Warriors

Bob Myers laughs at idea of leaving Warriors for Lakers, and with good reason

Bob Myers laughs at idea of leaving Warriors for Lakers, and with good reason

OAKLAND -- With the three-day dismantling of the Lakers came the speculation and, in some part, concern, among Warriors fans that the team in Los Angeles might come hunting in the Bay Area in hopes of breaking off a piece of the dynasty.

No name was being thrown about more than that of president and general manager Bob Myers. From the moment Magic Johnson stepped down from his position with the Lakers on Tuesday, there has been no shortage of text messages, phone calls and general conversation regarding the possibility of Myers leaving the Warriors for the Lakers.

He went to UCLA and worked out of Los Angeles during his days as an agent, so . . .

Maybe (Warriors CEO) Joe Lacob thinks his son, Kirk, is ready for the job, so . . ..

The Lakers could make an irresistible offer, right?

Which may be why on Myers, standing on the sideline of the practice court as the Warriors prepared for Game 1 against the Clippers on Saturday, needed a couple seconds to catch my drift.

Me: What are you doing here today?

Bob: What do you mean?

Me: Shouldn’t you be having lunch with (Lakers controlling owner) Jeanie Buss?

Bob: Oh, right. Almost forgot. (Looks at his watch) I’m supposed to meet her at 2.

Myers then laughed a laugh that suggests he’s not eager to go anywhere anytime soon, even if there are days and nights when he probably wouldn’t mind.

For one, Lakers GM Rob Pelinka seems overtly secure in his status, practically diving headlong into the power vacuum created by Johnson’s departure and showing coach Luke Walton the door Friday morning.

For two, Myers, who has lived his entire life in either the Bay Area or Southern California, knows whatever headaches that come with his current job would barely register when compared with those felt by the man responsible for the care and feeding of the most beloved sports team in America’s entertainment center.

For three, Lacob may be incredibly driven, sometimes maniacally so, but he surely has come to realize Myers’ value to the emotional stability of the franchise. Lacob doesn’t make questionable decisions to save a dollar or two. Or even a $1 million or more.

As the Warriors have gotten bigger and bolder – and, therefore, requiring of maintenance both routine and emergency – it’s incumbent to have someone like Myers. He has been there to guide both Kevin Durant and Draymond Green through various spasms of turbulence. He has been there when coach Steve Kerr was about to blow and has definitely been there when Lacob was on the verge of detonation.

When DeMarcus Cousins was done with the New Orleans Pelicans, he reached out to Myers. No matter how good the Warriors are, Cousins wouldn’t dare make such move unless he had done his research on Myers and concluded the Warriors GM was approachable and worthy of trust.

Every successful franchise has someone who can go into any office in the building and be as comfortable lending an ear as spreading a word. Someone who can talk one guy down from the ledge and another guy onto a task. And a “cooler,” able to chill the boiling blood of any number of individuals from the front office to the coaching staff to the scouting department and, of course, the men on the roster that have made the Warriors what they have become.

When Draymond Green made the famous comment after the championship parade in 2017 – “Can somebody give Bob Myers some (bleeping) credit?" – he was talking less about roster construction than Myers’ knack for rinsing away the potentially toxic issues that inevitably come when surrounded by so many substantial egos.

Does Myers have detractors? Sure. A few folks look at recent drafts and wonder what’s taking so long to find the next great Warrior.

[RELATED: Kerr reacts to Walton-Lakers split]

Myers also knows there will come a day when the Warriors won’t routinely give the rest of the NBA little more than the backs of their hands. Those close to him seem to believe that’s a challenge he relishes.

That day is not yet upon them. Neither is the day when Myers relocates his family to LA, or anyplace else in the NBA. Lacob is smart enough to know if his GM were to leave, his first priority would be to find another Bob Myers.

Warriors takeaways: What we learned in deflating 114-106 loss to Jazz

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USATSI

Warriors takeaways: What we learned in deflating 114-106 loss to Jazz

BOX SCORE

SALT LAKE CITY -- Warriors big man Marquese Chriss said his team was "tired of losing" during his halftime interview with NBC Sports Bay Area's Kerith Burke on Friday at Vivent Smart Home Arena.

Unfortunately for Chriss, the Warriors will have to wait at least two more days to erase their current skid, as Golden State lost 114-106 to the Jazz. 

Unlike most nights, the Warriors -- without Draymond Green and rookie Eric Paschall -- showed fight, taking a seven-point lead after the first quarter. However, a second-half Utah run doomed their chances as the Warriors' inability to finish crippled them once again. 

There are no moral victories in sports and the Warriors will take another loss back to the Bay Area. 

Here are the takeaways as the Warriors fell to 5-22 on the season: 

Fast start erased in one quarter

The Warriors have been immune to quick starts over the last week. On Friday, the trend changed. Through the first 24 minutes, Golden State outscored Utah 26-18 in the paint, while holding the Jazz to just 43 percent from the field. 

Utah's defense was out of sorts in the second quarter, as the Warriors built a 13-point lead. On one possession, Chriss blocked a shot on one end, ran the floor unguarded and received a pass wide open under the basket for an easy dunk. 

Then the third quarter happened.

Over the next 12 minutes the Warriors were outscored 37-28. Even when the Warriors fought back, a key missed dunk from Willie Cauley-Stein ended any hopes of a win. 

The Warriors have shown fight amid injuries, but the only mark of success is winning, a goal the team again couldn't accomplish in Utah. 

Alec Burks shines

Against his former team, Burks was effective, finishing with 24 points including two 3-pointers. Despite shooting just 41 percent from the field this season, Burks has shown the ability to carry Golden State's offense when needed. His downhill attack consistently puts the opponent on edge. 

The location of Burks' output is noteworthy. He spent eight years playing in Utah before injuries derailed his career. His affinity for the town was apparent from the time he walked into the building. Following his pregame workout, he spent most of his time exchanging pleasantries with former teammates and arena staff, causing a Warriors team official to jokingly ask, "When is Alec's statue going up?"

[RELATED: Burks wants to stay with Warriors]

Chriss shined despite scare

The first-year Warrior continued his reclamation bid, finishing with 12 points, adding 13 rebounds and two blocks in 23 minutes off the bench. 

Chriss had a slight scare in the third quarter when he knocked knees with a Jazz player contesting a layup. He was later diagnosed as a left knee contusion. 

Following a rough start to his career, Chriss has become a valuable piece to the transitional Warriors, providing rebounding and scoring off the bench. Friday was yet another example of his contributions.

Warriors' Kevon Looney gives up meat and gluten to combat neuropathy

Warriors' Kevon Looney gives up meat and gluten to combat neuropathy

In the summer of 2017, things clicked for Kevon Looney.

"I had to change my diet," the Warriors' big man revealed in March 2018. "Andre (Iguodala) was in my ear for two years about it. I finally listened to him and it paid off."

After registering career highs in nearly every statistical category last season, Looney was rewarded by the Warriors with a three-year contract worth $15 million.

Unfortunately, his 2019-20 campaign was derailed early in training camp because of a hamstring issue caused by a neuropathic condition he's been dealing with for a couple of years.

It turns out that another dietary change just might save Looney's career again.

As Ryan Gorcey of The Mercury News writes:

After he visited the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., last month, Looney ironed out a recovery plan. He went gluten-free and became a pescatarian (meat-free diets have been shown to help in many neuropathy cases). Kevin (Looney's father) served as Kevon’s personal chef, regularly cooking blackened catfish and baked salmon with vegetables and a side of potatoes.

Hopefully this makes the world of a difference for the 23-year-old.

[RELATEDWhy Dubs might be very active before, after trade deadline]

Since returning on Dec. 2, Looney is averaging just 3.4 points and 2.0 rebounds in 10.1 minutes. He doesn't yet look like the guy Warriors head coach Steve Kerr repeatedly called a "foundational piece" during last year's playoffs.

Perhaps things start to turn around for Looney on Friday night in Utah, as he is starting against the Jazz with Draymond Green and Eric Paschall both sidelined.

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