NCAA

Cal 1B Andrew Vaughn caps monster season by winning Golden Spikes Award

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CAL ATHLETICS

Cal 1B Andrew Vaughn caps monster season by winning Golden Spikes Award

LOS ANGELES – One of the most prolific seasons in Cal baseball history has earned Andrew Vaughn a spot among the elite names ever to play the game on the amateur level as he has been named the Golden Spikes Award winner by USA Baseball and the Rod Dedeaux Foundation.

The award, which has been given to the nation’s top amateur player annually since 1978, is considered one of the highest honors a college baseball player can earn. The announcement came as part of ESPN’s SportsCenter telecast on Thursday afternoon with three of the four finalists – Vaughn, Texas infielder Kody Clemens and Auburn pitcher Casey Mize – in studio at ESPN Los Angeles.

Vaughn is the first Cal baseball player to earn the honor and is only the second to be named a finalist, joining Lance Blankenship (1984). He is the eighth Pac-12 player to bring home the award and joins a group that includes UCLA’s Trevor Bauer (2011), Washington's Tim Lincecum (2006), USC's Mark Prior (2001), Arizona State's Mike Kelly (1991), Oddibe McDowell (1984) and Bob Horner (1978) and Arizona's Terry Francona (1980). 

The announcement came live on SportsCenter at ESPN’s Los Angeles studios. After being announced as the winner, Vaughn was joined on set by his parents, Toby and Diana, along with his sister, Madison, and Cal head coach Mike Neu. 

From a statistical standpoint, the award is certainly deserved for the native of Santa Rosa, Calif. after he turned in one of the greatest single seasons in Cal baseball history.

A sophomore first baseman, Vaughn started all 54 games and hit .402, a mark that ranks third in Cal single-season history. His 23 home runs tied the single-season record set by Xavier Nady in 1999 and his slugging percentage of .819 is the best in school history. 

He also drove in 63 runs, walked 44 times, got hit by a pitch 12 times and struck out only 18 times. His on-base percentage of .531 ranks fourth in the nation. Vaughn was also one of the conference's best defenders at his position, compiling a fielding percentage of .992 and earning a spot on the Pac-12 All-Defensive team.

The announcement came as part of a two-day trip to Los Angeles for Vaughn, who has stayed busy since the end of the collegiate season. Beginning the summer as a member of the Wareham Gatemen in the Cape Cod League, Vaughn left New England as the league leader in both home runs (5) and RBI (14) after 14 games played.

Before heading to Southern California, he moved down the East Coast to Cary, N.C. to begin his second stint with the USA Baseball Collegiate National Team. International play begins for Team USA on June 28 when Chinese Taipei visits for a five-game series. The team will also take on Japan and Cuba as play extends into mid-July.

Cal Athletics provided this report.

Coronavirus: NCAA cancels men's and women's March Madness tournaments

Coronavirus: NCAA cancels men's and women's March Madness tournaments

There will be no NCAA Tournament games at the Golden 1 Center in Sacramento or anywhere else. 

Amid concerns over the spread of the coronavirus, the NCAA announced Thursday it was canceling the men's and women's basketball tournaments as well as all other winter and spring championships. 

Golden 1 Center was slated to host the first and second-rounds of the tournament. On Wednesday, the NCAA announced it would hold games without fans in attendance, but as the number of cases continues to rise, Emmert made the prudent choice to cancel the tournament Thursday.

This comes a day after the NBA suspended its season for the foreseeable future after Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert tested positive for COVID-19. On Thursday, the NHL, MLB and MLS suspended or delayed their seasons for varying lengths of time. 

Major college conference tournaments began Tuesday and were set to go through the week until selection Sunday. Most conferences canceled their tournaments early Thursday morning prior to the NCAA's decision to cancel the tournaments. 

This will be the first year since 1938 without a Final Four. 

[RELATED: NBA, G League suspend season amid coronavirus outbreak]

On Wednesday, the World Health Organization labeled the coronavirus as a pandemic. As of Thursday, over 1,300 people in the United States had contracted the virus and 39 had died, according to the Centers or Disease Control, state health officials and NBC News. 

Katie Ledecky was face of USA swimming before starring at Stanford

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USATSI

Katie Ledecky was face of USA swimming before starring at Stanford

In 2012, Katie Ledecky burst onto the scene as a 15-year-old swimming phenom at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London. Ledecky won gold by blowing away the field in the 800-meter freestyle.

She returned to Olympic glory in 2016, winning four gold medals and a silver in Rio.

Already an established swimming star, Ledecky went Stanford to swim for one of the nation's premier programs. During her freshman season, she set 12 NCAA records and nine American records while leading Stanford to its first team title since 1998. She followed that up a year by setting three more NCAA records, two more American records and helping the Cardinal win another crown. She decided to forgo her final two years at Stanford to turn pro because well ... she's Katie Ledecky.

Learn more about one of the world's best swimmers in this piece from NBC Sports Washington:

Ledecky took the mantle from Michael Phelps as the face of American swimming and has been a dominant force in the pool ever since. She swept gold medals in the 200-, 400- and 800-meter freestyle in 2016, setting world records in both the 400 and 800.

In the 2014 and 2015 Pan Pacific Championships, Ledecky won the 200-, 400-, 800- and 1500-meter freestyle races. Winning all four now is known as the "Ledecky Slam." The 1500 wasn't on the docket at the 2016 Rio games, but it will be this summer in Tokyo, where the American star can try and add an Olympic "Ledecky Slam" to her belt.