Warriors

Kevin Durant calls out referee on Instagram after Warriors' controversial loss

Kevin Durant calls out referee on Instagram after Warriors' controversial loss

The Warriors' 131-130 overtime loss to the Minnesota Timberwolves on Friday was shrouded in controversy.

And Kevin Durant wasted no time jumping on social media to call out one of the refs, Leon Wood.

The call in question came after the Warriors had tied the score at 130 in overtime on a dramatic Steph Curry corner 3-pointer.

With 0.5 seconds left on the clock, Anthony Tolliver tried to throw the inbounds pass to Karl-Anthony Towns. Durant appeared to hold on to Towns, and Wood called him for the foul.

Towns went to the line, made the first free throw and missed the second. The clock ran out, and the Warriors lost.

"We deserved to play at least five more minutes of basketball," Durant told the media after the game in Minnesota.

Wood wasn't the only ref Durant went after. Marat Kogut was the one who called a foul on Durant's 3-pointer that was waved off prior to Curry's shot.

"Marat, he was the best player on the floor tonight," Durant said. "He's so good with his whistle that he knew they were going to foul me, and he called it right before I shot the ball, so he's one of the greatest refs of all time."

[RELATED: Steph, KD blast refs after loss to Timberwolves]

Even Curry got in on the Instagram bash game.

Durant -- and Curry -- can expect to write a check to the NBA on Saturday.

Why Monta Ellis' Warriors game-winner vs. Nets is proudest NBA moment

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AP

Why Monta Ellis' Warriors game-winner vs. Nets is proudest NBA moment

The 2006-07 NBA season was a special one for Monta Ellis.

He won the league's Most Improved Player award, playing a pivotal role for the "We Believe" Warriors. Golden State won its first playoff series in over a decade, upsetting the defending Western Conference champion Dallas Mavericks as a No. 8 seed.

Those Warriors hold a special place in the team's history, and the award was the only one Ellis won in his decade-plus as an NBA cult hero. Ellis told SLAM Magazine he holds another memory near and dear to his heart: A game-winning shot against the then-New Jersey Nets.

Ellis' wide-open 3-pointer sealed the Warriors' 111-109 win over Jason Kidd and the Nets on Jan. 24, 2007, giving him a signature moment and Golden State a much-needed victory in its push to the playoffs.

"The game was tight," Ellis said. "I forgot who shot that ball in the corner, I think it was Vince Carter, and we ended up getting the rebound. Baron got the rebound and we thought Don Nelson was going to call a timeout, but he didn’t. So Baron pushed the ball and I ran the wing and it was, like, a 3-on-2. But he was more to the left side and J-Kidd had to [make the stop], so he had to play between me and Baron.

"He decided to stop Baron and Baron kicked me the ball, and I ended up shooting it and hitting the game-winner. That was the year that I won Most Improved. I would have to say that one right there."

[RELATED: Monta shares great story on BD, his funniest Dubs teammate]

The Warriors finished 42-40 that season, while the ninth-seeded Los Angeles Clippers ended the campaign with a 40-42 record. An Ellis miss combined with another loss along the way, and the "We Believe" Warriors would've never been.

You can probably say the same of any of Golden State's other close calls that year, but none will carry as much meaning to Ellis as his game-winner.

Steph Curry says Riley called him a 'three-star' substitute teacher

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AP

Steph Curry says Riley called him a 'three-star' substitute teacher

Steph Curry was the NBA’s first unanimous MVP, but his daughter thinks he’s right around replacement level in the classroom.

The Warriors star told former teammate JaVale McGee in an Instagram Live on the NBA’s account Friday that he is serving as a de facto teacher’s assistant for his daughter Riley’s second-grade class. After her class -- held over Zoom due to the coronavirus pandemic shutting down schools -- is over, the elder Curry said he gives Riley her assignments.

He hasn’t reached her usual standards.

“She told my mom today, she said I’m a three-star teacher,” Curry told McGee. “I said, ‘Dang. That’s cold. That’s so cold-blooded. I am invested into your future, young lady. This is how you repay me?’ It’s crazy.”

Curry probably hasn’t been doubted this much since high school, when he committed to Davidson College after receiving next to no other Division I scholarship offers. He has ridden a rocket ship ever since, leading his Wildcats on a Cinderella run in March Madness, getting selected No. 7 overall in the 2009 draft, winning three NBA championships and emerging as a global superstar in the meantime.

[RELATED: Tracing birth of Dubs' dynasty back to Game 1 of '15 Finals]

The 32-year-old's accolades haven’t translated to his daughter’s studies, apparently, so Curry will just have to win over another critic.

One in his own household might prove tougher to silence than any other along the way, though.