Kings

Kings player profile: Can Dewayne Dedmon stay healthy enough to contribute?

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Kings player profile: Can Dewayne Dedmon stay healthy enough to contribute?

Continuity is big in the NBA, but Dedmon brings a very specific skill set that should help the Kings, and more specifically, Bagley, take another step forward. He can do a lot of what Cauley-Stein brought to the table, but his ability to shoot from the perimeter and defend the rim are major upgrades at the position.

He’s also a veteran player that’s been around the block and can provide another mature voice behind the scenes.

Strengths

A late bloomer, Dedmon has progressively gotten better in each of his six seasons in the NBA. He’s bounced around the league, but he’s hopefully found a home on the Kings’ frontline, at least for the next two or three years. 

Dedmon shot just one 3-point attempt through his first four seasons in the league and then Atlanta happened. It started under coach Mike Budenholzer and then continued when Lloyd Pierce took over the Hawks.

During the 2017-18 season, Dedmon shot 35.5 percent on 2.3 3-point attempts per game. Those numbers jumped to 38.2 percent on 3.4 attempts per game last season, which is a big reason why the Kings chased him in free agency.

When Dedmon isn’t shooting from the perimeter, he is typically used as the lob man in the pick-n-roll. He shot 70.1 percent at the rim on 129 makes. 104 of those conversions were assisted. 

As a rebounder, Dedmon has posted seasons where he is an elite defensive rebounder, finishing with 30.6 percent, 28.1 percent and 25 percent over the last three seasons. The development of Jon Collins last season likely caused a dip in his numbers, but there is potential for him to be one of the Kings’ best rebounders per minute once the season starts, specifically on the defensive end.

His offensive rebounding numbers have fallen off a cliff over the past two seasons, but that is directly correlated with his increase in 3-point attempts. On the offensive end, he will be asked to camp in the corner on plenty of sets, which will help space the floor for both De’Aaron Fox and Marvin Bagley.

On the defensive side of the ball, Dedmon is active. His 1.1 blocks per game would have led the Kings last season and his 1.1 steals per game is .1 less than what Cauley-Stein averaged. He held his opponents to a -1 percent field goal percent overall, including -1.5 percent from 3-point range and -5 percent inside of six feet.

Weaknesses

Dedmon has struggled to stay healthy over the last two seasons, missing 20 games in 2017-18 and 18 during last season. He’s a young 30 as far as games played, posting just 350 regular-season games, including 176 starts, but he needs to stay on the court.

He’s limited in what he does, but that might not be a bad thing. The Kings don’t plan to run the offense through him and there is a possibility that he will see an increase in 3-point attempts while starting on the frontline with Bagley. 

The Kings need Dedmon to get back to the player that posted +30 percent defensive rebounding percentages. With Bagley hitting the break as a rim runner, there will be opportunities for him that he may not have had in Atlanta. He needs to be a force on the defensive glass. 

Dedmon shot a sparkling 81.4 percent from the free-throw line, but he made it to the stripe just 113 times. He’s not a focal point of the offense, but drawing and playing through contact is important, especially when he has the ability to knock down freebies at such a high clip.

Sacramento needs its new center to be a rim protector. His 1.1 blocks per game were a career-best and the Kings need that number and maybe a little more this season.

Path to Improvement

Shoot the 3-ball. Stay healthy. Block shots. Crush the glass. 

The Kings aren’t trying to invent the wheel when it comes to Dedmon. They chased him in free agency because he is a perfect fit next to Bagley. 

His path to improvement is to do more of what he already does. He doesn’t need to learn any new tricks. If he can average one more 3-point and free throw attempts per game, hit the defensive glass hard and play goalkeeper, the Kings spent their money on the right guy. 

Playing closer to 75 games would be an added bonus.

Projection

Dedmon is going to start the season as the starter, but there are plenty of young bodies ready to steal his minutes. He’ll likely split time with Harry Giles early in the season, but Richaun Holmes is part of the equation as well.

[RELATED: Is Bagley ready to take leap in sophomore season?]

An early prediction has Dedmon averaging 10 points, eight rebounds, a block and a steal in 24 minutes per game. He’ll shoot plenty of triples and be asked to do the dirty work. 

If he stumbles, the Kings have replacements in the pipeline. If those young options don’t show the type of improvement the team needs to see, Dedmon could be asked to play closer to 30 minutes per game. 

Buddy Hield contract extension talks cast momentary dark cloud over Kings

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Buddy Hield contract extension talks cast momentary dark cloud over Kings

SACRAMENTO -- "Hello darkness, my old friend. I’ve come to talk with you again."

Whether it’s the soothing harmonies of Simon and Garfunkel or the powerful bellowing of Disturbed frontman David Draiman, the opening lines of the "Sound of Silence" are ringing in my ears.

For more than a decade, drama finds the Sacramento Kings, whether they are looking for it or not. Often times the wounds are self-inflicted. Every once in a while, the issues are nothing more than the complexities of the NBA playing out in real-time.

Buddy Hield wants his money. His agent says so. He says so. Twitter says so.

Hield’s team has gone on the record with the number of $110 million over four-years to seal the deal. The Kings will not confirm whether the reported four-year, $90 million figure that has been put out there is top end for the team.

Sacramento had a similar situation last season when big man Willie Cauley-Stein went public with his wishes to get paid. Again, the two situations are similar ... but really they aren’t.

Hield accomplished last season what Cauley-Stein never could in purple and black. He lived up to his lottery billing and became a consistent impact player on the court for the Kings.

Part of the team’s exciting young core, Hield has made it his offseason mission to get locked up long term. In doing so, he is making things as uncomfortable as possible for general manager Vlade Divac and his staff.

Will it work? Will slaying the drama mean more to the franchise than the long term financial flexibility they have worked so hard to build? That is the $110 million question.

The Kings are on the clock and Hield has started to get personal.

The talented shooting guard has asked for what he believes is fair, but the value is in the eye of the beholder. During his post-game comments on Wednesday evening, he invoked two separate ideas that take aim at not only the franchise but his standing amongst his teammates as well.

"Name one big free agent that came to Sacramento," Hield told the larger media scrum. "I've been here three years trying to grow the program, grow the organization and I feel like I could be rewarded close to that. But that's just me. That's my gut feeling."

Long an NBA outpost, the good people of Sacramento, regardless of who is running the franchise, know where they stand in the tall pecking order of the league. Landing an 'A list' free agent has never been on the table.

While it’s a matter for some debate, Divac himself is likely the top free agent the team has brought in during the team’s 35 years in Sacramento. The franchise has found success bringing back their own big-name free agents, like Mitch Richmond, Chris Webber and Mike Bibby. But they haven’t been able to crack into the superstar free-agent market.

That leaves the franchise with two options: Draft potential stars and hope for the best or acquire talent via trade and hope for the best.

Hield is a combination of both. Sacramento didn’t draft him, but they traded for him during his rookie season and spent the last three seasons helping to develop him into the player he is today.

In addition to taking a shot at a sensitive issue for the franchise he plays for, Hield went where most players don’t want to go. He compared himself to his teammates and what might happen for them in the near future.

“It’s all about value and where they see me as a player and of course, if another young player comes up and they give them what they want, it shows how much they value me,” Hield told NBC Sports California following the main media scrum.

Hield is pointing directly at the franchise and how they might value De’Aaron Fox and Marvin Bagley. Creating a list of who mom and dad like the best doesn’t work for siblings. In the NBA world, it’s a good way to get your feelings hurt.

Speaking to people within the walls of the Golden 1 Center, they understand that all of this is part of the process.

They still love Buddy Hield. They still view him as a big part of the franchise. This is just another day out of many in the history of the Kings and it too shall pass.

It should also be noted that Hield is fighting to stay in a Kings' uniform. He is asking the team to lock him up for the next five seasons in Sacramento so he can put permanent roots. He has visions of buying a house in the area and making this his NBA home. 

Between now and Oct. 21, Hield will either get an extension or he won’t. He is emotional about the process. He wants financial stability. He wants respect. He wants to know that he is just as important to the recent success of the franchise as anyone else. All of this is understandable.

[RELATED: Kings, Hield $20M apart in contract extension talks]

At the end of the day, this is a negotiation. The NBA is a business and it shouldn’t get personal. If a deal doesn’t get done now, the two sides have another bite at the apple at the end of the season.

The next few days building to the deadline could get wild, but like so many other situations with the Kings, the darkness will pass soon enough. A resolution, one way or another, will happen and the focus will shift to basketball and the task at hand.

Kings' De'Aaron Fox voted fastest, most likely to break out by NBA GMs

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Kings' De'Aaron Fox voted fastest, most likely to break out by NBA GMs

The 2019-20 NBA season is closely upon us, which has general managers around the league voting for their favorites to lead in respective categories.

The Kings were not left unnoticed. Especially with De'Aaron Fox, who is anticipated to have a coming out party.

The young point guard received 19 percent of votes as the player most likely to have a breakout season, as well as an impressive 64 percent of votes saying Fox was the fastest with the ball.

Fox's speed has been the highlight of what he brings to the court. He even put weight on this summer and consumed 4,000-5,000 calories because he would burn through them so fast.

[RELATED: Kings social media takes shot at Lakers]

The Kings themselves are a team that wants to push the ball, so it's a win-win scenario all around.

Fox is being called the fastest guy in basketball, both by himself and his peers, and it's nice to see him getting the recognition he deserves.