Raiders

Futuristic, transforming stadiums offer intriguing solution in Oakland

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AS Roma stadium rendering

Futuristic, transforming stadiums offer intriguing solution in Oakland

New Oakland A’s President Dave Kaval knew that fans would be floating ideas past him at the first open session at his new Coliseum office. Indeed, Ibbi Almufti proposed that Kaval should explore building a floating stadium for the A’s in San Francisco Bay. 

Hotel kingpin Barron Hilton 52 years ago proposed a floating San Diego Stadium for the Padres. In 1963 the lure of the seas hit Seattle with a plan that never left port, proposing a seaworthy stadium for football and baseball.

If you think this is fiction, renowned architectural firm Gensler has proposed "Project Poseidon," a temporary floating home away from home on the River Thames for the Palace of Westminster while the original House of Parliament is refurbished. After all, it’s been around since 1835 and could use a facelift.

When the Giants were struggling to find a post-Candlestick home, several proposals had them on a barge ballpark sailing around the bay. Talk about "splash hits."

I’m no naval engineer, but the closest structure to a floating stadium in Northern California is actually the Oakland Alameda County Coliseum, which is 21 feet below sea level and has a sizeable aquifer underneath the playing field. 

The A’s are said to be looking seriously at Howard Terminal. Before they swim up that stream, though, they should spend time with Warriors and the 87 government agencies that would be involved in approving a new Howard Terminal ballpark.

The Raiders and A’s have been out to sea for years trying to develop new single-use stadiums. The Raiders face a $1.2 billion stadium valuation based on the recent deal between the Ronnie Lott-led group and the city. The A’s are still investigating ballpark sites. Oakland, Alameda County and the state will provide little or no hard cash investment for either team’s single use new home.

You can forget about a single-use stadium cruising the bay. But advances in architectural design, construction materials, modular manipulation, hydraulics, computer-driven infrastructure, robotics, LED technology, field composition and new funding mechanisms have created an opportunity to explore a brave new world of multi-purpose stadiums and arenas.

We are on the technological path to venues that can morph from one sport to another without compromising the fan experience. Think of the possibility of stadiums as sports and entertainment transformers.

ANZ Stadium in Sydney, Australia, allows for movement of the grandstand to allow for a change of playing field -- both shape and type. It can accommodate cricket, Aussie Rules Football, rugby, soccer, American football, and baseball. University of Phoenix Stadium has fields that move in and out of the stadium through a hydraulic system. The Giants and Jets are making piles of cash sharing Metlife Stadium. The Cowboys' AT&T Stadium, with the world’s largest HD video board, has changed the way that fans consume live sports.

A different take on the multi-purpose concept can be seen in the Saitama Super Arena in Japan and Arena 92, a stadium set to open in 2017 near Paris. Both venues are fully enclosed stadiums that can accommodate field and indoor court sports. Both the Super Arena and Arena 92 feature movable seating blocks that allow each facility to serve as an appropriately sized venue for either field or court sports.

Now is the perfect time to go back to the future and create the new multi-purpose stadium that is dictated in these challenging economic times. That opportunity exists on the current site of the Oakland Alameda County Coliseum.

Does anyone have Elon Musk or Stephen Hawking’s cell number?

Four Raiders players to watch in Saturday's preseason game vs. Rams

Four Raiders players to watch in Saturday's preseason game vs. Rams

LOS ANGELES -- The Raiders will face the Rams on Saturday in their second preseason game, and then again roughly three weeks later when it really counts.

Raiders coach Jon Gruden isn’t thrilled about it.

“I don’t understand it, honestly,” he said. “I really don’t.”

Exhibition No. 2 typically is an event where starters work deeper into the action, nearing closer to halftime. It’s a time to refine some and get in some good work.

That might not happen in the Silver and Black’s return to L.A. Coliseum. Even if action for the regulars increases over last week’s preseason game, coaches will provide a big scoop of vanilla ice cream.

“It’s a preseason game, and we have a lot of really tough evaluations to get through before we start thinking about what play we’re going to call,” Gruden said. “We’re going to really continue to use this as an evaluation, period. You’re going to see a lot of players playing a long period of time that are going to get a chance to show us they belong here. That’s how we’re looking at this game.”

We won’t see regulars for long, but two important debuts are in the cards. Another pair is looking to impress. Here are four players to watch against the Rams.

CB Gareon Conley

Conley was supposed to miss four weeks with a hip injury he suffered during training camp’s first full-squad practice. That might’ve cost him the entire preseason. Conley and the Raiders were thrilled he made it back in two weeks.

Conley expects to play Saturday for the first time in nearly a year, after missing the last 13 games in 2017 with a shin injury that required surgery. He might not stick around long, but he could support the praise heaped upon his potential, athleticism and ball skills.

Showing well this preseason would inspire confidence that he can become a top-flight cornerback.

Conley, for his part, isn’t stressing over another injury issue.

“If you think about it, it’s going to happen. You have to put it out of your mind,” Conley said. “If you don’t, it becomes more mental than physical. Once you think about it, you get hurt again. You can keep going down and down. You’ve got to stay (positive).”

DE Arden Key

The former LSU edge rusher missed last week’s preseason game with a bum ankle, but he's set to make his professional debut in L.A. He should get some solid snaps in this one, and many are anxious to see if he can translate excellent practice work into games.

He has a wide variety of pass-rush moves -- he’d be wise to keep some in the arsenal -- and tremendous agility working against offensive tackles. He’s long with unreal bend, and many within the organization are expecting him to make an immediate impact.

QB EJ Manuel

Connor Cook was the first quarterback off the bench in last week’s preseason game against Detroit, and the Michigan State alum took full advantage. A solid performance didn’t earn Cook the right to back up Derek Carr. Gruden insists that job remains competitive, and that Manuel would get more work against the Rams.

Manuel must capitalize on it to get back in a race he might be losing at this stage. He has worked mostly with the third team in recent practices, and has had an issue with fumbled snaps. Cook had an uneven week of practice, so the window’s still cracked for Manuel to earn the No. 2 job he had last year.

WR Griff Whalen

The Stanford product got more run than anyone expected against the Lions. The slot receiver played 14 snaps of offense with the first and second units, and had a chance to return punts and kickoffs. His work came before Ryan Switzer, who had been the primary slot guy in practice.

That order changed during this practice week, when Whalen continued to work with top units.

“Whalen has stepped up,” Gruden said. “He earned that right. He’s doing some great things.”

He has to keep doing them, because a roster spot is not guaranteed. He was believed to be on the outside looking in prior to the Lions game, and he must prove on offense and special teams in these preseason games to earn a job in a competitive position group.

Khalil Mack, Raiders still not close on contract two games into preseason

Khalil Mack, Raiders still not close on contract two games into preseason

Khalil Mack will not play in the Raiders' preseason game Saturday against the Rams as his contract holdout continues. 

The edge rusher missed all of the Raiders' training camp and will be a no-show for the team's second preseason game. Sources continue to tell Insider Scott Bair the sides are not close to an agreement, although Oakland does not plan on trading the 2016 NFL Defensive Player of the Year.

The Raiders can fine Mack a game check with every preseason game that he misses, as ESPN recently pointed out. That doesn't mean that they will do so, however. Typically, once team and player come to an agreement, those fines go away. 

The Raiders dealt with a similar situation during Donald Penn's holdout from training camp and preseason games last season. The offensive lineman did not report to the team until late August, but the Raiders never made Penn pay the accumulated fines.

It's clear Raiders head coach Jon Gruden wants Mack on the team for the 2018 season.

“It has obviously, for me, been disappointing,” Gruden said Wednesday. “You want to have your best player here. This guy is really a great guy, too. I’m disappointed we don’t have him here.

“We’re going to try to get him here as soon as we can. In the time being, you got to move on. You’ve got to get up and go to work. That’s one thing I’m very proud of what we’ve done here.”

Mack currently is under contract, set to make $13,846 million on a fifth-year team option of his rookie contract applicable only to first-round draft picks.