Warriors

Bob Myers laughs at idea of leaving Warriors for Lakers, and with good reason

Bob Myers laughs at idea of leaving Warriors for Lakers, and with good reason

OAKLAND -- With the three-day dismantling of the Lakers came the speculation and, in some part, concern, among Warriors fans that the team in Los Angeles might come hunting in the Bay Area in hopes of breaking off a piece of the dynasty.

No name was being thrown about more than that of president and general manager Bob Myers. From the moment Magic Johnson stepped down from his position with the Lakers on Tuesday, there has been no shortage of text messages, phone calls and general conversation regarding the possibility of Myers leaving the Warriors for the Lakers.

He went to UCLA and worked out of Los Angeles during his days as an agent, so . . .

Maybe (Warriors CEO) Joe Lacob thinks his son, Kirk, is ready for the job, so . . ..

The Lakers could make an irresistible offer, right?

Which may be why on Myers, standing on the sideline of the practice court as the Warriors prepared for Game 1 against the Clippers on Saturday, needed a couple seconds to catch my drift.

Me: What are you doing here today?

Bob: What do you mean?

Me: Shouldn’t you be having lunch with (Lakers controlling owner) Jeanie Buss?

Bob: Oh, right. Almost forgot. (Looks at his watch) I’m supposed to meet her at 2.

Myers then laughed a laugh that suggests he’s not eager to go anywhere anytime soon, even if there are days and nights when he probably wouldn’t mind.

For one, Lakers GM Rob Pelinka seems overtly secure in his status, practically diving headlong into the power vacuum created by Johnson’s departure and showing coach Luke Walton the door Friday morning.

For two, Myers, who has lived his entire life in either the Bay Area or Southern California, knows whatever headaches that come with his current job would barely register when compared with those felt by the man responsible for the care and feeding of the most beloved sports team in America’s entertainment center.

For three, Lacob may be incredibly driven, sometimes maniacally so, but he surely has come to realize Myers’ value to the emotional stability of the franchise. Lacob doesn’t make questionable decisions to save a dollar or two. Or even a $1 million or more.

As the Warriors have gotten bigger and bolder – and, therefore, requiring of maintenance both routine and emergency – it’s incumbent to have someone like Myers. He has been there to guide both Kevin Durant and Draymond Green through various spasms of turbulence. He has been there when coach Steve Kerr was about to blow and has definitely been there when Lacob was on the verge of detonation.

When DeMarcus Cousins was done with the New Orleans Pelicans, he reached out to Myers. No matter how good the Warriors are, Cousins wouldn’t dare make such move unless he had done his research on Myers and concluded the Warriors GM was approachable and worthy of trust.

Every successful franchise has someone who can go into any office in the building and be as comfortable lending an ear as spreading a word. Someone who can talk one guy down from the ledge and another guy onto a task. And a “cooler,” able to chill the boiling blood of any number of individuals from the front office to the coaching staff to the scouting department and, of course, the men on the roster that have made the Warriors what they have become.

When Draymond Green made the famous comment after the championship parade in 2017 – “Can somebody give Bob Myers some (bleeping) credit?" – he was talking less about roster construction than Myers’ knack for rinsing away the potentially toxic issues that inevitably come when surrounded by so many substantial egos.

Does Myers have detractors? Sure. A few folks look at recent drafts and wonder what’s taking so long to find the next great Warrior.

[RELATED: Kerr reacts to Walton-Lakers split]

Myers also knows there will come a day when the Warriors won’t routinely give the rest of the NBA little more than the backs of their hands. Those close to him seem to believe that’s a challenge he relishes.

That day is not yet upon them. Neither is the day when Myers relocates his family to LA, or anyplace else in the NBA. Lacob is smart enough to know if his GM were to leave, his first priority would be to find another Bob Myers.

Steph Curry donating Breonna Taylor tribute shoes to Black Lives Matter

Steph Curry donating Breonna Taylor tribute shoes to Black Lives Matter

Warriors guard Steph Curry completed his first round of the American Century Championship golf tournament in Lake Tahoe on Friday, and did so while drawing attention to a cause that he doesn't want people to forget about. Towards the toe end of each of his golf shoes were Breonna Taylor's name and likeness.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman and EMT, died in her own home on March 13 after being shot eight times by Louisville police while executing a search warrant. Nearly four entire months have passed since that tragic day and all three officers involved have yet to be arrested, sparking outrage across the country.

Curry's choice of footwear Friday was one of the latest examples in what has been an ongoing chorus of calls for justice. And beyond that, he intends to donate the shoes to Black Lives Matter so that they may be auctioned, with all proceeds going to the organization.

"Obviously, shining a light on Breonna Taylor," Curry explained after completing his round. "Demanding and praying and wishing for justice for her and her family. Anytime you have an opportunity to be on a stage or a platform to raise awareness and continue the conversation going on in our country, I'm all for that. I'll send these to the Black Lives Matter organization and hopefully raise a lot of money for the amazing work that they're doing. 

"We all have roles to play in terms of changing the racial climate in our country, and this is definitely more than just a moment that we're feeling. This is a very small gesture, but hopefully the money goes a long way, and hopefully they continue the conversation of what needs to change all the way around."

[RACE IN AMERICA: Listen to the latest episode]

While the continued search for justice for Taylor and her family clearly is of particular concern for Curry, the donation of his shoes fits in with a wonderful theme of the ACC tournament. Rather than have a purse go to the victor, all winnings will be donated to a number of charities.

Naturally, Curry was more than happy to play for those additional causes.

"Usually there's a purse to play for," Curry said, "but obviously with everything going on, the ability to come up here and play golf and know that -- I don't know what the amount is -- it's all going to worthy causes that will impact lives, and we get to do it by being out here playing golf and being on a stage, it's pretty awesome to be a part of that."

Curry is one of the most popular athletes on the planet, with a platform to match. He understands his role, and continues to do great and important things within it.

How Andrew Wiggins won over Damion Lee, Warriors with quest to improve

How Andrew Wiggins won over Damion Lee, Warriors with quest to improve

The Warriors didn't see a whole lot of Andrew Wiggins, but they saw enough to get excited.

Wiggins, who joined Golden State ahead of February's NBA trade deadline, played just 12 games with the Warriors before the NBA season was suspended in March due to the coronavirus pandemic. He averaged 19.2 points, 4.6 rebounds and 3.4 assists per game in that stretch, winning over his new teammates in the process.

"I love Wiggs," Warriors guard Damion Lee said of Wiggins on this week's episode of the "Runnin' Plays" podcast. "He's quiet and reserved, but even from the point of just playing with him from the first game even until the last game that we had, you can tell that he knows how to play the game and wants to continue to learn more."

[RUNNIN' PLAYS PODCAST: Listen to the latest episode]

The Cleveland Cavaliers drafted Wiggins No. 1 overall in the 2014 NBA Draft, headlining a trade to the Minnesota Timberwolves that brought Kevin Love to Northeast Ohio. Wiggins showed flashes and even signed a max contract that went into effect ahead of the 2018-19 season, but he never consistently put it together in the Twin Cities. The 25-year-old never shot better than 46 percent from the field (or 36 percent from beyond the arc) with the T-Wolves while also struggling on the defensive end.

Wiggins' arrival in the Bay Area was a breath of fresh air, the Warriors said, because of their hole on the wing after signing-and-trading Kevin Durant and outright trading Andre Iguodala last summer. Warriors assistant coach Ron Adams was pleased with Wiggins' defense, and the 1.3 steals per game Wiggins averaged with Golden State before the shutdown would've, if sustained over the course of a full season, been his career high.

The forward's role will look much different next season, as it's difficult to imagine Wiggins averaging 15-plus field-goal attempts per game while playing alongside a healthy Steph Curry and Klay Thompson. Coach Steve Kerr isn't expecting Wiggins to be a star once Curry and Thompson return, and Lee said Wiggins' versatility will allow him to thrive in a reduced role.

"He can shoot it, can make plays, can create," Lee continued. "He had a game where he had 10 assists (against the Denver Nuggets on March 3), I think he had another game where he had 10 rebounds (against the New Orleans Pelicans on Feb. 23). He has it, and obviously once the whole band is back together ... and everyone's healthy, I feel like Wiggs' role will be carved out and he'll be able to excel to the best of his ability."

[RELATED: Five bold predictions for Warriors' important offseason]

Wiggins has had big nights before, but he hasn't sustained them into stardom. His per-game averages with the Warriors this season didn't look all that different from his Timberwolves career (19.7 points, 4.3 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game), but the former No. 1 pick isn't going to carry the same offensive load next season.

The Warriors are counting on that fact bringing out the best in him.