Warriors

Bob Myers identifies 'the best part' of Andrew Bogut rejoining Warriors

Bob Myers identifies 'the best part' of Andrew Bogut rejoining Warriors

Where would the Warriors be right now if they hadn't signed Andrew Bogut in March?

In light of DeMarcus Cousins tearing his quad in Game 2 of the NBA playoffs against the Clippers, Bogut's late addition is looking like a shrewd move.

"He's a necessity right now," Warriors general manager Bob Myers told NBC Sports Bay Area's Greg Papa during Pregame Live on Wednesday night. "He's doing great." 

The move apparently was months in the making. According to Myers, the idea of bringing Bogut back from Australia was first floated in December.

"When Damian Jones got hurt, I got on the plane, I think I was on the trip or the next one, and whether it was Draymond or Kerr, somebody grabbed me and kinda said 'What about Bogut?'" Myers said. "And I said 'Yeah, he's an option.' And it's fascinating, because that decision, we can always find who to give credit to, but it was almost an organizational thing where the players were saying it, Kerr was open to it and our front office, obviously Larry Harris went out and saw him."

Bogut's first tenure with the Warriors ended following the 2016 NBA Finals. The Warriors signed Kevin Durant and needed to clear contracts to accommodate his salary, so Bogut was sent to the Dallas Mavericks.

"The best part of it is, most of the time when you trade a player away, there are bitter feelings, right?" Myers said. "And he had every right to feel that way even though we were getting Durant. But he wanted to come back. And he had other opportunities."

In another trying season full of drama and free agency rumors, Myers appreciates the clear mind Bogut has brought to the Warriors.

"Just the kind of joy he's playing with has been great for us because he hasn't been through some of the rigmarole of the last few years," Myers said. "So he's coming in with a great attitude, which has been great for us."

[RELATED: Bogut responds to Embiid's comments]

So, where would the Warriors be right now without Bogut? Probably starting Kevon Looney and playing Jordan Bell a lot more minutes than they'd prefer.

Yeah, we'd say the reunion with Bogut has worked out well for both sides.

Why Adam Silver would like Warriors, Kings games to tip-off earlier

Why Adam Silver would like Warriors, Kings games to tip-off earlier

Warriors and Kings fans are lucky. They can always watch their favorite NBA team at a reasonable time, and even watch Eastern Conference stars thanks to start times on the West Coast. 

Those on the East Coast, however, aren't as lucky. NBA commissioner Adam Silver realizes this is an issue for half of his league's fan base, especially with the Warriors on the West Coast and LeBron James leaving the Eastern Conference for the Lakers. 

"Sometimes I forget, fifty percent of television households in this country are in the Eastern time zone," Silver recently said on NBC's TODAY. "And so if your West Coast games start at 10:30 at night in the East, you’re invariably going to lose a lot of viewers around 11, 11:30. I mean, you can just chart it.

"You see how many television households turn off around 11:15, 11:30 at night, just because people have to get up for work in the morning."

How does the NBA fix this issue? Silver says the league is looking at solutions, and that can significantly affect teams like the Kings and Warriors. 

"I mean, it is something we can address. We’re talking about it," Silver said. "I mean, it would obviously be less convenient to those fans on the West Coast if we played even earlier. I mean, just think about people getting to those arenas after work if you start a game at 6 p.m. local time in the West.

"It’s not the most convenient thing. It’s not as convenient for a television watcher on the West coast, either." 

Silver has to look at the league as a whole, however, and think more nation than local. 

[RELATED: Dubs plan to balance rest, brilliance heading to Finals]

"When you look at the league from a national standpoint, it may make sense to play a little bit earlier in the West," Silver said. "And that’s something we’re going to talk to our teams about this summer.”

Those looking to go to a game in Sacramento or San Francisco might not like it, but it seems almost inevitable that start times to games could be bumped up in the near future.

Draymond Green explains how he's able to elevate game in NBA playoffs

Draymond Green explains how he's able to elevate game in NBA playoffs

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Draymond Green is almost always at his best when his best is required.

Therefore, the Warriors forward embodies "competitive greatness," which is at the very top of John Wooden's "Pyramid of Success."

"Over the course of my career, I've been able to elevate my level of play in the postseason -- whether that was NCAA Tournament or playoffs," Draymond told reporters after practice Thursday. "I don't know. I think some people kind of just have that. The stakes are bigger, and you're able to increase your level of focus; increase your intensity level.

"I'm blessed and thankful that I have that. I can't sit here and act like, 'it's just me and macho.' I think some people have that and some people don't. I think I'm just blessed to have that ability ... to be able to rise to that occasion."

If you don't believe this to be true, let's compare the three-time NBA champion's per-game numbers:

2014-15

  • Regular season: 11.7 points, 8.2 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 1.6 steals, 1.3 blocks
  • Playoffs: 13.7 points, 10.1 rebounds, 5.2 assists, 1.8 steals, 1.2 blocks
     

2015-16

  • Regular season: 14.0 points. 9.5 rebounds, 7.4 assists, 1.5 steals, 1.4 blocks
  • Playoffs: 15.4 points, 9.9 rebounds, 6.0 assists, 1.6 steals, 1.8 blocks


2016-17

-Regular season: 10.2 points, 7.9 rebounds, 7.0 assists, 2.0 steals, 1.4 blocks
-Playoffs: 13.1 points, 9.1 rebounds, 6.5 assists, 1.8 steals, 1.6 blocks

2017-18

  • Regular season: 11.0 points, 7.6 rebounds, 7.3 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.3 blocks
  • Playoffs: 10.8 points, 10.6 rebounds, 8.1 assists, 2.0 steals, 1.5 blocks


2018-19

  • Regular season: 7.4 points, 7.3 rebounds, 6.9 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.1 blocks
  • Playoffs: 13.6 points, 9.9 rebounds, 8.2 assists, 1.4 steals, 1.7 blocks


The majority of players get worse in the playoffs when things get harder. It's the opposite for Draymond.

The day before the Warriors completed the sweep of the Trail Blazers in the Western Conference finals, the 2017 Defensive Player of the Year said he views playoff games as "life or death."

Has that mentality always been there?

[RELATEDMcCollum explains why Dubs different are from rest of NBA]

"My third year [the 2014-15 NBA season], when I was a starter, it's been that way since," Draymond told reporters at the time. "That's just the way it feels to me. I remember the first time we won the Finals -- it was like somebody had a clamp on my lungs and I didn't breathe well for seven weeks. And then when we won, it was like, 'Wow. Someone just took the clamp and I could breathe again.'

"That's just how it's felt for me since I've been a starter and playing in the playoffs. And I try to keep that feeling because it means something. And I think it should mean something.

"Leave it all out there and if it don't work out, you can live with that. But I can't live with myself knowing that I didn't leave it all out there when it mattered most."

The Warriors are lucky to have Draymond Green.

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