Warriors

Drake trolled Klay Thompson with 'Hotline Bling' dance after Game 1 technical

Drake trolled Klay Thompson with 'Hotline Bling' dance after Game 1 technical

Drake might not be in the NBA Finals spotlight for a long time but he's certainly going to have a good time while the lights are on.

The Toronto Raptors superfan enjoyed himself Thursday during the Raptors' 118-109 Game 1 win over the Warriors at Scotiabank Arena.  He arrived at the arena in a signed Dell Curry Raptors jersey and got into a small spat with Draymond Green after the final horn sounded.

While the rapper was relatively subdued during Game 1, the antics started to come out as the Warriors began to unravel in the fourth quarter. 

When Klay Thompson was hit with a technical foul after being called for an offensive foul on Danny Green, Drake turned on his troll game, hitting Klay with the dance from "Hotline Bling."

Savage.

Prior to Game 1, Thompson said he wouldn't be listening to Drake's "soft R&B songs" like "Hotline Bling."

Hey, talk used to be cheap but nowadays it's free, right?

[RELATED: Draymond rocks Drake gear in Toronto after Game 1 spat]

The Warriors will need to rebound in Sunday's Game 2 or else they'll head back to Oakland facing a two-games-to-none series hole. While Kevin Durant's return is expected midway through the series, it will be hard to win four out of five games against a talented Raptors team. 

Drake and Toronto are on a mission, just trying to fight to the finish.

OK, I'm done now.

Warriors broadcaster Jim Barnett describes racism Bill Russell faced

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AP

Warriors broadcaster Jim Barnett describes racism Bill Russell faced

Warriors color commentator Jim Barnett has seen a lot during his time following the NBA, but perhaps what sticks out most were his experiences with Boston Celtics legend Bill Russell and the racism the Hall of Famer had to endure. 

During an appearance on the "Runnin' Plays" podcast, Barnett -- who was drafted and played one season in Boston -- shared a story about the time Russell was given a key to the city just before a game the Celtics played in a Southern state.

Following the game, the black players on the team were denied entry into a hotel because of the color of their skin. In response, Russell returned the key to the town's mayor. 

The scenario was just one of many for the prominently black Celtics of the 1960s, according to Barnett. 

"They didn't sell out in the Boston Garden," Barnett said on the first episode of "Runnin' Plays". "They sold out in the Boston Garden for the hockey team - the Boston Bruins - every game was sold out. But not the Boston Celtics. It was a racist town."  

The face of the team was Russell, who became a civil rights leader in his own right. In 1961, he staged a boycott of a game in Lexington, Ky. after a city restaurant wouldn't serve his black teammates. In 1966, he became the first black coach in the history of professional sports.

By 1967, he -- along with basketball great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown -- led a summit to support boxer Muhammad Ali after he refused to fight in the Vietnam War.  

However, the climate of the time affected how Russell interacted with fans. 

"I remember one time, this businessman asked for an autograph," Barnett said. "He said, 'if I weren't Bill Russell of the Boston Celtics, I'd be just another N-word to him.' 

Barnett added that the NBA capped how many non-whites could be on an active roster. 

"There was a quota," Barnett said. "You couldn't have more than two or three blacks. I know that for a fact." 

[RELATED: Bowman has been Warriors' bright spot, looks like a keeper]

As for his interactions with Russell and his black teammates, Barnett -- a white man -- said he didn't have any quandaries working alongside his teammates. 

"We didn't have any problems," the guys I played with and against, they were there to make a living in the NBA just like I was and we were all the same."

How seven former Warriors are playing for their new teams this season

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AP

How seven former Warriors are playing for their new teams this season

Following a complete roster overhaul and an absurd amount of injuries, the 2019-20 Warriors hardly are recognizable compared to the past few years.

The only remaining players on the roster from a team that went to the NBA Finals last season are Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Kevon Looney, Jacob Evans III and Damion Lee. Of the players that had moved on from the Warriors from last season, many of them have not seen any basketball action for various reasons.

That list includes Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston and DeMarcus Cousins. Let's check in on the former Warriors who are currently playing basketball:

Quinn Cook: 14.6 mpg, 5.2 ppg, 41% FG, 32% 3FG, 1.8 apg

Cook moved on to the Los Angeles Lakers, as part of an improved bench to support the star-studded squad. So far in this young season, Cook has struggled to find consistency. After averaging 21 minutes per game in October, his playing time has fallen considerably to about 12 minutes in November.

Excluding two games where he combined to go 5-for-8 from long distance, Cook has struggled to find his shooting stroke from deep, making only four of his 20 3-point shots in all the other games combined. As Warriors fans know, Cook can be streaky at times, so more likely than not, he will grow accustomed to his new team and end up contributing primarily with his normally efficient shot.

Alfonzo McKinnie: 10.4 mpg, 3 ppg, 41% FG, 50% 3FG, 2.1 rpg

Zo was a late-cut for the Warriors once the team needed to find a roster spot for Marquese Chriss, and he quickly was scooped up on waivers by the Cleveland Cavaliers. The small forward started the season completely out of the rotation, but has since seen his role grow considerably.

A couple games ago, McKinnie played 30 minutes and scored 14 points while going 3-for-6 from deep. Last season with the Warriors, McKinnie started red-hot out the gate, and then injuries and inefficient shooting derailed his overall play as the year went along.

He will try to improve on his consistency in a growing role with the Cavs.

Jordan Bell: 8.3 mpg, 4 ppg, 53% FG, 3.7 rpg

Bell only has played six games so far this season as he has dealt with injuries throughout training camp and into the first weeks of the season. His minutes mostly have come in garbage time situations for the Timberwolves, but he has performed well in his limited playing time.

It will be hard for him to crack the rotation for a team that has a solid frontcourt, but Bell has the potential to be an electrifying bench piece if given the right set of circumstances.

Damian Jones: 16.9 mpg, 6.2 ppg, 66% FG, 3.6 rpg, .8 bpg

Out of all the bench pieces that currently are playing, the Warriors might miss Jones the most to start the season. In five of the 13 games he has played, Jones has shown off his normal athletic, bouncy talents for the Hawks. He even has hit two of four shots from 3-point range this season.

In November, he is averaging nearly 20 minutes per game and his playing time is rising. The Warriors also are happy with Omari Spellman, whom they acquired for Jones, and it seems like it has been a win-win trade for each team.

Marcus Derrickson: (G League) 26.6 mpg, 15 ppg, 45% FG, 33% 3FG, 6.3 rpg

The former Warriors two-way player has played four games for the College Park Skyhawks of the NBA G League. The 6-foot-7 power forward out of Georgetown will try to earn his way back to the NBA, and will have to do so by being a small stretch-four that can hit shots from deep consistently.

Jonas Jerebko: (EuroLeague) 19 mpg, 8.9 ppg, 50% FG, 36% 3FG, 3.3 rpg

After playing so well to start the season for the Warriors, Jerebko's game fell off considerably in the second half. After not receiving any NBA offers of his liking, Jerebko instead went overseas to Moscow and now plays for Khimki of the EuroLeague. 

[RELATED: Barnes details 'We Believe' Dubs' party after upsetting Mavs]

Andrew Bogut: (NBL Australia) 22.8 mpg, 7.9 ppg, 52% FG, 10.2 rpg, 1.2 bpg

Bogut returned to the NBA to help a depleted Warriors team compete in the playoffs last season after playing 28 games for the Sydney Kings in Australia. He returned back to his homeland to play for the Kings this season, and will have the option once their season is done to get picked up by an NBA team yet again.

With the Warriors in a rebuilding year, it is highly unlikely there will be a reunion this season.