Warriors

Instant Replay: Warriors lose back-to-back for first time since April '15

Instant Replay: Warriors lose back-to-back for first time since April '15

BOX SCORE

On a night when Steve Kerr was firing clipboards, Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson were misfiring 3-pointers and the Warriors, as a team, were showing only glimpses of fire, it added up to the end of a beloved streak.

A 94-87 loss to the Bulls on Thursday night ended at 146, the number of consecutive games the Warriors had gone without back-to-back defeats.

The Warriors (50-11) last lost back-to-back games on April 5 and April 7 in 2015.

Curry scored 23 points to lead the Warriors, but missed 17 of his 27 shots and nine of his 11 3-pointers. He made two from deep, enough to surpass Kobe Bryant on the all-time list of triples.

Thompson had a tougher night at United Center, scoring 13 points on 5-of-22 shooting, including 1-of-11 beyond the arc.

Draymond Green (12 points), Pat McCaw (11) and Andre Iguodala (10) rounded out the scoring leaders for the Warriors (50-11). McCaw started at small forward for the injured Kevin Durant.

Jimmy Butler scored 22 points to lead the Bulls (31-30), who won for the fifth time in six games.

STANDOUT PERFORMER

Though his numbers were not spectacular, no one performed as needed better than backup big man David West.

West’s line: Two points (1-of-5 shooting), five rebounds, five assists and one block. He played 16 minutes and finished plus-5. He was one of three Warriors to finish in the plus category.

TURNING POINT

After the Warriors pulled ahead 85-84 on a layup by West with 5:43 remaining, they went stone cold -- 1-of-11 from the field -- over the remainder of the game as the Bulls closed it out with a 10-2 run.

INJURY UPDATE

Warriors: F Kevin Durant (L knee sprain, tibial bone bruise) was listed as out. C Damian Jones is on assignment with Santa Cruz of the NBA Development League.

Bulls: G Michael Carter-Williams (L patellar tendinitis) and F Paul Zipser (L ankle tendinitis) were listed as questionable. Zipser was upgraded to active prior to tipoff.

WHAT’S NEXT

The Warriors return to action Sunday afternoon in New York, where they will face the Knicks at Madison Square Garden. Tipoff is scheduled for 12:35 p.m. Pacific.

Warriors guard Shaun Livingston questionable vs. Thunder in NBA season opener

Warriors guard Shaun Livingston questionable vs. Thunder in NBA season opener

Warriors point guard Shaun Livingston did not practice for the second straight day on Monday. Livingston is dealing with right foot soreness, and is questionable for Golden State's season opener against the Oklahoma City Thunder on Tuesday, the team announced on Monday. 

Meanwhile, point guard Stephen Curry and forward Draymond Green were not listed on the injury report. Curry skipped Sunday's practice to rehab some "minor ailments," according to Warriors head coach Steve Kerr. Green played in just his second game of the preseason on Friday, after missing a couple weeks with soreness in his right knee. Kerr told reporters on Monday that Green will not have a minutes restriction in the season opener, but that the Warriors are still looking to ease him back into the lineup. 

The Thunder could also be shorthanded themselves. Oklahoma City listed guards Russell Westbrook (right knee scope) and Andre Roberson (left patellar tendon surgery) as out for Tuesday, while center Steven Adams (lower back stiffness) is questionable. 

Trail Blazers, Seahawks owner Paul Allen dies at 65

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USATSI

Trail Blazers, Seahawks owner Paul Allen dies at 65

SEATTLE  — Paul G. Allen, who co-founded Microsoft with his childhood friend Bill Gates before becoming a billionaire philanthropist who invested in conservation, space travel and professional sports, died Monday. He was 65.

His death was announced by his company, Vulcan Inc.

Earlier this month Allen announced that the non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that he was treated for in 2009 had returned and he planned to fight it aggressively.

“While most knew Paul Allen as a technologist and philanthropist, for us he was a much-loved brother and uncle, and an exceptional friend,” said his sister, Jody Allen, in a statement.

Allen, who was an avid sports fan, owned the Portland Trail Blazers and the Seattle Seahawks.

Allen and Gates met while attending a private school in north Seattle. The two friends would later drop out of college to pursue the future they envisioned: A world with a computer in every home.

Gates so strongly believed it that he left Harvard University in his junior year to devote himself full-time to his and Allen’s startup, originally called Micro-Soft. Allen spent two years at Washington State University before dropping out as well.

They founded the company in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and their first product was a computer language for the Altair hobby-kit personal computer, giving hobbyists a basic way to program and operate the machine.

After Gates and Allen found some success selling their programming language, MS-Basic, the Seattle natives moved their business in 1979 to Bellevue, Washington, not far from its eventual home in Redmond.

Microsoft’s big break came in 1980, when IBM Corp. decided to move into personal computers and asked Microsoft to provide the operating system.

Gates and company didn’t invent the operating system. To meet IBM’s needs, they spent $50,000 to buy one known as QDOS from another programmer, Tim Paterson. Eventually the product, refined by Microsoft — and renamed DOS, for Disk Operating System — became the core of IBM PCs and their clones, catapulting Microsoft into its dominant position in the PC industry.

The first versions of two classic Microsoft products, Microsoft Word and the Windows operating system, were released in 1983. By 1991, Microsoft’s operating systems were used by 93 percent of the world’s personal computers.

The Windows operating system is now used on most of the world’s desktop computers, and Word is the cornerstone of the company’s prevalent Office products.

Microsoft was thrust onto the throne of technology and soon Gates and Allen became billionaires.

With his sister Jody Allen in 1986, he founded Vulcan, the investment firm that oversees his business and philanthropic efforts. He founded the Allen Institute for Brain Science and the aerospace firm Stratolaunch, which has built a colossal airplane designed to launch satellites into orbit. He has also backed research into nuclear-fusion power.

Allen later joined the list of America’s wealthiest people who pledged to give away the bulk of their fortunes to charity. In 2010, he publicly pledged to give away the majority of his fortune, saying he believed “those fortunate to achieve great wealth should put it to work for the good of humanity.”

When he released his 2011 memoir, “Idea Man,” he allowed 60 Minutes inside his home on Lake Washington, across the water from Seattle, revealing collections that ranged from the guitar Jimi Hendrix played at Woodstock to vintage war planes and a 300-foot yacht with its own submarine.

Allen served as Microsoft’s executive vice president of research and new product development until 1983, when he resigned after being diagnosed with cancer.

“To be 30 years old and have that kind of shock — to face your mortality — really makes you feel like you should do some of the things that you haven’t done yet,” Allen said in a 2000 book, “Inside Out: Microsoft in Our Own Words,” published to celebrate 25 years of Microsoft.

His influence is firmly imprinted on the cultural landscape of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, from the bright metallic Museum of Pop Culture designed by architect Frank Gehry to the computer science center at the University of Washington that bears his name.

In 1988 at the age of 35, he bought the Portland Trail Blazers professional basketball team. He told The Associated Press that “for a true fan of the game, this is a dream come true.”

“Paul Allen was the ultimate trail blazer – in business, philanthropy and in sports.  As one of the longest-tenured owners in the NBA, Paul brought a sense of discovery and vision to every league matter large and small," NBA commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement. "He was generous with his time on committee work, and his expertise helped lay the foundation for the league’s growth internationally and our embrace of new technologies.  He was a valued voice who challenged assumptions and conventional wisdom and one we will deeply miss as we start a new season without him."

Allen also was a part owner of the Seattle Sounders FC, a major league soccer team, and bought the Seattle Seahawks. Allen could sometimes be seen at games or chatting in the locker room with players.