Warriors

Andrew Bogut denies bitterness to Warriors: 'I'm a sarcastic a--hole'

Andrew Bogut denies bitterness to Warriors: 'I'm a sarcastic a--hole'

Andrew Bogut sustained a season-ending knee injury early in the third quarter of Game 5 of the 2016 NBA Finals.

The Warriors lost Games 6 and 7 to the Cavaliers, and Golden State traded Bogut a couple of weeks later to make room for Kevin Durant.

"Look, I’m not stupid, man,” Bogut told Anthony Slater of The Athletic following his season debut in San Antonio. “The dude they made cap space for, I mean, look who he is. I’m not an idiot. You know, if it was someone else, a 12th man, I’d be pissed. But it’s one of the best players in basketball. So I totally get it.

"Was I disappointed? Of course. I wasn’t happy to get traded from a team that just went 73-9, went to the Finals, thought we had a chance to win it but didn’t. But as far as hating the Warriors? No. I kept in touch with all the guys in this locker room -- Andre, Draymond, Steph, Klay at times. Former guys like Harrison (Barnes). Steve would text me."

If you remember, things weren't exactly peachy between Bogut and the Warriors when the big man was shipped out of town.

As NBC Sports Bay Area's Monte Poole wrote back in late June 2016:

The team has grown frustrated by Bogut’s unreliability, particularly in times of greatest need ... Bogut’s well-documented injury history, according to sources, accounts for only part of the team’s annoyance ... the Warriors apparently were displeased with much of Bogut’s postseason work prior to the injury.

In November 2016, prior to Bogut facing the Warriors for the first time, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2005 draft told Sam Amick:

"I don’t buy into the sources thing. I don’t buy into all that (expletive), because this league is so two-faced and everybody is so fake. The same people who made those comments will see me tomorrow and shake my hand and ask me how my family is. This league is full of people who are full of (expletive) and shallow, and that’s what you figure out in pro sports. It’s very hard to meet a genuine person who you can call your friend in this league."

Bogut understands how his comments were perceived as him taking a shot at the Warriors. But he can explain.

[LISTEN: Warriors Outsiders Podcast: Dubs drop Bogut's debut in San Antonio]

"From afar, if you’re just reading text and you’re not looking at my body language or my mannerisms, there’s a lot of things I can say that can be misconstrued," he told The Athletic. "A s--tload of things.

"I’m a sarcastic a--hole. I like to have fun, say things. Sometimes if you’re reading in the form of text, it can come off different.”

Very true, Andrew. Very true.

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Why Adam Silver would like Warriors, Kings games to tip-off earlier

Why Adam Silver would like Warriors, Kings games to tip-off earlier

Warriors and Kings fans are lucky. They can always watch their favorite NBA team at a reasonable time, and even watch Eastern Conference stars thanks to start times on the West Coast. 

Those on the East Coast, however, aren't as lucky. NBA commissioner Adam Silver realizes this is an issue for half of his league's fan base, especially with the Warriors on the West Coast and LeBron James leaving the Eastern Conference for the Lakers. 

"Sometimes I forget, fifty percent of television households in this country are in the Eastern time zone," Silver recently said on NBC's TODAY. "And so if your West Coast games start at 10:30 at night in the East, you’re invariably going to lose a lot of viewers around 11, 11:30. I mean, you can just chart it.

"You see how many television households turn off around 11:15, 11:30 at night, just because people have to get up for work in the morning."

How does the NBA fix this issue? Silver says the league is looking at solutions, and that can significantly affect teams like the Kings and Warriors. 

"I mean, it is something we can address. We’re talking about it," Silver said. "I mean, it would obviously be less convenient to those fans on the West Coast if we played even earlier. I mean, just think about people getting to those arenas after work if you start a game at 6 p.m. local time in the West.

"It’s not the most convenient thing. It’s not as convenient for a television watcher on the West coast, either." 

Silver has to look at the league as a whole, however, and think more nation than local. 

[RELATED: Dubs plan to balance rest, brilliance heading to Finals]

"When you look at the league from a national standpoint, it may make sense to play a little bit earlier in the West," Silver said. "And that’s something we’re going to talk to our teams about this summer.”

Those looking to go to a game in Sacramento or San Francisco might not like it, but it seems almost inevitable that start times to games could be bumped up in the near future.

Draymond Green explains how he's able to elevate game in NBA playoffs

Draymond Green explains how he's able to elevate game in NBA playoffs

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Draymond Green is almost always at his best when his best is required.

Therefore, the Warriors forward embodies "competitive greatness," which is at the very top of John Wooden's "Pyramid of Success."

"Over the course of my career, I've been able to elevate my level of play in the postseason -- whether that was NCAA Tournament or playoffs," Draymond told reporters after practice Thursday. "I don't know. I think some people kind of just have that. The stakes are bigger, and you're able to increase your level of focus; increase your intensity level.

"I'm blessed and thankful that I have that. I can't sit here and act like, 'it's just me and macho.' I think some people have that and some people don't. I think I'm just blessed to have that ability ... to be able to rise to that occasion."

If you don't believe this to be true, let's compare the three-time NBA champion's per-game numbers:

2014-15

  • Regular season: 11.7 points, 8.2 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 1.6 steals, 1.3 blocks
  • Playoffs: 13.7 points, 10.1 rebounds, 5.2 assists, 1.8 steals, 1.2 blocks
     

2015-16

  • Regular season: 14.0 points. 9.5 rebounds, 7.4 assists, 1.5 steals, 1.4 blocks
  • Playoffs: 15.4 points, 9.9 rebounds, 6.0 assists, 1.6 steals, 1.8 blocks


2016-17

-Regular season: 10.2 points, 7.9 rebounds, 7.0 assists, 2.0 steals, 1.4 blocks
-Playoffs: 13.1 points, 9.1 rebounds, 6.5 assists, 1.8 steals, 1.6 blocks

2017-18

  • Regular season: 11.0 points, 7.6 rebounds, 7.3 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.3 blocks
  • Playoffs: 10.8 points, 10.6 rebounds, 8.1 assists, 2.0 steals, 1.5 blocks


2018-19

  • Regular season: 7.4 points, 7.3 rebounds, 6.9 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.1 blocks
  • Playoffs: 13.6 points, 9.9 rebounds, 8.2 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.7 blocks


The majority of players get worse in the playoffs when things get harder. It's the opposite for Draymond.

The day before the Warriors completed the sweep of the Trail Blazers in the Western Conference finals, the 2017 Defensive Player of the Year said he views playoff games as "life or death."

Has that mentality always been there?

[RELATEDMcCollum explains why Dubs different are from rest of NBA]

"My third year [the 2014-15 NBA season], when I was a starter, it's been that way since," Draymond told reporters at the time. "That's just the way it feels to me. I remember the first time we won the Finals -- it was like somebody had a clamp on my lungs and I didn't breathe well for seven weeks. And then when we won, it was like, 'Wow. Someone just took the clamp and I could breathe again.'

"That's just how it's felt for me since I've been a starter and playing in the playoffs. And I try to keep that feeling because it means something. And I think it should mean something.

"Leave it all out there and if it don't work out, you can live with that. But I can't live with myself knowing that I didn't leave it all out there when it mattered most."

The Warriors are lucky to have Draymond Green.

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