Warriors

Kerr befuddled by Barkley's criticism of Warriors: 'I think he goes overboard'

Kerr befuddled by Barkley's criticism of Warriors: 'I think he goes overboard'

As Charles Barkley continues to throw rubber darts at the Warriors, disparaging their style of play at every opportunity, sometimes going out of his way to do so, the Warriors continue to shrug them off.

They believe the only significant response to Barkley or any other critic is by producing successful results.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr has known Barkley for years and he basically sees his act as perfect made-for-TV moments.

“Having worked with Charles in TV, for TNT, I understand that there’s a show that has to happen,” Kerr said Friday on The Warriors Insider Podcast. “There’s an entertainment value that he brings that nobody else can bring. I think Charles is hilarious. He’s really good at what he does.”

Yet Kerr is at least slightly puzzled when Barkley constantly singles out the Warriors for being a “jump-shooting team” or playing “little girly basketball,” as he said Thursday on TNT.

“I think he goes overboard with his criticism of us,” Kerr said. “Everybody is the league is basically doing what we’re doing. Cleveland takes more 3s than we do. They beat us last year in The Finals by going small and shooting 3s and LeBron (James) playing the 4. The series came down to Kyrie (Irving) making a 3.”

It’s apparent to those paying attention that Barkley, who retired in 2000, has not made the observational transition to basketball as it is played in 2016.

The Warriors average 32.2 3-pointers per game, behind the Rockets (37.0) and defending champion Cavaliers (34.8). Only one team, the Pistons, at 19.8, averages less than 20 shots beyond the arc per game.

When Barkley retired in 2000, only the Kings, at 20.2, averaged more than 20 3-pointers per game. The Rockets were second, at 19.8, and Barkley was a member of that team.

“This is just the way the game is played these days: spread the floor, very few low-post plays,” Kerr said. “The game has changed a lot. I don’t know why Charles continues to crush us. But the game’s changed, and almost everybody is playing like this now.”

Whereas the big men of yesteryear – Hakeem Olajuwon, Shaquille O’Neal, David Robinson etc. – tended to operate in the low post, those of today are more likely to venture out beyond the elbow, and even the arc.

“The big guys that you see now who are coming into the league, the best players, guys like Anthony Davis and Karl-Anthony Towns, they’re out there shooting jump shots, because they grew up handling the ball,” Kerr said. “They grew up as guys who wanted to be Kevin Durant, and not Charles Oakley.”

Though some of the transition is due to bigger players being more versatile, it’s also a matter of coaches understanding new rules and finding rosters that can exploit them. Gone is the hand-check, as well as the days of zone defenses being illegal.

“We do what we need to do to be successful,” Kerr said. “. . . Our players are suited to play the way we play, and we’re not going to apologize for that. But we know that criticism and judgment are just part of the deal. It really doesn’t bother us.”

Warriors' rest advantage grows with Raptors' Game 4 win against Bucks

Warriors' rest advantage grows with Raptors' Game 4 win against Bucks

If you subscribe to the notion that a playoff series doesn't begin until a home team loses, well, then the Eastern Conference finals have yet to begin.

After dropping the first two games of the series on the road, the Toronto Raptors evened the series with the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night with a 120-102 victory at Scotiabank Arena in Game 4.

In winning each of the last two games at home, Toronto has ensured that the Eastern Conference finals will go at least six games. Meanwhile, the Golden State Warriors have already advanced to their fifth consecutive NBA Finals after sweeping the Portland Trail Blazers in four games.

Golden State has plenty of time to rest up before the Finals begin on May 30th. Whichever team represents the Eastern Conference won't have as much of a luxury.

Given the fact that several players on the Warriors' roster -- most notably Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala and DeMarcus Cousins -- missed part or all of the series sweep of the Blazers with injuries, the extra time off before the Finals begin certainly comes in handy.

[RELATED: Dubs overcome injuries to earn some much-needed rest]

Game 6 between the Bucks and Raptors is on Sat. May 25th, meaning whichever team that comes out of the East will have at most four days to recuperate before the Finals begin.

That would already seem to be a significant advantage for Golden State, but if you want to get greedy, there's plenty of reason to believe the Eastern Conference finals could require a Game 7.

Patrick Beverley says Clippers gave Warriors best challenge in playoffs

Patrick Beverley says Clippers gave Warriors best challenge in playoffs

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley is a confident person.

Beverley doesn't back down from anybody and he speaks his mind freely.

On Tuesday morning, he made the following declaration on Twitter:

Sorry Mr. Beverley, but we respectfully disagree.

Here were the results of the Warriors-Clippers first-round NBA playoff series:
Game 1 = Warriors 121, Clippers 104
Game 2 = Clippers 135, Warriors 131 (Golden State led by 31 points with about 7:30 left in the third quarter)
Game 3 = Warriors 132, Clippers 105
Game 4 = Warriors 113, Clippers 105
Game 5 = Clippers 129, Warriors 101
Game 6 = Warriors 129, Clippers 110

The Dubs' average margin of victory was nearly 18 points.

In the second round, the Rockets beat the Warriors twice and every game was decided by six points or less.

Although Golden State swept Portland in the Western Conference finals, the Blazers had the following leads:
Game 2 = 17 points early in the third quarter
Game 3 = 18 points late in the second quarter
Game 4 = 17 points with less than two minutes left in the third quarter

[RELATEDDame says Dubs-Blazers 'completely different' with one change]

While you could make the argument that the Clippers gave a better challenge than the Blazers, the Rockets clearly were the most formidable foe.

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