Mistah F.A.B. heard Damian Lillard’s Marvin Bagley diss track, and knew exactly what the Trail Blazers star was doing.

“Dame’s just telling business, man, he’s just representing,” the Oakland-based rap impresario told NBC Sports Bay Area’s Logan Murdock on Thursday. “… That’s Dame Dolla, man. He just straight ran Town business.”

“Town business” meant Lillard answering Bagley’s morning challenge with afternoon heat, and F.A.B. explained what had to be in the Oakland native’s mind as he recorded, then dropped the song that also dropped jaws across the NBA.

“You just go in battle mode, man,” F.A.B. said. “You want to make sure you come with some bars, you want to make sure that you respond -- each bar’s pointed, but you get your point across. He got his point across, man.

“He talked about how he felt, you know what I mean? He was like, Big Bank take Little Bank. I’m a couple hundred mil. This is a field day. Basically like, c’mon, man, you don’t want these bars. You don’t want this problem.”

F.A.B. said he knew Lillard had the goods “when I first heard him rap,” and his eyes really opened when he saw the Blazers star’s now-famous freestyle on Sway’s SiriusXM Radio morning show in 2015.

 

F.A.B. believes Lillard might be the best athlete rapper ever, and has pointed advice for anyone who might challenge him again.

“You just better make it count. You got to make it count,” F.A.B. said. “Battle rap is like sports in a way -- on any given night, anyone can be beat. All it takes is for one battle, one bar, and somebody could steal the whole momentum of the crowd and whatnot, you know? … You just got to come correct.”

[RELATED: Dame, Draymond's mom disagreed on one major point]

Most people believe Bagley didn’t do that Thursday, and F.A.B. sees the quality of Lillard and his Oakland upbringing.

“Dame’s just cool. Dame’s a real class act, man,” F.A.B. said. “He’s just so professional. It’s a reflection of how he was raised, his parents -- he’s got great parents, good structure. He really comes from that life, though. He don’t got to do nothing extra, you know what I mean? When you really come from the life that a lot of people be trying to exaggerate [about], to be, to make it seem like they’re really from, then they do the most. …

“He got it honest, though. His job, man, was just to go play basketball and change the narrative, and that’s what he did, man. That’s why he’s so humble, so respected. He know where he come from.”