Ray Ratto

Where does Golden State's Game 4 clincher rank among Warriors-Cavs Finals matchups?

Where does Golden State's Game 4 clincher rank among Warriors-Cavs Finals matchups?

Warriors-Cavaliers is almost certainly a closed book now, an episodic drama that has finally reached end-of-show status. There is nothing left to tell, no secrets left to unearth. The braids have been undone, and this part of NBA history is now, well, history.

That is, unless LeBron James either falls back in love with owner Dan Gilbert or can be convinced (or convince himself) that the job he is going to is worse than the job he wants to leave.

With that as the apocalyptic backdrop, we now present The All-22 View, the list of the 22 Finals games between these two teams in rough order of impact.

SERIES ONE, GAME SIX, WARRIORS, 105-97

The Warriors’ first clincher in 40 years, a changing of the guard led by Stephen Curry’s 25, Andre Iguodala’s 25 and Draymond Green’s first triple-double. Also LeBron James’ final concession to the weariness of overuse (35-of-89 in the final three games, 6-of-22 from three on an average of 44 minutes per game).

SERIES ONE, GAME FOUR: WARRIORS, 103-82

The game in which Iguodala was inserted into the starting lineup to clamp down on James, break Cleveland’s momentum, and he did it so well (see above) that he won Finals MVP and became a national name and jump-started the Warrior Decade.

SERIES TWO, GAME FOUR: WARRIORS, 108-97

James baited Green into the suspension avoided in the Western Conference Finals when his foot took over his brain and found Stephen Adams’ goolies. It helped reverse a series clearly in Golden State’s favor and made “Blown 3-1 Lead” a meme.

SERIES TWO, GAME SEVEN: CAVALIDERS, 93-89

The Cavaliers break up the Warrior dynasty before it starts because Kyrie Irving hits the only shot by either team in the last 4:48, and because both Curry and Klay Thompson shoot dreadfully throughout the game. This provides the Warriors daily motivation for the Hamptons vacation that changed basketball.

SERIES FOUR, GAME FOUR: WARRIORS, 108-85

The most ruthless game against a good team the Warriors have ever played. Curry went for 37, Durant had a triple-double, JaVale McGee was glorious, but most of all they finished LeBron James’ time in Cleveland with the most comprehensive beating in all areas. It was an unfair fight from the anthem on.

SERIES THREE, GAME FIVE: WARRIORS, 129-120

The second clinch, and the night Kevin Durant outgunned James and cemented the idea in the old and narrow-minded that free agency comes with an asterisk that punishes players for entering into a contract with someone who wants them. James has the best numbers (41/13/8) but the Warriors have the most best numbers (Durant 39/6/5, Curry 34/6/10, Green 10/12/5, Iguodala 20/4/3).

SERIES TWO, GAME FIVE: CAVALIERS, 112-97

The Green suspension, when added to the injury to Andrew Bogut that left the Warriors too small and insufficiently bulky to prevent a 15-point Cleveland win in Oakland, and worse to come.

SERIES ONE, GAME TWO: CAVALIERS, 95-93

Curry’s worst night in any Finals (5-for-23, 2-for-15 from three), while James evened the series with a 39/16/11 triple-double in a 95-93 win.

SERIES FOUR, GAME ONE: WARRIORS, 124-114

J.R. Smith overcame James’ 51-point night with the kind of thing J.R. Smith makes famous, and the overtime rout by Goplden State guaranteed the first series of the modern era to be clinched in Game 1.

SERIES FOUR, GAME THREE: WARRIORS, 110-92

Durant’s 43 points and unadulterated brashness provide more than sufficient cover for brutal shooting nights from Curry and Thompson, and becomes the sure-thing MVP...until Game 4, when he still ended up MVP, but by a narrower margin.

SERIES THREE, GAME FOUR: CAVALIERS, 137-116

The Warriors lose their chance to out-Moses Malone and go fo’-fo’-fo’-fo’. In fairness, Irving’s 40 and James’ 31 had something to do with it, too.

SERIES ONE, GAME ONE: WARRIORS, 108-100

James had 41, but the Warriors showed the moment was not too big for them. A confidence-booster for a first-timer that allowed them to overcome Cleveland’s next two wins despite the loss of Kyrie Irving.

SERIES THREE, GAME ONE: WARRIORS, 113-91

Durant put down an initial deposit on the best years of his career by going 38/9/8 in a lopsided opener.

SERIES FOUR, GAME TWO: WARRIORS, 122-103

Hot off the mess that was Game 1, Curry broke the playoff record for threes, including five in the fourth, showing a fresh glimpse of why he is James’ truest rival for the nation’s heart attention.

SERIES TWO, GAME SIX: CAVALIERS, 115-101

James had 41 despite the return of Green, and forced the Warriors to contemplate their mortality in a series they surely had mentally celebrated.

SERIES THREE, GAME TWO: WARRIORS, 132-113

James doesn’t even play 40 minutes (one of three times that occurred in these games) as Durant had the second of his five consecutive 30-point games.

SERIES ONE, GAME FIVE: WARRIORS, 104-91

Curry’s 37 turns the series back in Golden State’s favor enough that nobody expects Cleveland to rally, and it didn’t. James’ 40 was marked by exhaustion as the toll of having no Irving finally weighed him down for good.

SERIES THREE, GAME THREE: WARRIORS, 118-113

The closest game of the series, won only because Durant (31/9/4) was joined by Thompson’s 30 and Curry’s 26 to trump James and Irving combining for 77.

SERIES ONE, GAME THREE: CAVALIERS, 96-91

James goes for 40, 12 and 8 without Irving, but the spectre of the Iggy Colossus awaits.

SERIES TWO, GAME THREE: CAVALIERS, 120-90

Cleveland responds to losses in the first two games by smashing the Warriors by the widest margin in the rivalry. Seems innocuous now, but at the time it gave the Cavs a life they seized upon later in the series.

SERIES TWO, GAME TWO: WARRIORS, 110-77

The least explicable game of the 22, because of what came afterward. It may have lulled the Warriors into a false sense of superiority, but they were young, and had much to learn, mostly at the back of LeBron’s hand.

SERIES TWO, GAME ONE: WARRIORS, 104-89

Given what happened next in the series and in the rivalry, the least memorable of all. I mean, a 15-point Warrior win seemed so normal at this point. Little did we know.

Game Result/Schedule
Game 1 Warriors 124, Cavs 114 (OT)
Game 2 Warriors 122, Cavs 103
Game 3 Warriors 110, Cavs 102
Game 4 Warriors 108, Cavs 85

49ers learn a lesson after letting big lead slip in win over Lions

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AP

49ers learn a lesson after letting big lead slip in win over Lions

The 49ers now are 1-1, but to keep you hooked for next week, we can report that nothing of substance was revealed Sunday.
 
At least nothing that would make you have firm beliefs about who and what they are, what they have and what they lack.
 
In escaping the Detroit Lions, 30-27, the 49ers largely showed that they have the capability to dominate an inferior team but are not assured enough to finish them. Or, to quote Richard Sherman, which always is a good place to go, they need to learn “not to take a sigh when you’re up, 30-13.” In other words, to allow 182 yards and two scores once you take said lead, which is more a matter of player attention than scheme flaws.
 
They learned that teams still believe in Sherman enough to avoid throwing his way, and that means they will throw at Ahkello Witherspoon on the other side of the field until he makes them do otherwise.
 
They learned that Jimmy Garoppolo still holds the ball longer than safety would permit, and either he needs to be more decisive or his wide receivers need to be more forceful in separation.
 
(Cue Josh Gordon hysteria in 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... )
 
They learned that Pierre Garcon will block all the way to the parking lot, as he did on Matt Breida’s 66-yard touchdown run, and that Garoppolo will make a tackle when the need is acute, as it was on Tracy Walker’s apparent game-winning interception -- “just a flashback to my linebacking days, I guess,” the QB said, minimizing the monumental error he helped commit to make that tackle momentarily necessary.
 
But mostly, they found out that they have miles to go before they can feel confident about their institutional knowledge about putting games away, because they did allow the Lions, who had been routed by the New York Jets a week ago, to scare them within an off-the-ball holding call that negated Walker’s interception and saved the 49ers' defense from having to make a desperate stand.
 
How desperate? A number of 49ers referred to it as a pick-six, which it wasn’t, no matter how it might have felt.
 
“A win’s a win,” coach Kyle Shanahan said with the precision of a Football Outsiders staffer, “but I’m extra frustrated that we couldn’t finish ‘em off. We have to learn to put those games away.”
 
The problem, of course, is that the 49ers are not yet at that stage of their development and are just seven games from being one of the most forlorn teams in the National Football League. Like everyone else, they would seem to be prone to recency bias – in this case, thinking the Lions were ready to Vontae Davis the rest of their season based on seven quarters of uninspiring football.
 
More to the point, it is hard to gauge them off a decisive loss to a superior team and a narrow win over an inferior one. As one of the many teams stuck in the amorphous middle of the league, the 49ers will be prone to the performance swings between weeks and within games.
 
Shanahan, for example, made a point of saying how much better he felt about his team’s red-zone performance in Week 1 at Minnesota than he did Sunday, even though they scored twice. Three sacks of Garoppolo and just 8 yards gained in 20 plays inspired that analysis.
 
Shanahan also answered the Gordon issue by saying how much loves the players he has but always is looking to improve the roster, a noncommittal answer to a question inspired only by the receiver’s reportedly stated interest in coming. The 49ers presumably would be more efficient and effervescent offensively when Marquise Goodwin returns from his thigh bruise, but that, like Gordon’s desirability, remains only speculative.
 
This is about the known, and the known is pretty minimal. The 49ers are exactly what we all expected them to be after two weeks -- a work in progress and in regress. Their next two games against dynamic offenses in Kansas City (oh God) and Los Angeles (the Chargers can score, but they remain goofy), and then they return to face the wholly inert Cardinals before drawing the Packers at Lambeau and the Rams in L.A.
 
In other words, this will get harder before it gets easier. But a win’s a win, and it’s better that they try to keep the short view for now. There are plenty of people available to take the long view for them.

Where Erik Karlsson trade ranks in greatest Bay Area sports acquisitions

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USATSI/AP

Where Erik Karlsson trade ranks in greatest Bay Area sports acquisitions

The Erik Karlsson trade is very clearly the second-biggest deal in San Jose Sharks history, and that only because nothing is going to beat the Joe Thornton trade almost 13 years ago.
 
That turned out to be a massive swindle for the Sharks, fueled in part by Boston’s zeal to solve its Thornton problem (he didn’t win six Stanley Cups in his five seasons as a Bruin). The Karlsson deal seems to resemble that deal in that Ottawa wanted Karlsson gone as part of its ritual franchise-gutting, and Doug Wilson had already removed their issues with Mike Hoffman earlier in the season.
 
But for non-hockey fans, this still ranks among the biggest acquisitions in Bay Area history regardless of sport – if and only if he gives what the trades implies, a clear path to the Stanley Cup.
 
For the moment, Karlsson represents hope rather than deeds. He was an indisputably great player in Ottawa, still has plenty of tread on the tires, and changes the Cup equation for every contender.
 
But without the advantage of the advanced hindsight that actual Stanley Cup parades can provide, he must be placed behind the following:
 
-- Barry Bonds (no title, but he is unmatched for talent, impact, stadium construction or controversy).
 
-- Kevin Durant (took the Warriors from merely great to generational, and helps with social media).
 
-- Steve Young, Fred Dean or Deion Sanders (each helped the 49ers win a Super Bowl, though Young was clearly most impactful, and two of the three got network gigs afterward).
 
-- Ted Hendricks, Willie Brown and Jim Plunkett (helped the Raiders do the same).
 
-- The re-acquisition of Rick Barry (the Warriors’ title in 1975 was largely his doing, though the Warriors’ greater strength was its ensemble quality).
 
-- Andre Iguodala (the first free agent to actively choose Golden State and the 2015 NBA Finals MVP).
 
-- Dave Stewart and Dennis Eckersley (pillars of the A’s 1989 World Series, and icons since).
 
There are others if you want to delve deeper (and hey, you’re the only who knows your work schedule), but this gives you an idea of the bar that needs clearing for the momentary enthusiasm of getting Erik Karlsson to become an enduring achievement in the annals of Bay Area talent grabs.
 
At the moment, Karlsson is probably closer to Chris Webber going to Sacramento in 1998, taking a bad team and making it a factor in a league that has shunned it before and after. The Sharks haven’t been shunned as much as they have been pandered to as the team that can’t win the big prize and has only gotten to play for it once. In other words, they’re not the Kings.
 
But the Sharks are the new hot flavor in the NHL in the way that Golden State was in 2013 and 2014. A parade permit is the limit and the expectation, and when that happens, Karlsson’s name can go on the above list.