Bruce Maxwell

A's C Bruce Maxwell sentenced to two years of probation

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AP

A's C Bruce Maxwell sentenced to two years of probation

PHOENIX -- Oakland Athletics catcher Bruce Maxwell has been sentenced to two years of probation on a disorderly conduct charge.

His sentencing Monday came nearly three months after he pleaded guilty to the charge in a gun-related incident.

Police say Maxwell had pointed a handgun at a woman who delivered food to his home in Scottsdale, Arizona, in October.

Police said in court documents that Maxwell lowered the gun once the woman explained why she was there. She then gave him the food and left.

Maxwell missed a four-game series in Toronto in May because he could not enter Canada while awaiting sentencing in Arizona.

Bruce Maxwell reaches plea agreement

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AP

Bruce Maxwell reaches plea agreement

Oakland A's catcher Bruce Maxwell reached a plea agreement stemming from his October arrest in Scottsdale, and will be required to serve probation and community service, the A's announced on Friday. 

“Accepting responsibility is the first step in working to make amends for my lapse in judgment," Maxwell said in a statement. "I am truly sorry for the pain that my actions have caused, and while they are not representative of who I am, I understand that I have to earn back the trust and respect of those around me.“

Maxwell pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, a class 6 undesignated offense in Arizona. The 27-year-old was was arrested on Oct. 28 in Scottsdale after allegedly pointing a gun at a food-delivery person. He initially pleaded not guilty to felony charges of aggravated assault and disorderly conduct in November,

“I am pleased Bruce has taken responsibility for his actions. We expect our players to conduct themselves in a manner that reflects the standards of the Oakland Athletics," general manager David Forst said in a statement. "His conduct in this incident did not live up to that. We have communicated with him throughout the legal process about our expectations as a representative of the organization. I believe he has already begun the work of making amends for his actions and look forward to his continued positive contributions to our community.”

Maxwell will be sentenced on June 4. 

Maxwell speaks about anthem protest, but stays mum on legal issues

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USATSI

Maxwell speaks about anthem protest, but stays mum on legal issues

When A's catcher Bruce Maxwell knelt during the anthem last season, he was the first MLB player to do so. He knelt before each of each of Oakland's final nine games, in order to protest racial inequality and in response to President Trump's incendiary comments about NFL players kneeling, but ended the season as the only MLB player to kneel during the anthem. 

This season, he won't kneel at all, he told reporters in a statement on the first day of spring training. 

“Obviously, I didn’t take that lightly,” Maxwell told the San Francisco Chronicle prior to the release of his statement.  “That was to bring awareness to a problem and the face we do see it, we do experience and we have empathy for what’s going on. This year I don’t plan on kneeling. … And we’ll move on forward.”

While Maxwell did address his protest during the anthem, he largely did not address his offseason legal issues.

“It’s ongoing, I can’t really discuss details,” he said. “It’s something me and my lawyers are handling.”

On Oct. 28, Maxwell was arrested in Scottsdale after allegedly pointing a gun at a food-delivery person. He pleaded not guilty to felony charges of aggravated assault and disorderly conduct in November, and is set for a settlement conference on April 13 after failing to reach a plea agreement on Monday, according to the Chronicle. 

If an agreement cannot be reached, Maxwell's trial is set to begin on Aug. 9.