NCAA

From feeding homeless to doing the splits, Stanford's Phillips a rare find

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From feeding homeless to doing the splits, Stanford's Phillips a rare find

Stanford has a penchant for recruiting the overachieving student-athlete. Even among those standards, Harrison Phillips is a rare find. The senior defensive tackle helps feed the homeless every Friday morning at a local shelter. He often visits the kids in the oncology ward at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He was named to the Pac-12 All Academic First Team and will graduate in December with a double major and a minor. He is a team captain and heir apparent to Solomon Thomas, the 49ers third overall pick in this year’s NFL draft.

“One thing you love about Harrison is, every day he’s going to get something done,” head coach David Shaw told NBC Sports Bay Area. “On the field, off the field, in the community, he’s always got a million things going on. But nothing ever suffers.

"He does everything at a high level.”

At 6-foot-4, 290 pounds, Phillips is a mountain of a man. His skill set is different than that of Thomas, but he can be just as disruptive. He plays over the center. He plays over the guards. His self-proclaimed job is to eat as many blocks as possible to keep the linebackers free.

“He’s such that hard point for us. He’s that guy up front that’s getting knock back, that force in the run game that you gotta have,” defensive coordinator Lance Anderson explained. “You have to have that strong solid point in the middle of your defense, and he provides that.”

Phillips had a game-high 11 tackles, five of them solo, in the Cardinal’s loss to USC. No other defensive lineman on the field had more than three.

“He’s outstanding against the run. He’s a very good pass rusher,” Shaw added. “He’s got a lot of tools that can work inside.”

Phillips main instruments of domination are strength, knowledge of leverage and abnormal flexibility for a man of his size.

“He can do the splits on command,” Thomas said laughing from in front of his locker after a recent 49ers practice. “He loves showing it off. We get on him for it. But he loves doing it.

And, according to Thomas, his former Stanford teammate loves to bench. So it comes as no surprise that Phillips’ upper body strength stands out.

“He’ll be really low in a position that you think he’d get knocked over in,” Thomas explained. “Because of how flexible he is, it’s not a problem for him to get in that position and stay there and move on from there. It definitely shows up on his film.”

No doubt, Phillips says, that ability comes from his wrestling experience. His high school curriculum vitae includes, “Nebraska State Wrestling Champion, Heavy Weight Division, Sophomore, Junior and Senior years.”

Phillips first year on The Farm, he vividly remembers his Stanford coaches testing him. Just a mere 245 pounds at the time, they put him up against Joshua Garnett and Andrus Peat, two offensive linemen now in the NFL and each well over 300 pounds.

“They’d double team me, almost 700 pounds on you, and I would somehow find leverage and be able to sit on some of those double teams,” Phillips said. “I think the violence that wrestling brings, and balance and being comfortable in weird positions, wrestling has a ton of scrambling, as it's called, you just know your body and know what you can do. I have tremendous flexibility, and I use everything to my advantage.”

One thing Phillips is not allowed to do is use his explosiveness away from the football field. At one time, Phillips could do a back flip off the wall, but he no longer attempts it.

“I’m not a big fan of the back hand springs,” Shaw said. “I’d like for him to stay on his feet.”

Phillips doesn’t argue. He lost his entire sophomore year to a knee injury, and doesn’t want to risk another. He has NFL aspirations and put himself in position to graduate in three-and-a-half years should he choose to enter the 2018 draft. But just as he has done at Stanford, he is looking to be more than just a name on a jersey should he play on a professional level.

“I want to build something that is really lasting,” Phillips said of his life goal, “and put my name on something to touch people’s lives and change people’s lives, pay it forward as much as I can.”

Kyler Murray suffers first loss as OU starting QB in wild Red River Rivalry

Kyler Murray suffers first loss as OU starting QB in wild Red River Rivalry

Kyler Murray never lost a Texas high school football game, going 42-0 as a prep with three straight state championships. He can't say the same about being a starting quarterback in the Red River Rivalry. 

Playing in front of his home state at the University of Texas, Murray found himself on the other side of one of the biggest rivalries in college football. And a last-second Texas field goal put an end to his and Oklahoma's perfect record this season. 

That doesn't mean Murray didn't continue his Heisman campaign in the 48-45 loss. 

[JOHNSON: A's top pick Kyler Murray always envisioned himself as a two-sport star]

Murray, the Sooners quarterback and A's top draft pick last June, threw for 304 yards and four touchdowns. On the ground, Murray rushed for another 92 yards and a touchdown on 11 carries. He did have mistakes with one interception and one fumble. 

Looking to pull off a two-touchdown comeback, Murray made plays like this with his arm. 

That wasn't even close to his biggest highlight of the day. Down 45-31 with 5:21 left, Murray showed off his blazing wheels for perhaps the best run of this college football season. 

Through six games, Murray now has 1,764 passing yards with 21 touchdowns through the air to three interceptions. He's been just as impressive using his legs, rushing for 377 yards and five more scores.

Last season during his Heisman campaign, Baker Mayfield, who Murray replaced at Oklahoma, total 1,937 passing yards through six games with 17 touchdowns and one interception. He also had 101 yards on the ground and one more score. 

Comparing the two, Murray (2,141) has 103 more total yards than Mayfield did in 2017 through the first six games, and eight more touchdowns.

If Murray is wearing an A's jersey in a few years, don't blink with him on the base paths. 

Former Cal star Jabari Bird arrested for domestic incident, kidnapping

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USATSI

Former Cal star Jabari Bird arrested for domestic incident, kidnapping

BOSTON — Boston Celtics guard Jabari Bird is facing several charges following a domestic incident in which a victim was injured, police said.

Bird, a second-round draft choice of the Celtics in 2017, signed a two-year contract with the team this summer after splitting his rookie season between Boston and the Maine Red Claws of the G-League.

“Jabari Bird is currently being guarded by the Boston Police at a local hospital for an evaluation after a domestic incident that occurred in Brighton on Friday,” the department said in a brief statement Saturday. “The victim involved in the incident was also transported to a separate hospital for treatment of injuries sustained.”

Police said complaints would be sought against Bird for assault and battery, strangulation and kidnapping. He could be arraigned as early as Monday in Brighton District Court. Brighton is a neighborhood of Boston.

No other details were immediately released.

“We are aware of the incident involving Jabari Bird and are taking it very seriously,” the Celtics said in a statement on Saturday. “We are actively gathering information and will reserve further comment at this time.”

A message left with Bird’s agent, Aaron Goodwin, was not immediately returned.

Bird, 24, played his college basketball at California where he earned All-Pac-12 Honorable Mention honors and led the Golden Bears in scoring in his final season at the school.

He appeared in 13 regular-season games for the Celtics last season, averaging 3.0 points per game.