Warriors

How Jonas Jerebko came out of hibernation, helped spark Warriors' win

How Jonas Jerebko came out of hibernation, helped spark Warriors' win

After spending much of the past three months in hoops hibernation, Jonas Jerebko resurfaced Tuesday night and reminded the Warriors why they hired him last summer.

The 6-foot-10 forward came off the bench in the second quarter and stunned not only the Minnesota Timberwolves but also the Warriors by lighting up the scoreboard at a level usually reserved for the likes of Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson.

Jerebko took three 3-pointers and made them all. His 4-of-6 shooting from the field and 3-of-3 shooting from the free-throw line translated to 14 points in nine minutes.

Who was that guy?

“I haven’t played him much at all, and the guys were taking a lot of joy from Jonas’ performance,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr told reporters after a 117-107 win at Target Center. “He’s just a pro. He comes out there and hasn’t played in about a month and stays ready and does that. That’s why he is who he is.”

Jerebko scored 18 points in 18 minutes -- the first time he hit double figures since Dec. 22, when he rang up a season-high 23 points in a win over the Dallas Mavericks. For someone who hadn’t seen much action, Jerebko's timing and rhythm was flawless.

The Warriors signed Jerebko in hopes of getting some offense off the bench. To be specific, they identified the veteran power forward as someone capable of stretching the floor, making life easier for his teammates.

And for a while, they were getting what they wanted, with Jerebko drilling 37 3-pointers in his first two months as a Warrior.

But he made just 18 triples over the next three months. His shot deserted him, his minutes vanished and he became a cheerleader.

The roles were reversed Tuesday. His teammates were enjoying the Jerebko Show.

“If he knocks down those shots and keeps shooting them with confidence, he builds off that,” Kevin Durant said. “He made his first few. And then he got going. He’s driving to the rim, he’s shooting hook shots. You knock a few shots down, then your confidence is through the roof.”

Jerebko kept busy by putting in work. There were times when he wondered where he fit, if he still fit and whether he’d have another chance. He only knew that if the opportunity came, he would have to produce.

“Stay in the gym,” he said. “Get early to practice, get shots up and work on your conditioning and always stay ready. Control what you can control.

“It helps when you’ve been in the situation before, which I have. I’m confident in my abilities, so like I said, I’ve just got to stay ready and help the team out whenever they need it. That’s all I can do, and tonight was a good night.”

With 12 games remaining in the regular season, the coaching staff is assessing the roster, evaluating individuals and pondering matchups for the playoffs. They believe there will be games when Jerebko can make an impact.

If his shot is falling as it did Tuesday, that would apply to any game and any opponent.

“He fits their system well, and he can shoot the ball well,” Timberwolves coach Ryan Saunders said. “If you allow him to be comfortable, he’s a difference maker for that team.”

[RELATED: Steph reaches 300 3-pointers in a season for third time]

Not every defense will allow him or anybody else the privilege of comfort. Jerebko knows that. The Warriors know that.

They only hope one comfortable night can lead to a few more in the coming weeks.

Why Mychal Thompson was nervous for Klay's first game vs. Kobe Bryant

Why Mychal Thompson was nervous for Klay's first game vs. Kobe Bryant

Klay Thompson is just about the most cool, calm, collected player in the NBA. He never gets rattled and he's never nervous.

But Klay's dad Mychal is a different story.

The elder Thompson posted a photo on Twitter on Monday from Klay's very first game against Los Angeles Lakers legend Kobe Bryant, and he revealed that he was nervous to watch his son face his idol.

Mychal said he was nervous because of the way Kobe treated rookies he faced. In that game, on Jan. 6, 2012, Bryant 39 points, seven assists and four rebounds in the Lakers' 97-90 win over the Warriors.

[RUNNIN' PLAYS PODCAST: Listen to the latest episode]

Klay, in just his seventh career game, scored 14 points off the bench.

Born in Los Angeles, Klay grew up worshipping the late Bryant. Just this week, the Warriors star stopped by Staples Center to pay his respects to Bryant and his daughter Gigi, who died in a helicopter crash on Jan. 26.

[RELATED: Steph had "major FOMO" when NBA bubble games began]

Based on the photo of Klay guarding Kobe eight years ago, it doesn't look like the 2011 No. 11 overall draft pick was nervous at all.

Steph Curry says NBA players upsetting President Trump doing 'right thing'

Steph Curry says NBA players upsetting President Trump doing 'right thing'

Steph Curry isn't able to peacefully protest in Orlando, Fla., but he's proud of what his NBA peers are doing with their platform.

Throughout the NBA restart at the ESPN Wide World of Sports complex, entire teams have taken a knee during the playing of the national anthem to protest racial and social injustices. Players are wearing social justice messages on their uniforms. They are using their Zoom conference calls with reporters to call for equality and for the Louisville police officers who shot Breonna Taylor to be arrested.

In particular, United States President Donald Trump has taken exception to NBA players kneeling during the national anthem, stating that he's turning off games because of the action.

But Curry believes if NBA players are angering President Trump, their message is the right one.

“My barometer is always, if the current president is upset about something that somebody’s speaking out on, then you’re probably saying the right thing," Curry told The New York Times' Marc Stein on Monday. "Whether they’ve knelt, or sacrificed an interview to talk about Breonna Taylor, or whatever’s important, they’re talking about it and they’re backing it up with action.”

Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James spoke to reporters last week about President Trump turning off NBA games because players are kneeling.

"I really don't think the basketball community are sad about losing his viewership, him viewing the game," James said last Wednesday. "And that's all I got to say."

[RELATED: Seth Curry believes missing NBA restart tough for Steph]

Curry, LeBron and the rest of the NBA community understand what they are trying to accomplish with their actions and words. They are making a push for justice and equality in society. They are not concerned with President Trump's opposition.

And as Curry indicated, if the current president opposed what they are doing, they should keep doing what they are doing.