Chris Paul

Warriors' Draymond Green rips Blazers coach for 'cheating the game'

Warriors' Draymond Green rips Blazers coach for 'cheating the game'

PORTLAND -- Twenty minutes after the Warriors lost 122-112 to the Trail Blazers, Draymond Green walked into the visitor's locker room at Moda Center with a message for anyone within earshot.

"Asking for a delay of game don’t help you in the playoffs!" Green yelled.

The play that caught Green's ire happened with 5:22 left in the fourth quarter, when the Warriors' All-Star forward was set to check back into the game. Flanked with heating pads on both knees, Green was late for the substitution, causing a Blazers assistant coach to ask referees to call a delay of game. The sequence caused Green to yell obscenities toward the Blazers' bench.

Green's comments came nearly two weeks after Thunder guard Chris Paul pointed out that Timberwolves forward Jordan Bell had an untucked jersey as he checked in late in an eventual 139-127 Oklahoma City win. Paul's actions with 1.1 seconds left in the game resulted in a technical foul on the Timberwolves, helping send the game into overtime.

"Yeah, I told them his jersey was untucked," Paul said after the game. "I know the rules."

Paul's actions are personal for Green, considering the history between the two players. During Green's career, his team has defeated Paul's in three of four playoff matchups, including last season's Western Conference semifinals, when the Warriors beat the Rockets in six games, building a contentious competitive relationship. Along the way, Golden State has ended Paul's championship hopes three times.

The Blazers also have felt the Warriors' dominance in recent years, with the help of Green. Seven months ago, he averaged 16.5 points, 11.8 rebounds and nearly nine assists per game in the Western Conference finals, as Golden State eliminated Portland in a four-game sweep and cemented Green's theory Wednesday night.

[NORTHWEST: Why Draymond was why wrong with cheating accusation]

"Those that cheat the game don't win in the playoffs," Green said. "Monkey see, monkey do. 'I see one guy ask for a delay of game and get it, then I'ma ask for one.' S--t's weak. "

"But that’s the league we in. Everyone cheating the game, whether it’s cheap-a-- fouls or asking for a delay of game.”

Kings' Richaun Holmes continues to shine after crucial stop vs. Thunder

Kings' Richaun Holmes continues to shine after crucial stop vs. Thunder

NBA team used to try to post up 5-foot-9 Isaiah Thomas during his time with the Sacramento Kings. More often than not, they came up empty.

Thomas is stronger than he looks and a lot of guards aren’t comfortable playing in the post, regardless of who they are guarding.

Teams have tried to reverse this trend in the last few seasons in the league. Instead of isolating smaller players in the post, they instead try to drag bigs out to the perimeter and then take advantage of their often inferior lateral quickness.

That was the gameplan Wednesday night at Golden 1 Center. With 13.4 seconds on the clock, the Thunder made sure the ball was in Chris Paul’s hand and then worked to get the switch they were looking for.

OKC then spaced the floor, isolating Paul on center Richaun Holmes and having him go one-on-one with the 6-foot-10 big.

“You’ve just got to guard,” Holmes told NBC Sports California. “Chris Paul is a Hall of Famer, a very smart player and you’ve just got to make him as uncomfortable as possible.”

Paul started on the left elbow and crossed over Holmes while sliding to the right elbow. The 6-foot-1 guard tried to step back and fall away to create space, but Holmes stayed with him stride for stride.

“You don’t want to let your teammates down, so I was just trying to make him take as tough a shot as possible and that’s what I was able to do,” Holmes added.

Paul’s 15-foot jumper barely cleared the outstretched right arm of Holmes and hit the front rim. Harrison Barnes flew in for the rebound and the Kings came away with the 94-93 win.

It’s a lot of pressure to put on a center, but head coach Luke Walton has trust in Holmes. The crowd was on their feet begging for one more stop. While Paul is dancing around waiting for an opening, you can see the Kings locked up in man-to-man coverage, leaving Holmes alone on an island.

“I could feel the energy come up,” Holmes said of the crowd. “We were able to rally around that. It was a good feeling. It was a good feeling to come out there and even a better feeling to come away with the win.”

Trevor Ariza is in the post fighting with Steven Adams, Bogdan Bogdanovic is boxing out Danilo Gallinari and both Barnes and Cory Joseph stayed tight on their men on the perimeter.

“Yeah, he’s impressive,” Walton said of Holmes. “He’s been impressive all year. I look back at that first win we were able to get against Utah here and he switched out on [Donovan] Mitchell in that game and made a great defensive contest. He’s been one of the main points with our defense turning around where it has from the start of the season to now.”

Sacramento was atrocious on the defensive end during their 0-5 start to the season, but they’ve turned things around. The Kings currently allow the 13th-most points per game at 108.3 and they are 19th in defensive rating. There is plenty more room for improvement, but they are winning games with their defense for the first time in years.

The Kings now have won three in a row against quality opponents by a combined six points. All three games came down to the final seconds.

“It’s the NBA, we’re competing, they’re competing,” Holmes said. “The last few games we’ve been going down to the wire. That’s what you live for. You live for the opportunity to be out there on the floor and make the play. I enjoy every minute of it.”

[RELATED: Bagley's 'best basketball yet to come' after his Kings return]

The schedule gets lighter over the next few games, but the Kings are not in a position to let up. They’ve almost recovered completely from their abysmal start to the season and are starting to get healthy at the right time.

Getting Marvin Bagley back may change Holmes’ role slightly with the team, but he earns every minute with his play on both ends of the court. His defense against Paul was just a small sample of what the Kings have seen throughout the first quarter of the season from their starting center.

Why Gary Payton believes Warriors' Steph Curry isn't true point guard

curryusa.jpg
USATSI

Why Gary Payton believes Warriors' Steph Curry isn't true point guard

You might think of Steph Curry as a point guard.

After all, he's short, brings the ball up the court sometimes and appears on the far left of those nifty starting lineup graphics prior to tip-off with PG next to his name.

But in this age of run-and-gun positionless basketball, is Curry really a point guard? Not if you ask Gary Payton.

In fact, the nine-time NBA All-Star believes there only are two true point guards left in The Association.

"That's a question that is kind of difficult for old people," Payton told NBC Sports Bay Area's Logan Murdock and Kerith Burke on the "Runnin' Plays Podcast" when asked about the best point guards in today's game. "You look at Stephen Curry. You put him as a point guard. He's not a point guard. He's a two-guard. You look at [Russell] Westbrook. He's not a point guard. He's a two-guard. You look at James Harden. He's not a point guard, he's a two-guard.

"To me, there are only two guards in this league that are true point guards. That's [Rajon] Rondo and Chris Paul. 

"Now, Chris Paul has turned into a shooting guard more, but Rondo is a true point guard," Payton continued. "He looks first to get people off. He does his defense and he makes people better around him. Not, let me score 30. Not, let me shoot a jump shot first. He's not doing that ... If we name a lot of point guards that's right now in this NBA, they are not point guards."

At least Harden can finally be in the same category as Steph, right?

[RELATED: Loss to Knicks shows Warriors have earned NBA's worst record]

While Steph might not be the prototypical point guard in the old-fashioned sense, there's no doubt he'll one day be enshrined in Springfield, Mass., as one of the greatest scoring guards in NBA history.

In any era, that's pretty, pretty good.