Colin Kaepernick

Malcolm Jenkins: Blake Bortles shows Colin Kaepernick deserves NFL job

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Malcolm Jenkins: Blake Bortles shows Colin Kaepernick deserves NFL job

Panthers safety Eric Reid and Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins don't see eye-to-eye on everything when it comes to handling social justice. 

The two had to be separated before playing each other Sunday. "We believe a lot of players should have stepped up for Colin," Reid told reporters in Philadelphia after the game. "I believe Malcolm capitalized on the situation. He co-opted the movement that was started by Colin to get his organization funded. It's cowardly. He sold us out."

At the same time, both safeties clearly have the same views on one part of Colin Kaepernick: The former 49ers quarterback deserves a job in the NFL. 

"We've always maintained, I know I've always maintained, and every chance I get to say Colin Kaepernick has started this. Eric Reid deserves a job. Colin Kaepernick deserves a job," Jenkins said to reporters Wednesday. "I can turn on the tape this week in our opponent and see that Colin Kaepernick deserves a job."

On Sunday, Jenkins' Eagles play quarterback Blake Bortles and the Jaguars. Bortles is ranked last in Matt Maiocco's lastest QB Power Rankings, and he was benched in the second half last week. 

In seven games this season, Bortles has thrown for 1,735 yards and nine touchdowns with eight interceptions while completing 60.6 percent of his passes -- which actually is a career high. The Jaguars are just 3-4 one season after making it to AFC Championship Game.

When Kaepernick last played in the NFL two seasons ago, he completed 59.8 percent of his passes while gaining 2,241 yards in 12 games. He tossed 16 touchdowns to four interceptions. 

Eric Reid, Malcolm Jenkins have to be separated before Eagles-Panthers

Eric Reid, Malcolm Jenkins have to be separated before Eagles-Panthers

Carolina Panthers safety Eric Reid and Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins jawed on the field ahead of Sunday's game at Lincoln Financial Field, as tensions surrounding the NFL Players Coalition spilled over on to the field.

The two had to be separated, and Panthers wide receiver Torrey Smith -- a teammate of Reid's in San Francisco and Jenkins' in Philadelphia -- tried to restrain Smith on the sideline. 

Jenkins spearheaded a group that formed the Players Coalition last year. They met with NFL owners last October, as players continued to protest police brutality and racial inequality during the playing of the national anthem before games.

Reid, the first player to protest during the national anthem alongside former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, withdrew from the coalition in November. He claimed Kaepernick was kicked out of the group and Jenkins spoke with NFL owners on his own accord.

After Sunday's game, Reid called Jenkins "a sellout."

"We believe a lot of players should have stepped up for Colin," Reid told reporters in Philadelphia. "I believe Malcolm capitalized on the situation. He co-opted the movement that was started by Colin to get his organization funded. It's cowardly. He sold us out."

Reid said he was fighting systemic oppression and neocolonialism. When asked, Reid said he would consider Jenkins a neo-colonialist. 

Jenkins previously denied Kaepernick was kicked out of the Players Coalition, but Mark Geragos, the quarterback's attorney, told Slate last year that they "were verbatim told that Colin had no role" in the group. On Sunday, Jenkins declined to address what Reid said. 

"I'm not going to say anything negative about that man," Jenkins said. "I respect him. I'm glad he has a job back in the league."

The Players Coalition and the NFL officially partnered to donate a minimum of $90 million to programs fighting social inequality in May. Reid expressed his reservations with the group last November, telling Slate at the time that "Malcolm conveyed to us ... that the money would come from funds that are already allocated to breast cancer awareness and Salute to Service."  In October, he called the Players Coalition "an NFL-funded subversion group," shortly after signing a one-year contract with the Carolina Panthers. 

Reid remained unsigned until that point, and filed a collusion grievance against the league in May. Jenkins said Sunday that he believed Reid's "stance was the only reason he was not in the league, so I'm glad that was rectified."

After the game, Kaepernick tweeted his support of Reid. 

Steve Kerr backs Colin Kaepernick, dissects issues preventing QB's NFL return

Steve Kerr backs Colin Kaepernick, dissects issues preventing QB's NFL return

NFL players’ protests of social injustice -- in the form of kneeling during the national anthem before games -- quickly became a hot-button issue among Americans, and President Donald Trump routinely mentions it at rallies across the country.

Colin Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback who first kneeled during the anthem, seems to have paid a heavy price for his protest. He hasn’t played in the league since 2016, and he reportedly has no prospects of joining a team anytime soon.

That bothers Warriors coach Steve Kerr, who recently told NBC Sports Bay Area’s Monte Poole that he believes patriotism isn’t standing for the anthem. It’s doing something good for others -- which NFL players routinely do.

“That’s what drives me crazy about the uproar over the NFL players who have knelt in a fight for social justice. So many of them have given so much to their communities -- given not just money but time,” Kerr said in the latest installment of a five-part interview only available on the MyTeams by NBC Sports app. “I read a lot about Malcolm Jenkins in Philadelphia and what he’s done in his community. And Chris Long. And people like Colin Kaepernick who have given $1 million to charity.

“I’m so proud of so many athletes who are out there in their communities, knowing the power they have and the financial resources they have to make a change. That’s patriotism to me. The anthem is just kind of a symbol for that.”

Trump’s camp believes kneeling disrespects the military and the nation, while those on the other side say it’s a necessary statement to call attention to a large societal issue.

Kerr said he doesn’t care one way or another if the anthem is played at sporting events, and that he backs Kaepernick “100 percent.” But Kerr also understands why an NFL team might be hesitant to sign the quarterback, right or wrong.

“I see this incredible intersection of modern media and propaganda meets capitalism meets racism. It’s all meeting at the same time,” Kerr said. "… But I also see this entire media frenzy that surrounds it.

“And if I’m a GM of a team, I know the minute I sign Colin Kaepernick, it’s like signing Tim Tebow. Or it’s like signing, you know, one of the Ball brothers. And that’s probably a bad analogy. But it’s going to come with a storm. So even if your heart’s in the right place, and you go, ‘You know what? This is all BS,’ I want my team to be able to function. And I want to bring in a backup quarterback. But I don’t want a news conference every single day. I could see a GM going, ‘Man, I don’t really want to deal with that.’ That’s modern media. That’s modern American life.

“So all these forces come together and, unfortunately, they create a stone wall for Kaepernick and others. But they expose all these different dynamics of modern life in this country. Some of it is racism. Some of it is fake patriotism. And some of it is this mass media, this monster that needs to be fed every day. It can be overwhelming.”

To watch the full Kerr interview, download the MyTeams app, and stick around all season for complete Warriors coverage as they go for the three-peat.