Trevor Ariza

NBA opt-out tracker: Every player who declined to return for playoffs

NBA opt-out tracker: Every player who declined to return for playoffs

The NBA season will resume at the end of the month, with the Kings and 21 other teams each playing eight seeding games at Disney's ESPN Wide World of Sports in Orlando, Florida in order to determine the 16-team playoff bracket.

Not every player will be there.

Some are concerned about injuries, some are concerned about leaving their families and some are concerned about playing in a state that quickly has become one of the world's worst hotspots for the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

[RELATED: Bagley ready to play if Kings can fit him in rotation]

Teams reportedly had to submit their travel parties on July 1, but news continues to trickle about what all 22 look like. Here's every player who has opted out of the restarted NBA season so far.

Taurean Prince, SF

The Nets are running out of players.

ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported Tuesday, citing sources, that Brooklyn forward Taurean Prince tested positive for the coronavirus and will not play in the NBA season restart.

Prince joins Spencer Dinwiddie, DeAndre Jordan and Wilson Chandler as Nets who won't be traveling to Orlando this week.

Brooklyn now has the ability to sign four replacement players if they choose to.

Spencer Dinwiddie, SG

Brooklyn Nets guard Spencer Dinwiddie announced he would not be traveling to Orlando with the Nets. Dinwiddie cited another positive coronavirus test and the symptoms of the virus as reason to stay home.

The Nets now will be without Dinwiddie, Kyrie Irving, DeAndre Jordan and Kevin Durant in Orlando.

Bradley Beal, SG

The Wizards push for the eighth and final playoff seed in the Eastern Conference took another hit when the team announced that star guard Bradley Beal would not make the trip to Orlando due to a shoulder injury.

Washington now will be without Beal, Davis Bertans and John Wall in Orlando.

Victor Oladipo, Indiana Pacers SG

Oladipo was not the first player who decided not to go to Orlando, but he's the biggest name as of this writing. The 28-year-old ruptured his quadriceps tendon earlier this season, and Oladipo told ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski on July 3 that he opted out in order to avoid getting injured again.

"A part of rehab is working your way back and getting yourself to [100 percent]," Oladipo explained, "so at the end of the day, going back and turning things up as quickly as we're about to do, and pretty much going to playoff formation and playoff games after eight games, I'm more susceptible to injury than anyone else is. So it's not about now. It's about longevity."

Davis Bertans, Washington Wizards PF

The Latvian sharpshooter became the first healthy player on a roster to opt out of playing in Orlando when he did so last month. Bertans, 27, averaged a career-high 15.4 points per game and is set to become an unrestricted free agent. With the Wizards likely only to make the playoffs as the Eastern Conference's eighth seed after winning a play-in series with the Brooklyn Nets, Bertans decided not to play.

"Davis is about to sign the biggest deal of his life, so he would be taking a big risk by playing," Arturs Kalnitis, Bertans' agent, told HoopsHype on June 22. "It wasn’t a tough decision, to be honest. If the Wizards were in the fifth or sixth seed (or maybe even the eighth seed), it would be completely different. Davis is a competitor. But in this situation, he decided to sit out.”

Trevor Ariza, Portland Trail Blazers SF

Ariza, who the Kings traded to the Trail Blazers ahead of this year's trade deadline, reportedly won't play in Orlando in order to spend time with his 12-year-old son. The 34-year-old is involved in a custody case with the boy's mother, and Ariza would've missed a court-ordered one-month visitation period with his son by playing.

Avery Bradley, Los Angeles Lakers SG

Bradley told ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski on June 23 that he wouldn't join the Lakers in Orlando because of the unlikelihood that his 6-year-old son Liam would be medically cleared to join him in the later rounds. The younger Bradley has previously struggled to recover from respiratory illnesses.

"As committed to my Lakers teammates and the organization as I am, I ultimately play basketball for my family," the elder Bradley, who's married with three children, said. "And so, at a time like this, I can't imagine making any decision that might put my family's health and well-being at even the slightest risk."

The Lakers signed J.R. Smith to replace Bradley on their roster. The Kings are scheduled to play the Lakers on Aug. 13.

Willie Cauley-Stein, Dallas Mavericks C

Cauley-Stein and his partner are expecting a child in July, and the former Kings and Warriors big man reportedly decided to opt out as a result.

The Kings are scheduled to play the Mavericks on Aug. 4.

Wilson Chandler, Brooklyn Nets SF

Chandler, 33, told ESPN on June 28 he would not play in Orlando in order to spend time with his grandmother and three children.

"As difficult as it will be to not be with my teammates, the health and well-being of my family has to come first," Chandler said. "Thank you to the Nets organization for understanding and supporting me in this decision, and I will be watching and rooting for our team in Orlando."

Chandler is set to become an unrestricted free agent this offseason. The Kings are scheduled to play the Nets on Aug. 7.

DeAndre Jordan, Brooklyn Nets C

Jordan tweeted on June 29 that he won't play in Orlando after testing positive for COVID-19 while still in Brooklyn.


Thabo Sefalosha, Houston Rockets SG

Wojnarowski reported July 1 that Sefalosha opted out of playing. The Rockets agreed to a deal with Luc Mbah a Moute to replace Sefalosha on the roster, according to multiple reports.

The Kings are scheduled to play the Rockets on Aug. 9.

NBA rumors: Blazers forward Trevor Ariza opts out of Orlando restart

NBA rumors: Blazers forward Trevor Ariza opts out of Orlando restart

On Monday, Washington Wizards forward Davis Bertans became the first player to officially sidestep the bubble experience in Orlando and he might have broken the dam.

ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported Monday, citing sources, that veteran forward Trevor Ariza has also decided against traveling to Disney World in early July, but his reasoning is much more complex than Bertans’ impending free agency.

Ariza, who is in a custody case over his son, has chosen to step away from the restart to spend a month with the 12-year-old.

The 34-year-old forward signed a two-year, $25 million contract with the Sacramento Kings in the summer of 2019. After struggling through the early part of the season, general manager Vlade Divac traded Ariza to the Portland Trail Blazers, along with Wenyen Gabriel and Caleb Swanigan, for Kent Bazemore and Anthony Tolliver at the trade deadline.

After moving to Portland, Ariza stepped into the starting lineup for the Blazers and helped solidify their rotation. In 21 starts, Ariza averaged 11 points, 4.8 rebounds and shot 40 percent from long range in 33.4 minutes per game.

Portland is in a virtual tie with both the Kings and New Orleans Pelicans for ninth place in the Western Conference standings. All three teams trail the Memphis Grizzlies by three and half games for the No. 8 seed.

Losing Ariza is a huge blow for the Blazers, although beginning on Tuesday, they’ll have an opportunity to fill his roster spot as the NBA opens a short free agency period from June 23-30.

[RELATED: Source: Kings prepared to sign Brewer]

Portland will regain the services of big men Zach Collins and Jusuf Nurkic during the restart. Collins played just three games before injuring his shoulder early in the season. Nurkic has yet to suit up after a catastrophic leg injury last season.

With Ariza out of the picture, the Blazers will be in the market for wing depth. According to a league source, the Kings are set to take one option off the table with the signing of free agent Corey Brewer to fill out their final roster spot.

Odds of Rockets missing 27 straight 3-pointers vs. Warriors was insane

Odds of Rockets missing 27 straight 3-pointers vs. Warriors was insane

It was a (non) shooting display unlike anything we have ever seen.

On this day two years ago, May 28, 2018, the Houston Rockets set an NBA playoff record by missing 27 consecutive 3-pointers in their Game 7 loss to the Warriors in the Western Conference finals.

The Rockets led by 15 points in the first half, but due to a classic Warriors third-quarter explosion -- and all those Houston missed 3s -- Golden State walked away with a 101-92 victory.

It’s a highlight that has been the bane of the Rockets’ existence for the last two years, and one that Warriors fans love to jeer about at any given moment.

But just how unlikely were those 27 straight misses?

Two years ago, FiveThirtyEight did the math and well, it was highly improbable.

As in, 1-in-72,000 improbable.

[RUNNIN' PLAYS PODCAST: Listen to the latest episode]

FiveThirtyEight published a story the day after the game that used Quantified Shot Probability (qSP) data in order to “weigh the likelihood of a shot going in depending on who’s taking it, how close the nearest defender is to the shot, and how quickly that player is closing out -- from Second Spectrum and NBA Advanced Stats, which use high-level cameras to track on-court movement.”

With this data in hand, FiveThirtyEight concluded that the “Rockets embarked on an approximately 1-in-72,000 cold streak from deep at the worst possible time, with a trip to the Finals on the line.”

Wow.

The Rockets’ misses were spread pretty evenly throughout the team, led by James Harden, of course, who went 0-10 during the span (Harden shot 36.7 percent from deep during the 2017-18 regular season). Eric Gordon (35.9 percent) missed seven, and Trevor Ariza (36.8 percent) missed six of his own.

[RELATED: Watch Steph and Klay's 10 most clutch shots of career]

Happy two-year anniversary to this glorious game, Warriors fans. And next time the odds might seem long, remember that stranger things have happened. 

One-in-72,000 strange.

[SPORTS UNCOVERED: Listen to the latest episode]