Warriors

How Steve Kerr's views were shaped by his father's murder, family talks

How Steve Kerr's views were shaped by his father's murder, family talks

Some people might wonder why an NBA coach even cares about world politics. For Steve Kerr, it’s simple: He grew up with it.

Kerr was born in Lebanon and spent the majority of his childhood in the Middle East. His entire life changed on Jan. 18, 1984, though, when his father, Malcolm, was murdered by extremists in Beirut.

The Warriors coach recently shared with NBC Sports Bay Area’s Monte Poole in an exclusive interview how his father helped shape his world view.

“Before my dad was killed, I remember night after night I’d get home, and he’d be typing on his typewriter, using the White-Out when he would make a mistake,” Kerr said of his dad, who was president of American University of Beirut at the time of his murder. “He’d have popcorn next to him. He was in his study listening to music and working. And then at 6 o’clock, the MacNeil-Lehrer Report would come on the TV, and my mom and dad would watch the world news and whatever was going on.

“And then at the dinner table, everything was being discussed, from world politics to -- I’d prefer to talk about the NBA, but that didn’t come up very often. I was pretty much silent, just sort of taking it all in. But I was exposed to all of that at a young age.

“When my dad died, I was 18. I was still, relatively, a kid, just beginning to grow up. And it shaped the way I thought about the world. It disillusioned me in many ways. And everything that’s happened since, I’ve always had the big-picture, global perspective in mind.”

In Part 2 of “Steve Kerr: Not Sticking To Sports,” the coach also discusses how America views itself in the world lens and why he believes Donald Trump was elected president two years ago.

The interview, which will run in five installments, only can be viewed on the MyTeams by NBC Sports app, which can be downloaded for iOS and Android.

Six under-radar free agents Warriors could pursue signing in offseason

Six under-radar free agents Warriors could pursue signing in offseason

The Warriors need to shore up their depth at key positions if they intend to make a run at the NBA title next season.

If Steph Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green are healthy next season, the front office will have to mix and match with what they already have filling out the roster, bringing in new additions with limited money to spend.The Warriors will only have the taxpayer mid-level exception and minimum contracts at their disposal to hand out to unrestricted free agents.

We already examined the guards, wings and big men who clearly could interest the Warriors. But what about the free agents who might not immediately catch your eye?

With limited salary-cap room at their disposal, perhaps those are the exact type of players the Warriors should pursue.

CLICK HERE FOR SIX UNDER-THE-RADAR WARRIORS' FREE-AGENT TARGETS

NBA rumors: Warriors wouldn't have let Steph Curry play in Orlando

NBA rumors: Warriors wouldn't have let Steph Curry play in Orlando

The NBA reportedly is considering creating a second "bubble" in Chicago for the eight teams that were not included in the Orlando bubble as part of the league's expanded playoff format. Warriors general manager Bob Myers said Thursday that Golden State potentially would participate, despite coach Steve Kerr previously insisting that the Dubs would not be interested in such a setup.

It remains to be seen if the second bubble actually will take place, but even if it does, it sure seems like you won't be seeing Steph Curry play in it. ESPN's Jackie MacMullan reported he wouldn't have played in Orlando had the Warriors qualified, and it begs the question as to why Chicago would be any different.

"I was told unequivocally by people at Golden State," MacMullan said Thursday on the "Hoop Collective" podcast, "if Golden State came back (to play in Orlando) they weren't gonna let Steph Curry step foot on the floor."

"The reason they were worried about Steph Curry," MacMullan added, "was because they didn't feel that he had played enough to come back."

So, there you have it. The Warriors arguably would have very little to gain from participating in the Chicago bubble, and given that there is no championship at stake -- like there is in Orlando -- Golden State doesn't have much motivation to send its star veteran players, especially those that are returning from injury.

Curry played in precisely one of the Warriors' final 61 games before the season was paused due to the coronavirus pandemic after returning from a broken wrist. And if he isn't going to play, you can bet Klay Thompson -- who would be returning from a torn ACL -- won't either.

[RELATED: Stephen A believes Warriors will return to title contention]

Draymond Green previously said that he would have played in Orlando, but if the Splash Brothers are out, why would Golden State risk the health of the other remaining piece of its championship core?

The Warriors need to find a way to stay in basketball shape and continue developing chemistry over what is going to be an extremely long layoff before the start of next season. But if Curry, Thompson and Green aren't involved, then that kind of ruins the whole point.

[RUNNIN' PLAYS PODCAST: Listen to the latest episode]