Warriors

Joe Lacob on Warriors' pending free agents: 'Nobody’s going to outspend us'

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Joe Lacob on Warriors' pending free agents: 'Nobody’s going to outspend us'

It's a potential reality that has become impossible for the Warriors and their fans to ignore, given recent developments: At least one of Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson -- both scheduled to become free agents at season's end -- could be wearing a different jersey next season.

The Knicks have opened up massive salary-cap space and are rumored to be making a run at Durant. Lakers fans were chanting 'WE WANT THOMPSON' from the upper deck of Oracle Arena on Saturday night, although Klay said he didn't hear them.

The fact that both All-Stars would be attractive targets for other teams comes as no surprise, both because of their individual talent level and the general collective desire to bring an end to Golden State's hegemony. However, if either Durant or Thompson plays somewhere other than Golden State, it won't be because the Warriors were unwilling to pay enough to keep them.

In a conversation with The Athletic's Tim Kawakami, Warriors owner Joe Lacob said cost wouldn't be a prohibitive factor in keeping the team's current trajectory going.

"We can do whatever we want (financially),” Lacob said. “And you should expect that that’s not going to be a reason this team … doesn’t stay great going forward. We have the capital to pay our players what they deserve. And we will."

As Kawakami notes, that's a slightly different tone than Lacob has struck in the past, when he's at times indicated there might come a point when cost outgrows resources. The fact that the opening of Chase Center -- and the immense resulting cash flow -- are imminent likely is part of the reason why.

Even if the Warriors lose Durant or Thompson despite their best efforts, it won't change their approach to roster building.

[RELATED: Outsider Observation: How the NBA rumor mill affects KD]

"I think we’ll continue to have a good team, if not a great team, and try to hopefully be a title-contending team for as long as we can," Lacob told Kawakami. "We’ll be aggressive. Nobody’s going to outspend us. Nobody’s going to outwork us."

While it's a fun exercise to postulate who the Warriors' backup plans might involve, perhaps even years down the road -- Kawakami offers up names such as Giannis Antetokounmpo, Joel Embiid, Kristaps Porzingis and Karl-Anthony Towns -- Lacob and the Warriors remain fully intent on keeping this current group together.

"All I can say right now is I think we love our roster with all our players, the coaching staff," Lacob said. "I think we’re in a really good spot. I can only say, we’ll evaluate at the end of the season and sort of see if anything’s changed from where we are today. Right now, it looks pretty good.

"This is probably our best roster ever."

Warriors' Draymond Green reveals desire to retire from NBA in 10 years

Warriors' Draymond Green reveals desire to retire from NBA in 10 years

For Warriors star Draymond Green, this offseason has been all about the Benjamins.

First, Green agreed to a four-year, $100 million contract extension with Golden State, keeping the three-time All-Star from potentially entering free agency in 2020.

Then last week, one of Green’s first investments -- Smile Direct Club -- went public on the stock market and went from a $150 million valuation to a $9 billion valuation. Draymond told Forbes that his investment is now worth 40 times what it was initially.

Green was recently asked about his future plans after basketball, and the 29-year-old has no desire to slow down his money-making moves.

“Ten years from now I'd like to be retired from the NBA, engaged in a number of business ventures,” Green told Inc.com. “And well on my way to my goal of becoming a billionaire.”

Even with seven NBA seasons under his belt, Green has played an average of almost 94 games a year, including both the regular-season and postseason play. At that rate, he would end up amassing 1,593 games played for his career if he played 10 more NBA seasons, placing him second on the NBA’s all-time games played list behind Robert Parish. 

However, Green lost over 20 pounds during the 2018-19 season and took his game to a new level in the postseason, and with today’s modern technology, players are staying fresh longer than ever before. 

I mean Vince Carter is still lacing up his sneakers next to players who weren’t even born when the 42-year-old made his NBA debut.

[RELATED: Watch Warriors star Steph Curry's dance moves at brother Seth's wedding]

We’ll see if Green can parlay his very successful offseason into his on the court play when the Warriors open up the preseason on Oct. 5 at Chase Center against the Los Angeles Lakers.

Until then, keep cashing those checks, Dray.

Watch Warriors star Steph Curry's dance moves at brother Seth's wedding

Watch Warriors star Steph Curry's dance moves at brother Seth's wedding

Every Warriors fan has seen a Steph Curry shimmy.

When the two-time NBA MVP hits a big shot, the shimmy comes out. It's a move Warriors fans love and other teams hate. 

There's no hating on Steph's latest dance moves, though. The Warriors' star point guard was on Cloud Nine and showing off his dance moves over the weekend while younger brother Seth got married in Malibu. 

The Curry brothers took center stage during the playoffs last season when the Warriors and Trail Blazers faced off in the Western Conference finals. Seth scored 6.3 points per game off the bench and then signed a four-year, $32 million contract with the Mavericks this offseason.

[RELATED: Check out Steph's $31M three-level mansion in Atherton]

The younger Curry brother married Callie Rivers, the daughter of Clippers coach Doc Rivers. There could be some real competitive H-O-R-S-E games at holidays between these families in the future.

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