Raiders

NFL free agency grades: Raiders' huge moves, big names just the start

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NFL free agency grades: Raiders' huge moves, big names just the start

The Raiders made some huge moves over the last week. Coach Jon Gruden and general manager Mike Mayock were aggressive in pursuit of players in their prime who can help the team now and through the Raiders’ transition to Las Vegas. They didn’t drop a few bucks. They spent big, handing out four contracts averaging eight figures per season.

They aren’t done yet, with a few needs left to fill with veteran talent and a few of their own to re-sign before shifting focus to a 2019 NFL draft in which they have four picks in the top 35 overall.

Let’s take a look at what the Raiders have done so far during the NFL free agency period, including one big trade:

WR Antonio Brown

Trades are all about what you got versus what you gave up. Gruden and Mayock didn’t fork over much for a four-time All-Pro receiver considered high among the game’s elite. Just a third-rounder and a fifth-round pick, in fast. The Raiders paid Brown some pretty pennies -- $50.125 million over three years, with $30 million guaranteed -- to go along with the trade, but standard production will make him worth the expense. Some say adding a nearly 31-year-old won’t help the Raiders’ long-term rebuilding project, that he might not be dominant when the Silver and Black are deep enough to compete for titles.

He makes the 2019 Raiders a lot better, a welcome turn after playing 2018 without Khalil Mack, Amari Cooper or trade return for them. He also gives the Raiders star power they can put on a billboard in Oakland and Las Vegas, something important as they relocate.

Brown aced his introductory press conference, promising to lead and set a new standard for his position group and the entire team. If that happens, the Raiders get an A-plus here. If he gets frustrated by losing more than he’s used to and becomes a distraction, the Raiders aren’t getting a good return on investment. There’s a strong belief Brown will continue producing for years, which is the most important factor in any deal.

Grade: B-plus

OT Trent Brown

Brown signed a four-year, $66 million contract with $36.75 million guaranteed, the largest ever for an NFL offensive tackle. The deal was complete less than 10 minutes after the free-agency negotiating window opened. It was, as Brown put it, and offer he couldn’t refuse. Can’t blame him for that.

Drafting and developing such premium positions is more cost effective, but it’s a crapshoot even with solid player vetting. The Raiders like 2018 first-round pick Kolton Miller, but were concerned enough about third-rounder Brandon Parker to make a bold move for Trent Brown.

That’s a ton of money for someone who isn’t even locked in to play left tackle. He and 2018 first-round pick Kolton Miller will bookend the offensive line for years, and Brown will look to continue last year’s excellent play, good enough to produce a record-breaking contract. Brown’s a good player, really good in fact. But, again, that’s a lot of money. Tough to live up to that contract.

Grade: C-plus

DB Lamarcus Joyner

The Raiders desperately needed help at free safety and a slot cornerback. Joyner fills both needs. He’s adept playing both and will switch between the two positions as a three-down player. The Raiders could still use another defensive back for depth, but he gives experience and leadership to an otherwise young secondary. He should compliment Karl Joseph on the back end, and provide speed a stability deep the Raiders haven’t had in years.

While $42 million over four years is a lot, the $16.7 million guaranteed goes quickly. It’s gone after a 2020 roster bonus, so the Raiders can cut bait after two years without dead money if the deal doesn’t work out. That allows the Raiders to maintain flexibility as they move forward and find the proper mix to play better defense.

Joyner’s the only new defender signed thus far – defense should be the focus of the NFL draft -- a real swing and miss for a unit that needs veteran leadership. Joyner was a good get, however, and should be a strong addition to the secondary.

Grade: A-minus

WR Tyrell Williams

The Raiders upgraded their receiver corps not once but twice in a week, adding Brown and this 6-foot-4 deep threat to the pattern. Gruden has a goal, to form the NFL’s best receiver corps. That group was devoid of talent last year, and pairing Brown and Williams provides a significant upgrade to the passing game. Williams is a gamer, someone who can play every receiver position if required. He has averaged nearly 16 yards per reception and having someone who can make big plays should further add a dynamic quality receiver to the offense.

He didn’t come cheap -- Williams signed a $44 million contract with $22 million guaranteed -- especially for someone who will be a clear-cut No. 2 receiver. He will benefit from the attention paid to Brown, offering plenty of single-coverage that could lead to solid and steady production.

Gruden likes big, consistent, smart receivers. Williams checks every box and should be a productive member of the Raiders' offense. He’s another free-agent signing who can help stabilize an offense that dropped off the map too often. Some may shudder at his contract when compared to his stats, but he capitalized on a weak free-agent receiver class and was able to charge top dollar. The Raiders had to pay the going rate for a good receiver.

Grade: A-minus

DT Johnathan Hankins

The Raiders came away impressed with Hankins, who signed on early during the 2018 regular season and made a real impact on the defensive interior. He’s a steady run stopper with pass-rush ability in his past. He fits in well with what the Raiders like to do at nose tackle, an important post that allows others to make plays.

Hankins came at a decent rate, for $8.5 million and $5.25 million guaranteed over two seasons, with most of the payout coming next year when the Raiders are in Las Vegas. He’s an important, albeit unheralded part of a defensive line rotation. Even though he’s retention wasn’t considered a big move, it’s an important one as the Raiders build depth on defense.

Grade: B

S Erik Harris

Harris is a solid special teams player who last year proved able to impact games on defense. Good teams need guys like that, who can play every down in the kicking game and fill in specific roles or larger ones as a reserve without missing a beat.

The Raiders secured Harris for two seasons instead of letting him test restricted free agency this year or unrestricted free agency in 2020. He also saw safety depth in this free agent class and jumped at the opportunity for more security than a one-year tender.

If the Raiders don’t add a safety in the draft, Harris could fill in at free safety when Joyner moves into the slot. Gruden loves Harris and has no problem rewarding special teams leaders. He’ll play important roles this year.

Grade: A-minus

Why NBC Sports' Josh Norris has faith in Josh Jacobs, Raiders' O-line

Why NBC Sports' Josh Norris has faith in Josh Jacobs, Raiders' O-line

Following a bye week for the fantasy outlook is a lot like a box of chocolates ... you don't know what you're going to get.

Josh Jacobs and the Raiders head into Week 7 with a game against the Green Bay Packers. and the first-round draft pick's fantasy value will continue to rise according to NBC Sports analyst Josh Norris.

"Josh Jacobs right now is one -- the best player on the Oakland Raiders' offense, and two -- possibly a top-10 running back in the NFL by season's end," Norris told NBC Sports Bay Area. 

Norris wanted to also give credit to the Raiders' offensive line for how they performed against the Chicago Bears in the 24-21 win in Week 5. 

Despite the off week, Jacobs might continue to be a force to stay away from opposing teams. But if you're a Jacobs' owner, count your blessings.

Even against a tough Packers defense, his rookie campaign cannot be ignored.

[RELATED: Raiders-Packers odds, predictions, lines]

In the last outing for the running back, Jacobs ran for 123 yards with two touchdowns. That Packers D gives up 4.9 yards per carry and has allowed seven rushing touchdowns.

That's amazing news for owners. Start him if you weren't planning on it anyway.

Raiders-Packers odds, predictions: Betting lines, picks for NFL Week 7 game

Raiders-Packers odds, predictions: Betting lines, picks for NFL Week 7 game

The Raiders’ seemingly never-ending road trip continues as Oakland visits the Green Bay Packers for a Week 7 showdown.

Jon Gruden’s team won a physical Week 5 game over former Raiders edge rusher Khalil Mack and the Chicago Bears, 24-21, in London. 

Oakland will be without No. 1 receiver Tyrell Williams, who is dealing with plantar fasciitis. Davante Adams will also be out for Green Bay, leaving both Oakland and Green Bay without their top target.

[RELATED: Why Worley's versatility is key for Raiders vs. Packers]

Line:

Caesars: GB -4.5 (-110)
Consensus: GB -4.5 (-110)
Westgate: GB -4.5  (-110)
Wynn: GB -4.5 (-110)

Here’s how NFL writers around the country see the Raiders-Packers matchup shaking out:

Paul Gutierrez, ESPN: Packers 27, Raiders 21
Rob Demovsky, ESPN: Packers 28, Raiders 24
Gregg Rosenthal, NFL.com: Packers 31, Raiders 24
Michael David Smith, Pro Football Talk: Packers 21, Raiders 20
Mike Florio, Pro Football Talk: Raiders 24, Packers 23
Vinnie Iyer, Sporting News: Packers 23, Raiders 19