Ray Ratto

Impasse broken -- labor talks see light

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Impasse broken -- labor talks see light

And so the circle of life continues on spinning round and round in the same place, and getting most of us nowhere.

The NBA is only the latest example of this, with a German opera of a negotiating session that ended after midnight and left both sides within sight of each other at the midpoint they were destined to arrive at anyway.

And they did it in the time-honored way hardline for a time, then moderate late.

You see, the details here dont matter all that much, because by the time this CBA is about the expire, the owners will scream it was a bad system that cannot endure. Thus, it will continue the streak of deals the owners hate as soon as they have figured out the last way to get around their own deal, and demand that the players agree to a new one that makes the owners even less responsible for their behavior.

And the cycle will begin again. The owners who dont really like basketball that much anyway, and really hate owning businesses in which the workers must be paid, will shriek that enough is enough, and theyd rather shut the game down than go in this vein any longer.

We, of course, will panic, because we do care about the game, dont know many of the owners, but know that if theyre like the guys we work for, theyll do it.

(Except of course the people I work for. They are human exemplars down to the last human).

And the hardliners will carry the day for awhile, convincing the union that this time they mean business. The union, who knows the game too well from having seen it so many times before, then has to make sure their players dont get scared and bolt from the hall.

Then the ugly negotiations start, with the hardliners at the table doing the talking and demeaning the union and players as much as they can get away with. And they know how much they can get away with when the union says, Fine, shut the doors. We hate you more than we like the job now, anyway. Go kill yourselves.

And at that point, the commissioner, who only earns his money at times like this, sees the hardliners have hit the wall and can only do damage now, comes in, rallies the moderates and says, Its our turn. The pre-Industrial Revolution nutjobs have done as much as they can do.

At that point, a miracle happens, as it did Wednesday night. The two sides know its time to stop screwing around and get a deal done.

Nobody ever knows when this point is reached, though the usual tipoff is like this one -- when you hear Derek Fisher call someone from management a liar. When the most rational guy in the room has had a bellyful of condescension, contempt and disgust from the other sides most demeaning members, the flares go off and everyone says, Well, were at that point. Give it three days, call for sandwiches and sodas and order notebooks and Number-2 pencils.

The notebooks and pencils are for doodling, by the way. Fifteen hours doing anything is tedious slogging.

So here we are again. Close to a deal, so close that it cant be undone unless one of the hardliners breaks out of his pen, bolts into the room and starts screaming about the benefits of serfdom, being chained to a table and making tennis shoes for four cents a day and how it builds more character than the union will ever know.

Right now, in short, weve passed the cat-herding stage and are down to the actual useful speaking. A deal will be reached soon, and then we can all go back to what we know best.

Waiting to see if the Warriors get to 32 wins before they get to 51 losses.

Ray Ratto is a columnist for CSNBayArea.com

For NFL owners, there's tons of cash in self-embarrassment

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AP

For NFL owners, there's tons of cash in self-embarrassment

The National Football League’s monumental inability to do anything but make money for its 32 owners has been discussed for, well, years, and as a shark-jumping exercise, it has finally reached landfall.  

Thus, the Miami Dolphins’ decision to first issue a nine-page discipline doctrine to its players that included a four-game suspension for protesting social issues during the National Anthem, and then walk it back within hours of the predictable outrage reminded us again of that first paragraph:  

That the NFL is only succeeding despite itself because America isn’t yet ready to abandon its football habit.  

But that’s not today epistle. The real question here is what the league’s owners perceive as the benefit they derive from never getting this right – as to give it its proper name, always looking foolish whatever side of the social protest discussion they hold at any point.  

There must be an up-side for the owners here because they are either smart people or have hired smart people, and they have met incessantly about this issue. There must be some profit in looking like dithering cowards and cowardly ditherers all at the same time.  

I’m just damned if I know how they’re doing it.  

The 32 owners, from Mark Davis and Jed York to Jerry Jones and Bob Kraft, are magnificent at making money where none could be found. It’s how billionaires become multibillionaires – having a seventh sense that allows them to divine massive piles of cash where everyone else finds sand.    

So there must be cash in self-embarrassment, and if there is, these 32 folks are the best ever at rooting it out and seizing it.  

Typically this level of persistent failure is accompanied by loss of money, and in some cases the end of the business itself. Football, though, is still in its too-big-to-fail stage, so there is no chance of imminent collapse.  

But dealing with issues this poorly for this long seems to come without punishment other than ridicule, and ridicule is still free. The owners must see some financial advantage in not only refusing to deal with something this simple, but dealing with it by deliberately misunderstanding the nature of social protest, allowing politicians to hijack the topic, punishing players while allegedly supporting them, and ultimately looking like that rarest of nature’s beasts, the cynical spineless bully.  

There’s cash in this stance somewhere, and it is up to a bold forensic accountant to figure out how they do it. My guess is, some yammering owner (my money’s on Jones, because he can’t shut up on any subject) will blow the whole gaff. Owners who used to be religious in their devotion to omerta, the Mafia’s vow of silence, now leak and preen and brag and strut their stuff as though they were the athletes they pay, and Jones is usually the worst at it.  

So I guess we’ll just have to wait until he cozies up to one of his favorite medioids and spills the story of how this seeming failure was actually a success, and how the owners knew what we mere humans could never comprehend:  

That there is money in seeming eternally dumbfounded by something so simple, and wearing that persistent bafflement like a highway worker’s vest and a light-up fez.

They do that, and we will take a knee in honor of their brilliance. Until then, we’ll just continue to assume their bumbling fecklessness is purely accidental.

 

Raiders' exit feels much more imminent after reported broadcaster swap

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AP

Raiders' exit feels much more imminent after reported broadcaster swap

If Mark Davis really has decided to end Greg Papa’s tenure as the radio voice of the Oakland Raiders, then one of the last links between Oakland and the Raiders now is broken.
 
Rumors have spun for the better part of a month that Davis was looking to plant another flag in Las Vegas soil, and within the past few days, veteran network broadcaster Brent Musburger’s name has been linked to the job. Musburger is the main voice at gambling radio station VSiN and lives in Las Vegas, and as such is as recognizable a voice for the town as there is. The news of Musberger's hire by the Raiders was reported by the Las Vegas Review-Journal late Tuesday.
 
The news picked up speed earlier Tuesday, first when tweeted out by “FakeRudyMartzke,” a largely credible voice on broadcasting gossip, and then picked up by AwfulAnnouncing.com and The Athletic. 
 
This would just be another inside-broadcasting story, though, if not for the fact that Papa, who's also a host for NBC Sports Bay Area, represents the second incarnation of the Oakland Raiders as Bill King represented the first, and breaking with that two years before the team’s actual departure from the Bay is another stark reminder of that departure.
 
The Raiders have not yet faced a real fan backlash over the decision to leave for Las Vegas, in large part because the process has gone so slowly and involved so many other cities. People have not only had a chance to face the fact that their team is leaving again, but the departure is not yet imminent.
 
Imminent arrives soon enough, though, and with it all the substantive and peripheral changes that will make the Raiders Nevada’s team. That Davis’ decision involves one of his father Al’s most trusted confidants also makes this another break with the old days, thus reinforcing Mark’s control of how the Raiders present themselves to the outside world.
 
The details on why Musburger has signed on for 2018 rather than 2020, when the Raiders are scheduled to relocate, still are to be ferreted out, but a team’s broadcaster, especially one with Papa’s tenure (21 years), is among the most enduring links between that team and its fan base, and change is jarring, especially as a harbinger of even bigger changes.
 
It is a change, though, that Davis is willing to undertake pre-emptively, either out of eagerness to begin the Las Vegas portion of his ownership or some professional/personal dissatisfaction with Papa. It breaks one of the last enduring bonds of this quarter-century of Oakland Raiders football, and with the minimal likelihood that there will ever be a third, this decision borders on the epochal.
 
In other words, Mark Davis now is making the Raiders' departure that much more real, and he's apparently ready to begin facing the belated reaction of a city scorned.