Headstrong

How to watch HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports on NBC Sports Network

How to watch HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports on NBC Sports Network

Mental health in sports in an important topic that rarely is discussed. Often times, players, fans and media alike are too focused on wins, losses, stats and milestones to see or discuss how players cope with the immense amount of stress that comes with being a professional athlete. 

In NBC Sports' new documentary "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" athletes do their best to try to change the narrative surrounding mental health and sports. Joe Thornton, Charles Haley, Kevon Looney and other athletes from around the country open about their own personal battles with depression, anxiety, addiction and other mental health issues they fought while playing the sport they love and continue to fight.

"HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" has been running all November long on the NBC Sports family of networks and it will air again Wednesday night on NBC Sports Network following Flyers vs. Blue Jackets on "Wednesday Night Hockey."

You can watch all of the "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" vignettes right here and can check out Devin Setoguchi and Sydel Curry-Lee appear on a panel at the NBC Sports Bay Area studios to discuss the film right here.

[RELATED: Ex-Giants coach Flannery details depression in HEADSTRONG]

Here's when and how to watch "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" on NBC Sports Network:

When: Wednesday, Nov. 27, at 7:30 p.m. PT
TV Channel: NBC Sports Network

Ex-Giants coach Tim Flannery details bout with depression in HEADSTRONG

Ex-Giants coach Tim Flannery details bout with depression in HEADSTRONG

Depression isn't selective. It can hit any one of us at any time without warning.

Whether you're a major league baseball coach, high school teacher, stock trader or something else, depression isn't picky and it is hell on whoever it hits.

Former Giants coach Tim Flannery detailed his own bout with depression after the death of his father for the NBC Sports documentary "HEADSTRONG: Mental health and sports."

"When you're out there all alone, in cities away from support, it's really easy to have your mind go a different route and convince you of a whole bunch of things," Flannery said. "Because people lose their families, they lose themselves in the demand of the schedule and the demand of trying to win. 

"It's difficult. There was a year in [1999] after my dad passed away -- he died viciously of Alzheimer's and he was 73 years old," Flannery continued. "I was dealing with that every day then coaching in the big leagues every night. After that year, I went into a chemical depression where I couldn't get out of bed for 13 months. I was chronic fatigue.

"I didn't think I was ever going to get well again. Alone, weeping, medicating. It's not actually just the game but it's all that comes with it that people don't see that causes other reactions. But you've got to find a way to stay healthy."

For Flannery, it was his love of music that helped him during his bout with depression and throughout his playing and coaching career.

"If I didn't have my music, that saved me night after night," Flannery said. "Music therapy you realize what it does to you -- makes you feel really good. My music is my way to help others through performing. The music's been a great friend and it's gotten better and better and better. Just like anything else, you have to do the reps, you got to do the shows, you got to play the games, you got to play over and over and over to get to a point where you look back and you realize that if you work hard and if you prepare and if you dream -- some of those dreams can come true."

[RELATED: Watch all of the vignettes from HEADSTRONG]

You can watch all of the "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" vignettes right here. The full documentary will be playing all month on NBC Sports Bay Area and NBC Sports California.

Check our channel listings page for times and dates.

Ex-A's catcher Bruce Maxwell details mental toll of kneeling in HEADSTRONG

Ex-A's catcher Bruce Maxwell details mental toll of kneeling in HEADSTRONG

"It made me feel a little lost in the world."

Former A's catcher Bruce Maxwell made history on Sept. 23, 2017, by being the first MLB player to kneel during the national anthem in protest of racial inequality and police brutality. 

He detailed that day to NBC Sports Bay Area/California in NBC Sports' documentary, "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports."

"When I got to the field, I immediately walked into my manager's office -- had a sit down with him and our GM in private, told them what I was going to do, told them how I was going to go about it -- told them my plan, reasons, and shed a few tears because it's a heartfelt subject for me ... " 

Maxwell knew the backlash he would receive, he just wasn't prepared for the magnitude of it. He received death threats -- and still does to this day.

"The fact that somebody actually took the time to find out what school my sister coached basketball at in Texas, somebody took the time to find out where my mother lived," he explained. 

Maxwell then admitted he rarely left home when he headed back to Arizona following the event. 

"I was miserable," he said. 

He didn't want to do anything. Not exercise, not even talking to his parents.

"At that moment in time, I was standing for something way bigger than myself," Maxwell explained.

Just a few weeks later, the 28-year-old made headlines once again when he was arrested at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and disorderly conduct after he allegedly pointed a gun at a food delivery worker.

Maxwell told NBC Sports Bay Area/California he was in a certain mental state, and in addition to what was currently going on, he felt he needed to grab his gun in order to protect himself.

"I'm in my house, I'm defending myself, just in case this happens to be one of these crazy-ass people that are sending me threats," Maxwell said

He didn't feel like himself. Not even like a human being, he explained.

[RELATED: Marcus Semien shares mental health journey]

But now, he's freely talking about it and wants to leave his mark on the world with more than just what's going on between the foul lines.

You can watch all of the "HEADSTRONG: Mental Health and Sports" vignettes right here. The full documentary will play all month on NBC Sports Bay Area and NBC Sports California.

Check our channel listings page for times and dates.