017, he hit .301 with six home runs and 29 RBI.

He was promoted to Triple-A and hit .289 with 18 home runs and 50 RBI in 88 games.

Shaw recently played in the Arizona Fall League, but only saw action in five games because of a sore shoulder.

How current, former MLB players used baseball to help Sonoma County wildfire victims

How current, former MLB players used baseball to help Sonoma County wildfire victims

The North Bay wildfires forever changed wine country.

The devastating flames left thousands of people homeless, and even more permanently affected by the aftermath. As the rebuilding process continues, it’s small moments and gestures that help a community find a sense of normalcy. One of those moments happened on a rainy January morning in Santa Rosa, Calif.

Led by the tandem of Kasey Olenberger and former Giants pitcher Noah Lowry, both current and former MLB players gathered to hold a baseball clinic for children affected by the North Bay willdfires. Kids were treated to free baseball gear, exclusive memorabilia, and 1-on-1 instruction from some of the best baseball players on the planet.

For many, it was a chance to forget about all they had lost to that October blaze. For those more fortunate, this was a way to give back to a region that so badly needed something to smile about.

The youngsters who were there probably won’t make it to the big leagues. Many might not even remember the baseball lessons they learned that day. But they will never forget the day that the baseball community took the time to make them feel special.

And while the memories of these awful fires will never leave them, neither will the memory of this wonderful day.

Watch below for the full feature video: 

Giants rookie Steven Duggar delivers in first duel against Clayton Kershaw

Giants rookie Steven Duggar delivers in first duel against Clayton Kershaw

LOS ANGELES — The Giants will face three left-handed starters in this series, and before the first game, manager Bruce Bochy talked of getting some extra work for right-handed-hitting outfielders Gorkys Hernandez and Hunter Pence. A date with Clayton Kershaw seemed a good opportunity to do that, but Bochy instead let rookie Steven Duggar get his first look at the future Hall-of-Famer. 

“I think his at-bats against lefties have been pretty good. He’s got discipline. I’m fine putting him out there,” Bochy said. “He’s going to be playing in games like this, so this is going to be good for him.”

The Giants envision Duggar as their center fielder and leadoff hitter of the future. Ideally, he’ll be capable of starting everyday against lefties and righties, no matter the caliber of opposing arm. Ideally, he’ll also be starting in some pretty important games down the line, and Kershaw vs. Bumgarner at Dodger Stadium was a nice taste of a “big game” feel. 

Duggar said he talked to a few teammates about what it’s like to face Kershaw, but mostly he relied on his own instincts and research. 

“It’s just developing a plan after watching video of past starts and looking at numbers and things of that nature,” he said. “It came to fruition for a couple of at-bats there, so that’s good.”

Duggar’s goal was not to fall behind in counts. That didn’t last long. His first time up, Duggar swung at a first-pitch fastball and then got a big curveball for strike two. But he poked a high fastball up the middle and beat Brian Dozier’s throw to first. Kershaw caught Duggar leaning off first, but he was speedy enough to make it to second before Cody Bellinger’s throw to the bag. 

Duggar didn’t wait around the next time. He got a first-pitch fastball in the sixth and smoked it into right-center. Two batters later, he scored. 

“I did want to be aggressive, but be aggressive on certain pitches,” Duggar said. “I knew his curveball was going to be really tough. I just stuck to my plan and had a good idea of what I wanted to do … just trust (the plan) and try to get the barrel to the ball.”

Of course, this is Kershaw, and eventually he’s going to get to his plan, too. Kershaw quickly jumped ahead 0-2 in their final matchup and threw a wicked slider down and a way for a strikeout. Duggar said the stuff lived up to the hype. 

“He’s Clayton Kershaw for a reason,” he said. “He does not miss his spots often. Every pitch he makes, there’s a purpose behind it.”

The Giants have learned that all too well over the years. Kershaw has a 1.58 ERA against them and few Giants have even an average career line when facing him. Bochy knew that, so he gave his newest starter a shot to prove he belongs. On Monday night, Duggar delivered.