Sharks

Sharks takeways: What we learned in 3-2 loss to Devils to end road trip

Sharks takeways: What we learned in 3-2 loss to Devils to end road trip

BOX SCORE

For the second game in a row, the Sharks entered the third period on Sunday with a 2-1 lead, and the opportunity to put another notch in the win column. It was also the second game in a row they gave up a late lead.

San Jose closed out a five-game road trip with a super speedy tilt against the Devils on Sunday. But after exchanging chances with the New Jersey Devils for two periods, New Jersey emerged victorious with the 3-2 win.

Here are three takeaways from the Sharks' final game of the five-game road trip.

The penalty kill got a lot of work in on Sunday

The Sharks likely occupied the sin bin a little more than they would’ve liked on Sunday. After drawing the first penalty of the game, the Sharks went on the kill seven consecutive times, including a dicey double-minor called on Erik Karlsson in the final minutes of the third period. The penalty kill also contributed to the Devils' win, surrendering New Jersey's first goal of the afternoon while playing on the short end of a five-on-three.

While the kill looked good outside of giving up that goal, spending so much time playing down a skater can wear a team out. Being on the penalty kill four times before the start of the third period likely contributed to San Jose having difficulty sustaining pressure in the final 20 minutes of the game.

Martin Jones was in midseason form through 40 minutes

The Sharks starter was a brick wall through the first two periods of Sunday’s game. He was particularly impressive as he robbed Devils’ forward Nico Hischier on two grade-A chances. When Kyle Palmieri punched the tying goal in past Jones’ skate in the start of the third period, it looked like the netminder was going to be able to keep it out.

But, New Jersey snagged the lead late in the game. Jones was caught out of position when Jean-Sebastian Dea deposited the game-winner.

San Jose continues creating chances, but still need more goals

Team Teal didn’t put 40-plus shots on goal like they did in their previous two games. But, like with their game against the Rangers on Thursday, they only found the back of the net a couple of times.

Sharks head coach Peter DeBoer said after the Sharks loss in New York on Thursday that the dam will eventually burst and the goals would start coming more readily. It didn't happen before San Jose headed home. 

Sharks GM Doug Wilson discusses odd end of season, coaching search

Sharks GM Doug Wilson discusses odd end of season, coaching search

On Tuesday afternoon, the NHL announced its “return to play” format, which effectively ends the season for seven clubs, including the Sharks.

San Jose now faces an offseason of unprecedented length. NHL commissioner Gary Bettman hopes the Stanley Cup can be awarded by the fall months, with the next season beginning in December or January, 2021 at the latest.

That gives Sharks general manager Doug Wilson some interesting scenarios trying to turn a team around during very abnormal times.

Wilson spoke with NBC Sports California in an exclusive interview on Tuesday. Here are some highlights from the Q&A:

NBC Sports California: On closure to this regular season, and replicating the last time the Sharks didn’t make the playoffs:
Wilson: “That’s what we’re looking to do again. You learn from experience like this. We didn’t get off to a great start this year, and that’s on us. That’s on all of us. But from this, you can grab some more knowledge and wisdom moving forward.”

On the Sharks not participating in the experimental “return to play” 24-team format that the NHL is hoping to execute:
“Make no mistake, we wish we were playing. Missing the playoffs is unacceptable for this franchise. I think we’ve only done it once since 2003. But we’re trying to make the best of it, which is the point that you’re making. To get Erik Karlsson, and Tomas Hertl, and Logan Couture and Radim Simek all back 100-percent healthy with the extra time.

"If we use this time wisely, we can come out of it better on the other side. We like our team. We have the bones of a good team. We just have to play the right way and get off to better starts to a season than we did this year.”

Does winning a Stanley Cup mean anything different in 2020?
“I don’t think it’s appropriate to put an asterisk besides it or discount the season. We’ve had other seasons without the full complement of games. The playoff format will be arduous, and whoever wins will deserve to win.”

Will announcing the next permanent head coach come soon?
“Now, we have time to build the staff that’s best going forward for this team. Bob (Boughner) has certainly got the inside track. I thought he did a good job with our team, we were playing some really good hockey, the right way, defending better, our PK (penalty kill) was good.

"And then when you lose Erik (Karlsson), Logan (Couture), and Tomas (Hertl), that makes it pretty difficult. We’re still in the middle of that process. We’ll be very thorough.”

On the Sharks' issues with goaltending and team defense:
“Goaltending gets blamed, it’s the easy target to go to. Here we had the best penalty killing in the league — same goaltending, same defensemen, same forwards, yet we struggled five on five. Whether that’s preparation, attitude, commitment, whatever it is.

"Collectively you have to look at it: how can we play better in the defensive zone? That’s all five people, to give the goaltender a chance.”

[RELATED: Where Sharks go from here now that their season is over]

What is the most uncertain aspect for the Sharks right now?
“It’s really the timeline, you want to work backwards. Players are creatures of habit. The cycles of training and preparing of training and getting ready. This will be the longest time off our team and players have ever had.

"And you’ve got to use that time very well. You don’t want players under-training, or over-training. We’ve talked with our strength and medical people, trying to figure out the best way to get the programs in place so when they come into camp, they’re ready to go.”

On the balance of sports returning soon but not too early:
“I’m proud of our ownership, our players, and our league. Health is the most important thing. This supersedes sports. This is about what’s best for our fans, the safety and good health of everybody.

"It’s going to take everybody to get through this. I’m not sure we’re completely out of the woods yet.”

NHL draft lottery: How Sharks will be impacted by league's new setup

NHL draft lottery: How Sharks will be impacted by league's new setup

Twenty-four NHL teams can now turn their full attention to the restarting of the currently-paused season. The Sharks are not one of them.

Having slipped into last place in the Western Conference just prior to the indefinite pause due to the coronavirus pandemic, San Jose did not qualify for the expanded postseason structure NHL commissioner Gary Bettman described Tuesday. The Sharks' season, as well as those of the Detroit Red Wings, Ottawa Senators, Los Angeles Kings, Anaheim Ducks, New Jersey Devils and Buffalo Sabres, are now over.

Which means, it's time to turn their attention to the offseason.

San Jose general manager Doug Wilson has his work cut out for him. The Sharks finished the abbreviated 2019-20 campaign with their worst points percentage in his 16-year tenure at the helm. There are some obvious needs that must be addressed. Of course, they won't be able to utilize their own first-round draft pick -- which they gave up in the trade to acquire Erik Karlsson -- in order to do so.

Bettman announced that the first phase of the 2020 NHL Draft lottery will be held on Friday, June 26, and really, there is no change as far as San Jose is concerned. As the team with the third-worst points percentage, the Sharks' first-round pick (owned by Ottawa) will have the same odds of landing first overall -- 11.5 percent -- as it would have anyway. Obviously, though, no matter where it ends up, the selection will belong to the Senators.

15 teams in total will be included in the lottery, which is the same as prior years. The seven teams that didn't qualify for the expanded playoffs will be joined by the eight teams that lose in the qualifying round. It's fairly complex, but as it relates to the Sharks, their first-round pick automatically will fall within the top six overall selections. Ottawa's own first-round pick is guaranteed to fall within the top five, and combined with San Jose's first-rounder, there is a great chance the Senators will have two picks in the top five, if not the top three.

That's tremendous for Ottawa, and might make things look even bleaker for the Sharks. But, the fact of the matter is, we've known San Jose wouldn't have its own first-rounder for quite some time now, and more importantly, it was the right decision to make. Hindsight is 20/20 and it's easy to question it now, but players like Karlsson are not a dime a dozen. He is on the shortlist of the best defensemen in the NHL, and the package San Jose gave up for him -- even including the 2020 first-rounder -- absolutely was worth it. You make that trade 100 times out of 100, and the same goes for the extension, too.

So, yes, the Sharks likely will miss out on a chance to acquire one of the top overall talents in the upcoming draft, but that can't be viewed in a vacuum. Not to mention, San Jose actually does own a first-round pick in the draft, which they acquired from the Tampa Bay Lightning in exchange for Barclay Goodrow at the trade deadline. 

[RELATED: What you need to know as Sharks' long offseason begins]

The Lightning had the second-best points percentage in the Eastern Conference when the season was paused, so it is impossible that their first-round selection will fall within the first 15 overall picks, as they're not subject to the qualifying round. The earlier Tampa Bay gets eliminated, however, the earlier their first-rounder -- owned by the Sharks -- will fall in the first round.

So, Sharks fans, rather than waste energy lamenting the first-rounder San Jose doesn't have, google Karlsson highlights and root against the Lightning. That ought to make you feel a little better.