Raiders

San Francisco mayor doesn't want Raiders at Oracle Park next season

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USATSI

San Francisco mayor doesn't want Raiders at Oracle Park next season

The Raiders are in discussions with the San Francisco Giants about playing their 2019 NFL season at Oracle Park. The Silver and Black no longer have a lease to play at Oakland Coliseum, and took an extension proposal off the table after the city sued them and the NFL over what it claimed are antitrust violations and breach of contract.

That action has left the Raiders exploring all options for where to play in 2019, their final year before moving to Las Vegas. Playing next season at Oracle Park is a preferred option the team is exploring with the Giants.

The mayor of San Francisco, for one, doesn’t want that to happen.

London Breed discussed the matter during a Tuesday appearance on KTVU, and said she prefers the Raiders remain in Oakland next season.

“As far as I’m concerned, the Oakland Raiders should play in Oakland,” Breed said. “In San Francisco, we have a number of challenges that we need to address with the Warriors coming to the new Chase arena, the 1,400 housing units set to break ground in that area, our transportation system and our ferry landing, we have a number of things we have been working to prepare for, and we don’t need another layer to add to what we already have in terms of an area that’s really congested, filled with construction and will host a number of games for basketball and baseball over the coming months.”

Breed also said she expressed her opinions to the Giants, who own and operate Oracle Park.

Opposition from public officials is one hindrance, but there’s a bigger one also unresolved. The 49ers have territorial rights to the city of San Francisco. The team, which plays at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, and the NFL must approve the Raiders playing there. That has not happened to this point, and getting approval could prove a difficult proposition.

The Raiders also are evaluating less attractive Bay Area options, including Levi’s Stadium. Owner Mark Davis is said to dislike that venue, which was built to accommodate two NFL teams. It would seem the 49ers would prefer the Raiders play a season there, where extra revenue could be generated for the team and the city of Santa Clara.

[RELATED: Raiders playing at Oracle being explored by league]

The Raiders also have not eliminated the prospect of returning to the Coliseum, where they have played for most of their history.

Raiders, No. 4 overall pick Clelin Ferrell agree to four-year contract

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AP

Raiders, No. 4 overall pick Clelin Ferrell agree to four-year contract

The Raiders signed one of their three first-round draft picks Tuesday, and it’s the richest deal of them all.

No. 4 overall pick Clelin Ferrell inked a four-year contract slotted for $31.2 million, with a fifth-year team option standard to all first-round picks, the team announced Tuesday.

Every dime of these rookie deals is fully guaranteed, with a $20.8 million signing bonus.

The Raiders still must sign No. 24 overall pick Josh Jacobs and No. 27 selection Johnathan Abram, but there’s no real concern about a holdup in either case.

Rookie contracts don’t contain much wiggle room thanks to a wage scale that slots players into deals by draft spot.

Ferrell locked up his hefty sum after the Raiders took him higher than many expected. The Clemson edge rusher is an ideal scheme fit with high-level college production the Raiders believe will translate into a steady three-down NFL player capable of contributing right away.

“Clelin is exactly what I’m looking for,” Raiders defensive coordinator Paul Guenther said. "That’s the kind of guys we had (with the Bengals). The Michael Johnson and the Carlos Dunlaps we had in Cincinnati that are every-down ends, that are big men that can both rush and play the run. So he’s exactly what we’re looking for.”

[RELATED: AB setting new standard for all Raiders during offseason]

The Raiders' offseason program ended last week, but rookies can stick around another week to work with strength and conditioning staff and the player engagement department.

Raiders Daniel Carlson wants to build on Raiders success, not replicate it

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USATSI

Raiders Daniel Carlson wants to build on Raiders success, not replicate it

The Minnesota Vikings took the first kicker in last year’s NFL draft, but that didn’t stop them from cutting Daniel Carlson at the first sign of trouble. The Auburn alum was off the roster following a rough go against Green Bay, suddenly on the street despite great power, accuracy and pedigree.

That transaction raised Rich Bisaccia’s eyebrow. The Raiders special teams coach considered a top talent, someone who could solve his in-season kicker issues with Giorgio Tavecchio cut in camp and Eddy Piñeiro and Mike Nugent on injured reserve. Bisaccia had an in with Carlson after helping recruit him to Auburn. That, the Raiders thought, would separate them from the competition when bringing him in for a workout.

Carlson still said no.

This wasn’t about the Raiders. He declined offers from everybody, as a matter of fact, choosing to work out kinks away from massive crowds and quick-to-judge head coaches with nothing invested in him.

“My agent and I obviously talked about it a good bit,” Carlson said. “We just felt like at that time I could take a break, work on some things that I wanted to work on. Once you get into the season, you’re just getting ready for Sunday. You’re getting ready for Sunday, so it was nice to be able to step back, be able to work on a couple little things and then be able to… I knew an opportunity would come. Obviously, I didn’t know where from, but I just wanted to make sure when that came I was ready and would be ready for the rest of the season.”

He made some tweaks and was eventually able to double back to the Raiders when he was ready. Patience proved a virtue for player and team.

Carlson was awesome after joining the Raiders, with a franchise-record 94.1-percent conversion rate. He hit 16 of 17 field goals in silver and black, including a game-winner as time expired on one of their four wins.

Carlson wants to match that effort in 2019 and for years to come as the Raiders kicker. He won’t compete for a gig this season but is still pushing for improvement and consistency through near-constant self-evaluation even now, when sailing on the calm.

“I think he’s working on getting a master’s in himself,” Bisaccia said. “I think he knows faster than anybody else what’s good about what he does and when it’s not the hit that he’s expecting to make. I think he can self-correct quickly and just our professional opinions we thought he was really a good player coming out. He was certainly a draft-able kicker and then when he became available we couldn’t get him for the first workout, he wanted to go work on a few things on his own and when he was ready for a workout we got him in. He did a tremendous job and now he’s ours.”

Carlson doesn’t subscribe to the ain’t-broke-down-fix-it model. He wants to build on last season’s success over simply replicating it. That more than anything else remains his drive heading toward the 2019 season.

“I wouldn’t say you ever maintain,” Carlson said. “I think you’re always getting worse or better. I think yes, I learned some things that worked last year and I want to keep those things going. But at the same time, I always want to improve. I’ve been working really hard this offseason. Obviously, I took a little break after the season ended and kind of got back to it. I want to continue to build off of what I had last year and the things that were going well. Still continuing to improve every day. I think for the most part I’ve been able to do that.”

Carlson’s able to get nit-picky these days, even looking at attempts that earned three points. He grades each one, and despite the pass-fail nature of his profession, he doesn’t view it as a zero-sum game. He also understands every kick won’t be perfect but needs even the subpar efforts to fly straight and true.

[RELATED: Simms ranked as Chris Simms' No. 18 overall QB]

Carlson is always working on an ironclad mental approach and consistent form that can be more challenging for someone standing 6-foot-5.

“Being taller you have to be very, very exact,” Carlson said. “Continuing to be able to do that nine out of 10 times, but now hopefully I’m going to be able to do it 99 out of 100 times. Just trying to get better each and every day.”