Raiders

Why Raiders should trade for Jalen Ramsey, who wants to play in Las Vegas

Why Raiders should trade for Jalen Ramsey, who wants to play in Las Vegas

Let's get the obvious out of the way: Jalen Ramsey is the best cornerback in the NFL. Full stop.

The 24-year-old has shown he has the talent to go up against the best receivers in the game and come out on top. He has been a key component of a Jaguars' defense that has been one of the best in the NFL over the past two seasons.

And now he reportedly has requested a trade, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter.

Friction between Ramsey and the Jags has been brewing for quite some time, and it appeared to boil over Sunday when he got into a sideline argument with head coach Doug Marrone.

Now, there's no telling whether or not Ramsey will get his way, but he's already told us where he would want to play if given the choice: the Raiders or the Titans. 

Ramsey is from Nashville, so playing in front of his hometown team would make sense, but would the Raiders be interested? Better yet, should they be?

Short answer: Yes and yes.

Following the Antonio Brown saga that ended with the Raiders releasing the receiver before he ever played a snap in Oakland, head coach Jon Gruden might want to avoid players prone to drama. Make no mistake, Ramsey, while brash and confident, is not Antonio Brown, and to suggest so because he has requested a trade is irresponsible. Now, that isn't to say Ramsey is without headache, and it's fair to wonder if general manager Mike Mayock and Gruden would want to go down that road again. Would Gruden even want to handle the quote-unquote volatile superstar, which Ramsey has, either fairly or unfairly, been labeled?

But the bottom line is simple: Talent talks.

Gruden should see an opportunity to collect talent and take his secondary from mediocre at best to almost elite. The easiest way to accelerate a rebuild is to acquire top-tier talent.

The Raiders already boast talented young corners Gareon Conley and Trayvon Mullen, along with veteran slot cornerback Lamarcus Joyner. Cornerback Daryl Worley will be a free agent after this season, and Conley still is on his rookie contract, which could go through 2021 if the Raiders exercise his fifth-year option.

Acquiring Ramsey would allow the Raiders to move Conely to the No. 2 corner position and give Mullen time to become the star his talent suggests he is. Once the Clemson product is fully actualized, the Raiders could have one of the most elite secondaries in recent memory. The Raiders did use two high draft picks on Mullen and Conley, and they might not want to relegate Mullen to the No. 3 corner for the near future, but it's a problem only teams stocked with talent have to worry about. It's a good problem to have.

Now, there's the issue of what it would take to acquire Ramsey and the cost to keep him in silver and black once his contract is up. The Jaguars reportedly are looking for a first-round draft pick. The Raiders have two in next year's draft thanks to the Khalil Mack trade, and swapping the lower of the two would be well worth the cost of acquiring a 24-year-old All-Pro cornerback.

Once Ramsey's contract is up, he's made it clear he won't take a discount. He wants to get paid. As he should. By virtue of voiding Brown's guaranteed money and ejecting him to Foxboro, the Raiders saved $30 million and have the capital to make Ramsey a Raider long term. It seems like a perfect match.

Maybe you aren't sold on Ramsey or you think the price is too high. So, let's look at the numbers.

The Chiefs are the team the Raiders are trying to catch in the AFC West, and as seen Sunday in KC's 28-10 win, they have a ways to go. The Chiefs also didn't have elite speedster Tyreek Hill and still torched the Raiders. If the Raiders are going to be seeing Hill two times a year for the foreseeable future, they should want to acquire a guy who has been able to bottle up the Chiefs' dynamic weapon. 

During last season's Jags-Chiefs game, Hill went up against Ramsey on 18 snaps. Of those 18 snaps, Hill was targeted just five times and caught two balls for 47 yards. When the two matched up in Week 1 this season, Hill caught two passes for 16 yards against Ramsey before leaving with an injury. 

Ramsey currently faces Houston Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins two times a season and it's been a battle since Ramsey came into the league. Coming into Sunday's matchup. Hopkins had caught 18 passes on 32 targets in his career against Ramsey, averaging 8.6 yards per target and scoring twice since 2017. But Sunday, Ramsey allowed Hopkins to tally just 27 yards on seven targets in the Texans' 14-13 win.

Ramsey also has battled Brown, now with the Patriots, during his career. When facing the dynamic receiver, Ramsey has allowed him to catch nine passes on 13 targets for 155 yards. But he hasn't allowed a touchdown and has picked off two passes intended for Brown. Elite receivers are going to get their Ws, but Ramsey has played the best of the best tougher than anyone.

The AFC is full of talented receivers, and while Conley is good, Ramsey is the best cover guy in the NFL bar none and he's still just 24.

[RELATED: Mullen will learn from NFL debut vs. Broncos]

Mayock and Gruden made it their mission in the offseason to get younger, faster and more talented. Ramsey checks all those boxes and he gives you an elite player at one of the most important positions in football.

If the Jags ask for the Bears' first-round draft pick, Gruden should fly the rights to the selection to Jacksonville himself and bring Ramsey back with him.

Draft picks are exciting because they are based in the unknown. In what they could turn in to.

We know what Ramsey is: The best at his position. And he wants to play in Las Vegas.

Case closed.

Mark Davis, John Madden, others remember Raiders legend Willie Brown

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AP

Mark Davis, John Madden, others remember Raiders legend Willie Brown

Willie Brown was beloved inside the Raiders organization, and out. The Hall of Fame cornerback and Silver and Black mainstay made a positive impression on most everyone, no matter how long they were with the franchise.

That has been clear on social media, with condolences and memories told from so many who met him after news broke Tuesday that Brown had died at 78 years old.

Raiders owner Mark Davis knew Brown as well as anyone. He was close with the entire Davis family, including late owner Al Davis and Mark’s mother Carol. That’s a main reason why Brown’s death hit Mark Davis hard.

“It’s a very sad day for the Raider Nation as a whole, and for my family in particular,” Davis said in a statement. "Willie Brown was one of the greatest to ever play the game. But it was off the field, and how he treated my mom for which I will forever be indebted to him.

"Every road trip, it was Willie who helped my mom up and down the stairs of the plane. It was Willie who joined her for all dinners on the road. It was Willie who came to her every birthday and Mother’s Day dinner. It was Willie who was her best friend. We loved and will miss you, Willie.”

Former Raiders head coach John Madden also expressed his sorrow for Brown’s loss.

“Willie Brown was a true Raider and one of the best cornerbacks that ever played the game,” Madden said in a statement. “It was a comfort to a coach to be able to have Willie Brown in the defensive backfield. Willie was a good guy, a team captain, and a true Raider from the day he joined our team in 1967, until he passed away today.

"He will be missed by me and the entire Raiders organization.”

Those not old enough to remember Brown’s playing days or his work as a coach certainly know about his tradition of wishing an early “Happy Mother’s Day,” before announcing the team’s second-round pick. He read Derek Carr’s name back in 2014, a moment the quarterback never will forget.

Even NFL commissioner Roger Goodell issued a statement about Brown’s passing, remembering the dominant player and the Raiders ambassador.

"We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Raiders' great Willie Brown,” Goodell’s statement read. “As a player, coach, and executive, Willie served as a tremendous ambassador for the Raiders and football for more than 50 years. He will forever be immortalized by NFL Films with his iconic 75-yard interception return in Super Bowl XI as he ran straight into the camera and our imaginations.

"After a remarkable 16-year Pro Football Hall of Fame career that he began as an undrafted free agent, Willie went on to become a Raiders coach and later a member of the team's front office. Willie lived the Raiders' motto "Commitment to Excellence" with integrity and touched the lives of hundreds of NFL players with his wisdom and wit. Willie was always a welcome guest at the NFL Draft and I enjoyed visiting with him each year. He was always enthusiastic and optimistic about the Raiders' picks and upcoming season.

"We extend our condolences to Willie's family, the Raiders organization, and fans around the world."

NFL trade deadline: Pros, cons on players Raiders could try to acquire

NFL trade deadline: Pros, cons on players Raiders could try to acquire

The Raiders have made several huge trades during the Jon Gruden era. The latest came Monday, shipping former first-round draft pick Gareon Conley to Houston for a third-round pick.

A full week remains before the Oct. 29 NFL trade deadline, leaving plenty of time to make more moves to either acquire talent or draft capital vital to this roster rebuild.

The Raiders are in an interesting spot at 3-3, currently the AFC’s No. 7 seed, sitting just outside the playoff picture. They’re a half-game behind Houston for a coveted postseason spot and play the Texans on Sunday in a pivotal conference matchup nearing the season’s halfway point.

The Raiders will be active discussing trade possibilities over the next week and are expected to be buyers, armed with two first-round picks and three third-rounders. They can go after most anyone they want, though the capital is vital to the long-term plan of building a young foundation through the NFL draft.

It’s hard to see the Raiders shipping a first-round pick, but those third-round selections could come in handy this week. That could mean they essentially trade Conley from a position of strength -- they’re deep and young at cornerback -- and use one of the third-rounders to fortify a position of weakness without hindering them much on draft day.

It’s hard to predict what Gruden will do, except this: He’s not afraid to be bold. Whether the deal works out is another matter, but he could try to accelerate the team’s progress with a big move in trade.

Here are a few targets the Raiders should consider, that could help rush the passer, add linebacker depth or even contribute to a receiver corps being revamped as this season goes along, with pros and cons of adding a particular player.

DL Michael Bennett, New England Patriots

Pros: Bennett doesn’t seem thrilled with his role in New England and was suspended against the Jets after an argument with his position coach. He’s well into his 30s but has always gotten to the quarterback and would have a huge presence along the Raiders defensive front. He would naturally fit a four-man front and help against the run and pass.

Given his perceived dissatisfaction in New England and willingness to speak his mind, the price might not be excessive to land someone so talented. He’s older, but can still play at a high level.

Cons: He’s set to make $7 million in his age 34 season, but his 2020 employment is based on a team option, per overthecap.com. While an increased role in Oakland is a lock, continued winning is not. Might he be upset getting shipped from a Super Bowl favorite to a team that could fall out of the playoff picture?

DE Carlos Dunlap, Cincinnati Bengals

Pros: Dunlap worked with Raiders defensive coordinator Paul Guenther for years and should be able to step right in and contribute due to his scheme knowledge. He’s a massive player at 6-foot-6 and 280 pounds. He only had one sack this season but has been getting pressure and is a guy who has at least eight sacks for six straight seasons. He’s going to produce.

He’s 30 now, and should still have some good years left. Dunlap could also mentor a fleet of young Raiders pass rushers while anchoring one end. He’s also under contract and could be an expensive, yet controllable asset they could move on from if thing don’t work out long term.

Cons: This is a big one. Dunlap hasn’t played since Week 5 due to a knee injury but has been shockingly durable throughout his career. He also doesn’t come cheap, with hefty base salaries of $7.8 million in 2020 and $10.1 million in 2021. They can afford those sums or get out from under them if he doesn’t work out long term.

Edge rusher Ryan Kerrigan, Washington

Pros: The Raiders need production up front, and Kerrigan could certainly provide that. He has never had less than nine sacks in his career and has 97 over eight-plus seasons. He isn’t cheap but is coming up on the end of his deal, with Washington unlikely to be competitive before it expires.

The Raiders could add a leader and regular producer up front to anchor the line and take pressure off younger players to make an instant impact. He’s owed $11.5 million in base salary next season but the number isn’t guaranteed. The Raiders could rent, or lock in his 2020 salary and keep him around to start their Las Vegas run.

Cons: Kerrigan has logged a lot of miles already, hovering around 850 snaps a season since his rookie year. He also isn’t a perfect scheme fit, generally known as a 3-4 outside linebacker. He is 249 pounds and could rush off the edge in a more tradition 4-3 Raiders front. He also only has three sacks thus far, but production could increase by getting off a bad team.

Another hitch: Washington might make a Kerrigan trade cost prohibitive considering how well liked this long-tenured edge rusher is. It takes two to tango. Will Washington dance?

LB Preston Brown, Cincinnati Bengals

Pros: Brown seems to have fallen out of favor in Cincinnati and could be available for cheap. That’s because he has struggled this season, so he should be available for cheap. The Raiders don’t necessarily need a starting linebacker, with Tahir Whitehead and Nicholas Morrow playing most every snap.

They are woefully thin at that spot, however, and Brown could learn the scheme while providing depth and injury protection at an important spot. It might cost a draft pick way down the board, which might make this depth acquisition a possibility.

Cons: Will this move change the Raiders fortunes? Probably not, unless Morrow or Whitehead get hurt. One could argue for saving the draft pick over making the trade, but the Raiders are so thin there. It depends on how much confidence they have in Justin Phillips to play significant snaps if a player goes down.

WR A.J. Green, Cincinnati Bengals

Pros: When healthy, he’s a true No. 1 receiver who must be respected and feared. That’s something the Raiders don’t have and is the missing link for a truly dominant offense. Green would also set the receiver corps right, with Tyrell Williams as a No. 2 and solid options in Zay Jones and Trevor Davis after that.

If he can get healthy soon after a bad ankle injury, he could help the Raiders down the stretch and become a free agent at season’s end.

Cons: There are a few problems with this move. Green won’t be cheap despite possibly being a rental. He also isn’t expected to return until after the trade deadline, so there’s no sure thing he gets back to 100 percent this season.

[RELATED: Why Conley trade might not be Raiders' last before deadline]

Also, how many receivers should the Raiders trade for? They’ve acquired three since March. And don’t forget that this NFL draft class is loaded with quality receivers.

They’re better off standing pat at the position and grabbing an excellent, controllable prospect this spring.