Warriors

Draymond Green sports wrist wrap after Warriors' Game 4 win, insists he's fine

Draymond Green sports wrist wrap after Warriors' Game 4 win, insists he's fine

Draymond Green was all over the place in Game 4.

The Warriors forward finished with 10 points, nine rebounds, five assists and two blocks in Golden State's 113-105 win over the LA Clippers on Sunday. He also came away with a brace on his right hand, though he told NBC Sports Bay Area's Logan Murdock that he's fine.

No word on what the injury is, but Green has two days to receive treatment before the Warriors and Clippers meet Wednesday night in Game 5. Golden State would claim the best-of-seven NBA playoff series with a win in Oakland.

"You gotta know that they are going to come out and play hard, " Green told NBC Sports Bay Area's Kerith Burke after the game. "This is a team, their backs have been against the wall all year, and they put their head down and continued to work. So, we got to come out and withstand that first punch, and if we withstand that, we'll put ourselves in a good position."

Doc Rivers describes what makes Warriors' best play so tough to guard

Doc Rivers describes what makes Warriors' best play so tough to guard

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

In Steph Curry and Draymond Green, the Golden State Warriors possess one of the best pick-and-roll combinations in the history of the NBA.

That is not hyperbole.

Head coach Steve Kerr has repeatedly said that the Dubs could run a pick-and-roll every play with Curry and get incredible results. 

But he wants a lot of ball and player movement because he believes it's better in the long run if everybody is involved on the offensive end.

Therefore, the Dubs constantly cut and pass and screen and don't let the defense stand still. They still get incredible/historic results.

And there is one play in particular that is a nightmare for the opposition.

Usually, it's Kevin Durant with the ball and Draymond Green setting the screen for Curry. But with KD out for the Western Conference finals, it was Draymond passing and Looney screening.

Enes Kanter (first clip) and Zach Collins (second clip) are stuck in no-man's land as they ignore Looney and end up getting burned.

"It is their single best play and the hardest one to guard," Clippers head coach Doc Rivers told ESPN's Zach Lowe recently. "You have to recognize the guy you are not guarding on purpose is now setting a screen, and run back up, and that is really hard.

"You cannot get paralyzed."

But defenders do get paralyzed all the time.

[RELATEDMcCollum explains why Dubs different are from rest of NBA]

"They cause a lot of confusion," Blazers big man Meyers Leonard told ESPN. "It's incredibly difficult to be a help defender and then be up at the screen. It feels awkward.

"Help defense against the Warriors is totally different when they are playing that old Warriors style. It's not normal. You never know what's coming."

Just the way Kerr likes it...

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Blazers' CJ McCollum describes what separates Warriors from everybody

Blazers' CJ McCollum describes what separates Warriors from everybody

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

The Golden State Warriors swept the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference finals.

The Dubs also ended Portland's season in 2016 and 2017.

Blazers guard CJ McCollum clearly knows what it's like to face the team that will be playing in its fifth straight NBA Finals.

"The biggest difference you see with the Warriors compared to everybody else is how aligned they are," McCollum said on his podcast, Pull Up. "Obviously, they've had some issues off the court this season. But once they step on that court, the communication is there. The understanding of where everyone is supposed to be is there consistently.

"You don't ever really see them have crazy lapses. Offensively, constant movement off the ball and everyone is always looking to get Steph open; always looking to screen for Klay. And when they're open, the ball is delivered on time and on target consistently."

Steph Curry's numbers were incredible in the sweep: 36.5 points, 8.3 rebounds, 7.3 assists, 47 percent shooting from the field, 42.6 percent from deep.

Klay Thompson averaged 21.5 points, but shot below 38 percent from the field and 34.4 percent from beyond the arc.

Fortunately for the Warriors, they also have that Draymond Green guy. The three-time NBA All-Star averaged 16.5 points, 11.8 rebounds, 8.8 assists, 2.8 blocks and 2.3 steals, while shooting over 54 percent.

That's just nuts.

"What makes them so good is Draymond's ability to make decisions in the pick-and-roll," McCollum said. "He did a great job of pushing the tempo and pushing the pace off makes and misses. He initiated the offense and historically has made the right decision on when to finish around the basket, when to kick it out for a 3 or throw the lob.

"Steph is Steph and Klay is Klay, and KD and the rest of those players. But he's a very unique asset. His defensive presence -- being able to guard five guys. He can guard pick-and-rolls, he can guard in the post. He's the ultimate help defender.

"I think he makes their team go."

[RELATEDDraymond calls no LeBron in playoffs 'kind of a mindf--k']

There's a reason head coach Steve Kerr has been calling Draymond the "heartbeat" of the Warriors for years.

Follow @DrewShiller on Twitter and Instagram