Warriors

Draymond Green lost 23 pounds for Warriors' playoff run at Bob Myers' behest

Draymond Green lost 23 pounds for Warriors' playoff run at Bob Myers' behest

Draymond Green scored 17 points in Game 1 of the Warriors' first-round NBA playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers.

It should come as no surprise that Green is playing better now that the playoffs are here. After all, he did drop 23 pounds just for the occasion.

Yes, you read that right.

With Green struggling mightily through the first half of the season, Warriors general manager Bob Myers went to the forward after the All-Star break to suggest he try and slim down.

“Draymond,” Myers said then, via The Athletic's Marcus Thompson. “I’mma tell you something you may not want to hear.”

Green was ready.

“All right. I’m listening,” Green said.

“If we’re going to win a championship,” Myers said, “you’ve got to get in shape.”

While Myers prepared for his mercurial forward to explode, Green knew that's what he had to do. In fact, he already had a plan in place.

"Yeah, I start this strenuous regimen on March 6,” Green said. “It’ll take me like two weeks, maybe like 10 days, to really get to where I need to be.”

It worked as Green dropped 23 pounds over six weeks thanks to a strict diet and intense strength training regimen. He has seen his game rise as a result.

Over the final 17 regular-season games, Green held opponents to 37.2 percent shooting and has ramped it up in the playoffs, holding the Clippers to 36.6 percent when he's the primary defender. 

[RELATED: Draymond Green rediscovers shooting touch in Game 1]

Also of importance is Green's overall health. The forward battled knee, ankle and toe injuries throughout the early part of the season, but he finally is healthy and in peak shape. 

Of course, Green's improved play is even more paramount after DeMarcus Cousins' injury in Game 2.

With the center expected to miss the remainder of the playoffs, Green's presence on both ends of the floor will be all the more important if the Warriors are to win their third straight NBA title.

Warriors GM Bob Myers explains tricky part about Kevin Durant's injury

Warriors GM Bob Myers explains tricky part about Kevin Durant's injury

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Warriors forward Kevin Durant sustained a strained right calf on May 8.

The injury is more serious than initially thought, as Golden State made the following announcement on Thursday morning:

"Durant, who has not yet been cleared to begin on-court activities, continues to make good progress with his rehabilitation. At this point, it is unlikely that he will play at the beginning of the 2019 NBA Finals, but it's hopeful that he could return at some point during the series."

Game 1 of the NBA Finals is on Thursday, May 30 in either Milwaukee or Toronto, and the Warriors will provide another update on KD next Wednesday.

"The tricky thing with Kevin is you cannot have a setback because we're so up against it," Dubs GM Bob Myers said on 95.7 The Game on Thursday afternoon. "This is not something you can push hard because if you have a setback, it kind of takes you out of the equation.

"So you have to be very diligent and smart. And Rick Celebrini (Director of Sports Medicine and Performance) is great and Kevin has been unbelievable in showing up twice a day and putting all the work in that he can. You don't need to motivate Kevin Durant to want to get back."

The reigning two-time NBA Finals MVP did not travel to Portland for Games 3 and 4 of the Western Conference finals. Is it possible that he stays back in the Bay Area next week as well?

[RELATEDCurry named All-NBA First Team, Durant makes Second Team]

"I haven't gotten to that place yet," Myers said. "I'm speculating that at this point we're assuming he will travel ... that hasn't even really been kicked around. I think all indications are that he would go and play or continue to rehab there.

"But we haven't finalized that."

Game 2 is on Sunday, June 2 with Games 3 and 4 at Oracle Arena on June 5 and 7 respectively.

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Why Steve Kerr deserves a lot more credit than he has been given

Why Steve Kerr deserves a lot more credit than he has been given

Editor's note: Grant Liffmann (@grantliffmann) is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders, which airs on NBC Sports Bay Area 90 minutes before each home game and 60 minutes after every game. Each week, Grant will drop his Outsider Observation on the state of the Dubs.

So far this postseason, the Warriors storylines have read that the team has won on the backs of Kevin Durant's early explosion, Steph Curry and Draymond Green's brilliance when Durant went down, the defensive masterpieces of Andre Iguodala and Klay Thompson, and the unexpected rise of a much-maligned bench. But now it is time to give Steve Kerr some credit. 

You could argue that this postseason has been Kerr's most impressive coaching job yet. After dealing with his most dramatic and tumultuous regular season since taking over the team, Kerr was forced to rethink the Warriors strategy after they were dealt a blow very early in the playoffs with the loss of DeMarcus Cousins. Turning back the clock to what made the Warriors so successful before Cousins arrived was not overly challenging, but dealing with the loss of Durant amidst a series against one of the toughest opponents the Warriors have faced in Houston could have been catastrophic.  The bench had been under-performing throughout the playoffs and had to rely upon all of the sudden. This is exactly where Kerr's coaching shined. 

Often the biggest criticism of Kerr's coaching style is his insistence on getting the ball into the hands of every player on the roster, sometimes at the expense of production from the stars. He had been a role-player for most of his career, knowing full well how important it is for all players to feel involved and important. The insistence paid off in a time of need. The depth of the team was comfortable and ready when called upon. Throughout the season they had been used in stressful situations, much to the chagrin of couch coaches. Kerr pushed all the right buttons, leading the team to a six-game winning streak since Durant went down. 

Just the other day, Paul Pierce on ESPN was saying that he considered Kerr a top-five coach of all-time. While I do believe it is too early to make such a declaration, considering this is only Kerr's fifth season as a head coach, I do think it is reasonable to say he is on the path to that recognition. The big picture look at Kerr's career is historically impressive.

The Warriors have made the finals in five consecutive seasons since Kerr became the Head Coach. That in itself can tell the whole story. But now add in that the Warriors have a 78.5 winning percentage in the regular season under Kerr, and even more incredibly, a 75.7 percentage in the postseason. The team has lost one playoff series in five years under Kerr (albeit a pretty big one). The push back that Pierce received, and many others give, when deciding Kerr's greatness in history seems to always point to the notion that he inherited a team with Hall of Fame talent, and that any good coach could make them champions. This notion is simply naive.

When Kerr took over the Warriors, they were on the path to being a great team. Steph Curry and Klay Thompson had become household names, but nowhere near their current star power. Andre Iguodala was no longer the star he once was in his Sixers years, and David Lee, alongside Andrew Bogut and a young Harrison Barnes were the other most notable Warriors. The team had made some noise in the playoffs but were not ready to be a real contender. Once Kerr became head coach, it all changed. Curry and Thompson had their skills fully realized under Kerr's strategy and leadership, and Draymond Green emerged as a force to be reckoned with.

The Warriors immediately jumped from a good team to a historic team, revolutionizing the game to what the NBA looks like today across the league. Sure, Steve Kerr inherited the parts, but he assembled the pieces into something invaluable. Let's also not forget that Phil Jackson, Pat Riley, Greg Popovich and other all-time great coaches inherited and developed talent like Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan, etc. 

Since taking over, Kerr's system has become ingrained into the way Curry, Klay, Draymond, and Iguodala play the game. When Luke Walton and Mike Brown manned the ship during the stints in which Kerr dealt with a debilitating back injury, the team rolled along through Kerr's already adopted strategy and infrastructure. It is not a detractor against Kerr that his assistant coaches were able to maintain the incredible success of the team while he was out, in fact, it should further his great reputation. The best leader creates a system that can survive and run seamlessly through the subjects he or she enables, with or without constant guidance.

And he did exactly that.  

[RELATED: Curry named All-NBA First Team, KD makes Second Team]

Bringing in Durant to the Warriors was not only a credit to the character of the team's top stars and their unselfish motivations but also the welcoming and fun environment created by Steve Kerr and the front office. Players wanted to come to Oakland to win and to truly enjoy themselves while doing it. The Warriors did not have that same glow before Kerr. While the Warriors stars are well-known for their unselfishness, it would be ignorant to assume that Kerr has not had to manage ego's and confrontational, fiery personalities. And he has managed them to three, possibly four titles.

It is yet to be seen how the Warriors will fare in the Finals and what the team will look like next season. But with Steve Kerr in command, they are in historically good hands.