Rickey Henderson

Why Rickey Henderson should be seen as one of Michael Jordans of MLB

Why Rickey Henderson should be seen as one of Michael Jordans of MLB

There will never be another Michael Jordan. But there could be those who hold a prominent role in the sport they play. The “Michael Jordan” of baseball, for instance. 

Bleacher Report composed a list of MLB’s G.O.A.T.s, and yes -- Los Angeles Angels superstar Mike Trout was mentioned. You can’t create a greatest of all time without mentioning him, but the A’s have an MJ of their own in Rickey Henderson.

Not only did the BR writeup mention the numbers that put the Man of Steal on the map (1,406 stolen bases, 2,295 runs, both MLB records), but it’s a great reminder of his “greatest of all-time speech.”

That iconic moment wasn’t initially supposed to happen in the way it played out. When he took the microphone after breaking St. Louis Cardinals star Lou Brock’s base-stealing record, Henderson went off-script

The original hand-written speech that was folded up on a piece of paper, and in Rickey's uniform didn’t happen, and it certainly didn’t possess the words saying he was the greatest -- even though the Hall of Famer was. He was caught up in the moment and said the epic words which solidified such a strong career.

[RELATED: Veteran pitcher Bartolo Colon still wants to play]

Henderson simply forgot about the original words.

Henderson also had a certain swag and attitude about him -- remind you of anyone else?

Rickey Henderson's 'greatest of all time' speech wasn't part of plan

Rickey Henderson's 'greatest of all time' speech wasn't part of plan

One of the most iconic moments in Oakland A's history wasn't supposed to happen the way it played out.

On May 1, 1991 -- 29 years ago today -- A's outfielder Rickey Henderson stole the 939th base of his Hall of Fame career, breaking the record held by former St. Louis Cardinals star Lou Brock.

The game stopped to honor Henderson, and the flashy superstar said "Today, I am the greatest of all time."

It's a phrase no one will ever forget, but according to Brock, Henderson went off script.

In a column posted on Friday, ESPN's Tim Kurkjian recalled a chat he had with Brock during Hall of Fame weekend in Cooperstown, New York a few years ago.

"Brock said that he and Rickey had grown close during Henderson's pursuit, and together they wrote a short speech that Rickey would read, on the field, immediately after he broke the record.

Rickey would keep the speech in the pocket of his uniform. But when Henderson stole base No. 939, he got caught up in the moment, started speaking, as Brock, watching from a distance, said, "No, Rickey, the speech?!''

Brock smiled. He spoke to Rickey. Rickey said, 'Sorry, I forgot.' "

We're sure the speech Henderson and Brock prepared would have been great, but it would not have topped Henderson proclaiming himself the "greatest of all time."

[RELATED: Henderson inducted into Bay Area Sports HOF]

Whenever Henderson or any other star athlete goes off script, it's usually gold for everybody watching.

Nine unique MLB statistics from Giants, A's players that stand out

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AP

Nine unique MLB statistics from Giants, A's players that stand out

Former A's legend Rickey Henderson had a way of stealing bases that would land him in the MLB record books.

Giants icon Barry Bonds' ability to hit homers and draw walks would put him in the same rarefied air as the "Man of Steal."

Those two Bay Area baseball legends, along with several more familiar names would create a sense of baseball history nobody would be able to mimic, even over a long career.

Here are some statistics and unique numbers from Bay Area baseball players that landed in the record books and became a notable part of MLB history.

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