Chris Bassitt

Chris Bassitt sends strong message to hitters facing A's tough defense

Chris Bassitt sends strong message to hitters facing A's tough defense

In 2019, Chris Bassitt pitched 40 innings less than Oakland’s team leader (Mike Fiers, 184.2).
 
Yet Bassitt struck out the most batters on his team, by 15.
 
“I’ve always been a strikeout guy,” Bassitt said via FaceTime last week. 
 
He traces that trait all the way back to high school days, because strikeouts are what scouts noticed.
 
“That was the cool, flashy thing to do,” Bassitt recalled. “Once I got into pro ball, the older levels, I almost tried to not become a strikeout pitcher, just because the efficiency of pitching.”
 
The biggest downside of K’s come with overexertion. Bassitt’s mentality actually was actually to routinely avoid going for the punch-out unless it was a two-strike count.
 
“If you go for strikeouts a lot of the times your pitch count will spike,” Bassitt said. “[Mike] Fiers can eat seven or eight innings with ease, and I’m trying to get seven innings and struggling my butt off doing it.”
 
There is also a huge conundrum with Chris’ current team. 
 
The A’s sport a Platinum Glover at third, a Gold Glover at first, and two nominees for that award at shortstop and left field. Wouldn’t it be easier to, you know, let the defense do more heavy lifting?
 
“Oh, I would love it,” Bassitt laughed. “If every person put it in play 1 or 2 pitches in, I’d be so happy.”

[RELATED: Austin Allen embracing three-way catcher competition]
 
Bassitt’s public service announcement to MLB hitters is this:
 
“We got some studs on defense, so, please put the ball in play. I would love that.”

Deebo Samuel, Jeff Samardzija highlight non-NBA Bay Area stars pickup game

Deebo Samuel, Jeff Samardzija highlight non-NBA Bay Area stars pickup game

The NBA playoffs should be in full swing during this time of year, but the coronavirus pandemic continues to leave most live sports in the United States shuddered.

In the spirit of the season, we decided to take a look at what a hypothetical pickup basketball game would look like featuring all Bay Area athletes, excluding any Warriors for obvious reasons.

Some local pro athletes like Arik Armstead were multi-sport athletes in college, even earning a spot on Oregon's basketball team for multiple seasons. Others like Jaquiski Tartt actually grew up playing only basketball, before picking up organized football during his senior season.

[RELATED: Warriors' yellow sleeves and other worst Bay Area uniforms since 2000]

We drafted 10 players from across the Bay position-by-position, with representatives from a handful of local teams.

Tell us which team you have coming out on top.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL ROSTERS

Why A's Chris Bassitt, rest of MLB players are watching KBO closely

Why A's Chris Bassitt, rest of MLB players are watching KBO closely

A’s starting pitcher Chris Bassitt, like a lot of MLB players, is keeping close tabs on the Korean Baseball (KBO) league, which began its season earlier this week. 

“First and foremost, we should all be hoping their health goes right,” Bassitt told NBC Sports California on Tuesday via FaceTime.

Not only in a sense of human interest, but also for what MLB can gain from South Korean teams returning to action first.

“If their health-wise goes right, it kind of opens the doors everyone else to tip toe back into normalcy a little bit,” Bassitt said.

But that is the unenviable challenge, a margin for error that is extremely minimal. Any mis-steps in procedure, or just flat out bad luck could cause a domino effect for sports leagues around the world.

“Obviously, that’s going to hurt our chances of doing anything,” Bassitt noted.

Outside of spectating for curiosity, it’s also been hard to miss how flashier baseball seems in Asia.

Bassitt thinks North America should take notice.

“That’s kind of how you stay relevant,” Bassitt said. “Some old timers may think that’s wrong, and I understand that.”

[RELATED: Former A's to watch in KBO]

The pitcher says he largely associates with a traditional approach to the game, but sees plenty of room for emotion and personality, for players, teams and venues.

“What we do at the Coliseum is probably the most non-old school stuff as it is,” Bassitt said. “With the drums and all that stuff. I think we need a lot more of it, to be honest with you.”